AMD R9 290 Graphics Card Review

Today we get to see the last of the R9 lineup – the AMD R9 290. To the surprise of many, AMD is positioning this card against the recently-price-reduced GTX 780. Can it hold up against NVIDIA’s cut down GK110 GPU? The R9 290X sure did, so we have high hopes for the R9 290. Let’s see what it has to offer, shall we?

Wrapping Up The R9 Launch – AMD’s R9 290

AMD is finishing up the launch of its new lineup with the R9 290. It’s not the Big Dog; that was launched last week. This one is the big dog’s slightly littler brother. The R9 290 has 2,560 shaders as compared to the R9 290Xs 2,816 and its top clock is reduced to 947 MHz (from 1,000 MHz).

Aside from those two changes, you’re looking at pretty much identical GPUs. Both share the updated GCN core, both have TrueAudio capabilities and both will benefit from Mantle when it comes out (as will all GCN-equipped cards). Also present is the impressively wide 512-bit memory bus and 4 GB GDDR5 frame buffer.

Final R9 290 Specifications

Final R9 290 Specifications

AMD R9 290 GPUz

AMD R9 290 GPU-Z

Testing The AMD R9 290′s Boost Clocks

As mentioned in the R9 290 series launch article, boost frequencies on the R9 290 series are now similar to how NVIDIA handles boost. The GPU is made to stay within its power target and within its temperature target. With the R9 290, there isn’t a problem keeping the GPU at stock in its power range. Temperature is where you may run into some throttling.

Where it gets interesting for the R9 290 is that AMD was originally positioning this card against the GTX 770, which it does a very good job of trouncing. With NVIDIA dropping the bottom out of the GTX 780′s price to $499 from $649, that changed things a little bit. AMD decided they wanted to position the R9 290 against the GTX 780 instead. This is where it gets good. You see, AMD’s stock BIOS sets the card’s top fan speed at 40%, which is nice and quiet. However, it leaves a good bit of performance on the table because the GPU will reach its temperature target (95 °C) and have to throttle back to keep temps under the target.

After NVIDIA dropped their prices, AMD came out with a new driver and had reviewer’s re-test their GPU with the new driver. The fun part is that the only thing the new driver changed was the stock fan speed cap. It went from 40% to 47%. This allowed the GPU to use more fan speed to keep itself away from its temperature target, thus keeping the GPU running at a higher frequency for longer. That is what is borne out in the graph below. The red line is with the R9 290′s max fan speed at 40% and the blue line is with it at 47%.

Stock Boost Frequency

Stock Boost Frequency

Interestingly, it is able to kick the fan in and bring that frequency right back up to 947 MHz. it then drops the fan speed until it is needed again. Personally, I think they should have done this from the start. Why on earth you would leave performance on the table over slightly quieter operation. This is a blower cooler, so I understand wanting to keep it a bit quieter, but 7% just seems silly. That difference, just at the tail end of the Heaven benchmark, accounted for about a 120 point difference in the score. It also accounts for FPS in games. Not many FPS in our testing (typically 1-3 FPS), but that really depends on who was doing the testing and where.

This is a weird tangent, but worth mentioning. It’s fall here in North Carolina, and temperatures are blissfully low. When I was testing this card the first time, ambient temperature in our office was ~20-21 °C, so even with 40% max fan, the GPU stayed away from its temp target pretty well. So, when they raised the max fan speed to 47%, it made a difference, but not huge. I would expect other review sites that are in warmer climes (or that turn their heat on earlier than we do in the season) probably saw a bit more of a performance differential between the two drivers.

The best part about all of this is that when you see board partners come out with better cooling solutions than these reference blower coolers, you’re virtually guaranteed operation at the full 947 MHz boost all the time, and with near silence. Of course, you can operate at 947 MHz all the time on the reference cooler too; just raise the max fan speed up a little more (55-60% or so) and you’ll always keep the GPU away from the temp target, thus ensuring that no throttling will occur.

AMD’s Internal Testing

Of course, AMD ran their own performance testing as they always do, so we’ll show you what they came up with before moving on to our own testing. As mentioned, this card is now positioned to compete with the GTX 780 and AMD shows it doing a respectable job against the competition.

Product Positioning

Product Positioning

Because of the wide memory bus and extra memory (plus the R9 290′s processing power of course), this card should be a beast at high resolutions. In this test of Battlefield 4, AMD pits the R9 290 at 4K versus the GTX 780 running surround 5760×1080. If we do the math, that’s 33% more pixels – and the R9 290 is darn near keeping up with the GTX 780.

Battlefield 4 Performance

Battlefield 4 Performance

When you go and run the GTX 780 also at 4K resolution, the R9 290 runs away with it. I have issues with the 4K push, as outlined previously, mostly because the vast majority of gamers won’t have a 4K resolution monitor before this GPU is long off the market. However, it paints the R9 290 in a very positive light, which I’m quite sure is why AMD likes to show off its UltraHD performance differential.

AMD's 4K Ultra HD Testing

AMD’s 4K Ultra HD Testing

AMD's 4K Ultra HD Testing

AMD’s 4K Ultra HD Testing

Crossfire scaling looks great from AMD’s testing. Across a wide range of games, scaling goes from about 1.8x to very near full 2.0x scaling in a couple titles.

AMD R9 290 Crossfire Testing

AMD R9 290 Crossfire Testing

Enough of AMD’s numbers though. Let’s meet the R9 290 in the flesh.

Meet The AMD R9 290

Aesthetically, you won’t be able to tell a reference R9 290 from a reference R9 290X; you need to look at the sticker on the back (or, you know, the box yours comes in).

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

I actually like the reference cooler’s looks. I don’t really like any blower-style cooler’s noise (other than the one NVIDIA came out with for the TITAN / 780 / 770, which is amazing for a blower cooler), but at least it looks nice.

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

There are three small intakes for the fan to pull air from the rear as well as from underneath the fan. These seem more for the aforementioned aesthetics than functionality, but hey, every little bit helps.

Fan Intakes

Fan Intakes

The R9 290 has two power connectors, in an 8-pin + 6-pin PCIe configuration.

8-pin + 6-pin PCIe Power

8-pin + 6-pin PCIe Power

The R9 290 follows in its big brother’s footsteps and eschews the old Crossfire bridge in favor of DMA Crossfire, which shares its data through the PCIe bus.

Also present is the dual BIOS switch, however I couldn’t discern any difference between the two states on this card. On the R9 290X, it functioned to put the card in “Uber” mode, which apparently just changed the max fan speed from 40% to 55%. With the new PowerTune technology, that enabled greater performance (by keeping the card cooler) at the expense of added noise.

When I flipped the switch, nothing happened on this card. Clocks stayed the same and, at least in CCC, the max fan speed stayed at 47%. As there was no discernible change, I left it on the “Uber” side (closest to the video outputs) and benched there for stock numbers.

No Crossfire Connectors & BIOS Switch

No Crossfire Connectors & BIOS Switch

No Crossfire Connectors & BIOS Switch

No Crossfire Connectors & BIOS Switch

Speaking of video outputs, this card has the same new configuration as well, with two DVI, one HDMI and one full size DisplayPort outputs. You can use any of these connectors for any three monitors. You can even use up to six monitors if you use a DisplayPort splitter. On the HD 7970, I could never use both DVI outputs, having instead to use one DVI and two mini-DisplayPort outputs. I’m happy to report that wasn’t the case here and you really can use any of the three outputs you feel like using.

Video Outputs

Video Outputs

Time to pull that cooler off.

Under the Hood

We’ll start by pulling off that plastic shroud. Once removed, you can see the card uses a vapor chamber cooler on the GPU itself, with tight fin spacing, which is part of the reason this cooler is so loud.

Vapor Chamber Cooler

Vapor Chamber Cooler

I’m also very happy to report that the cooler makes contact with every RAM chip and every MOSFET on the card.

VRM & RAM Cooling

VRM & RAM Cooling

Contact on all those chips was good and they should all be adequately cooled.

Cooler Removed

Cooler Removed

Now we meet the monster itself, the AMD R9 290 in the flesh. It’s a great looking PCB, especially for a reference model. I just love seeing all those RAM chips on there. They had to come up with some interesting placement to fit four gigs around that GPU.

R9 290 PCB

AMD R9 290 PCB

R9 290 PCB Rear

AMD R9 290 PCB Rear

The R9 290 GPU itself is definitely larger than its predecessor.

R9 290 GPU

AMD R9 290 GPU

The GDDR5 that comes on the R9 290 is the same SKhynix memory that appeared on the R9 290X.

Hynix vDDR5 vRAM

Hynix vDDR5 vRAM

Also the same is the R9 290′s power section. There appear to be five power phases for the GPU, one for the vRAM and a PLL phase toward the video outputs. This is the only less-than-great spot on an otherwise solid PCB; it could use a slightly more robust power section.

Power Connectors & Power Section

Power Connectors & Power Section

Power Section

Power Section

PLL Phase

PLL Phase

Here’s the BIOS switch and crossfire connectors (well, lack thereof) without the cooler in the way.

No Crossfire Connectors & BIOS Switch

No Crossfire Connectors & BIOS Switch

Well, that’s the AMD R9 290. It definitely has more in common with the R9 290X than it doesn’t.

AMD R9 290

AMD R9 290

Test Setup

Our test setup is one you’ve come to know and love since the new Haswell platform came out this summer. It consists of an i7 4770K operating at 4.0 GHz with RAM at DDR3-1966 / 9-9-9-24. There is plenty of competition for you today, from the top of NVIDIA’s line to AMD’s last generation flagship.

CPU i7 4770K @ 4.0 GHz
MB ASUS Maximus VI Extreme
RAM G.Skill TridentX DDR3-2600 @ 1866MHz 9-9-9-24
GPUs ASUS HD 7970 DirectCU II TOP
AMD R9 280X
NVIDIA GTX 770
NVIDIA GTX 780
NVIDIA GTX TITAN
AMD R9 290
OS Windows 7 Professional x64

It definitely looks nice all nestled cozy on the test bench.

AMD R9 290 Installed

AMD R9 290 Installed

Overclocking

Overclocking the R9 290 series cards is different than previous generations. AMD says you “no longer have to” set the frequency of a card. Instead, what you now set are percentages. You set the percentage of the power limit you want to give to the card (+20% should be more than adequate for anything you can reach on ambient cooling), then in the same graph, you set the percentage of GPU overclock you want to apply. Unfortunately, that doesn’t give you any actual number, so you’ll have to break out your calculator to see where you’re going, or just run GPU-Z real quick to see the actual frequency you set. To me, this is an annoyance. Frankly, I don’t want AMD to say that I no longer “have to” set the frequency. Newsflash AMD – those of us that overclock want to be able to set the frequency! This is not, I repeat – NOT – a helpful thing.

Catalyst Control Center Overclocking

Catalyst Control Center Overclocking

Scrolling on down, you can see that we aren’t allowed to (excuse me, don’t have to) set memory frequency directly either. The only direct value we have access to is the temperature target. I guess they couldn’t figure out how to positively spin putting temperature as a percentage, so they left that one alone. Fan speed as a percentage is normal and expected.

Catalyst Control Center Overclocking

Catalyst Control Center Overclocking

Where we ended up with our sample was a +14% overclock on the GPU and a +12% overclock on the memory, which, for normal people is 1080 MHz on the GPU and 1400 MHz on the memory.

3DMark Fire Strike - Overclocked to 1080 / 1400

3DMark Fire Strike – Overclocked to 1080 / 1400

That’s not a bad overclock at all. Setting the fan speed to a louder, but stronger target allowed the card to boost to its max all the time without issue.

Temperature & Power Consumption

Temperatures on the R9 290 aren’t great, which is exactly how it was designed. The card will not harm itself operating at high temperature and it will keep itself quiet thanks to the stock fan speed cap of 47%. If you prefer to keep your card cooler rather than quieter, you can raise the fan speed cap and lower the temperature target, it’s completely up to you. This is just how the stock BIOS is supposed to keep the card. Thus, this is less an indication of cooler performance and more just showing that the card does what it’s programmed to do.

GPU Temperature

GPU Temperature

Power consumption on the R9 290 isn’t surprising. It’s a very built-up Graphics Core Next GPU on the same process as last generation. When you do that, you raise power consumption. The R9 290 draws a little bit more power than the GTX 780, but not much. As long as it performs well enough to justify power consumption in that same neighborhood, you won’t hear a complaint about this card’s power pull from us.

System Power Consumption

System Power Consumption

Performance Results

Performance is measured according to our GPU testing procedures, as outlined in our article by that name. Long story short: benchmarks are run at their default settings and games are run with every type of eye candy (MSAA, detail, etc) cranked to the max at 1080p, which is where most gamers will be doing their gaming.

Synthetic Benchmarks

Starting off with a bang, the R9 290 comes out strong. In this older DirectX 10 benchmark, the GTX 780 comes out slightly ahead with the R9 290 at stock, then the R9 290 takes the lead when overclocked. The GTX 770 that AMD used to be positioning this GPU against? Yea, it’s way behind, so the re-positioning seems to be on target from the get-go.

3DMark Vantage

3DMark Vantage

When you start benchmarking with DirectX 11, the picture gets much more rosy for AMD. Only the TITAN beats the R9 290 at stock and even it falls behind after overclocking the 290.

3DMark 11

3DMark 11

The story repeats itself with Fire Strike, beating the GTX 780 at stock and beating the TITAN overclocked.

3DMark Fire Strike

3DMark Fire Strike

If three’s a trend, then consider benchmark results trending in AMD’s direction. The win over the GTX 780 here isn’t huge, but still over 100 points. After being overclocked it becomes a big win over the stock TITAN.

HWBot Heaven Xtreme

HWBot Heaven Xtreme

Well then. AMD was positioning this card against the GTX 770. As you can see, from a benchmarking perspective it’s neck and neck with the GTX 780 so repositioning it there makes perfect sense. The R9 290 can even consistently beat TITAN when overclocked. When benchmarking these, I was pleasantly surprised and I’m sure you are too, but you’re probably thinking, like I was, that benchmarks are only part of the story. Gaming is where the rubber meets the road.

Game Testing

Coming out swinging, the stock R9 290 beats even TITAN, simply extending its lead when overclocked.

Aliens vs. Predator

Aliens vs. Predator

The R9 290 can’t beat NVIDIA’s pair of GK110 GPUs in Batman: Arkham City, with both of them coming out ahead. Only overclocked does the R9 290 barely edge out the GTX 780.

Batman: Arkham City

Batman: Arkham City

Battlefield 3 restores what appeared in benchmarks to be the natural order.

Battlefield 3

Battlefield 3

GK110 comes out ahead in Civilization V, but the R9 290 does a solid job against the GTX 770.

Civilization V

Civilization V

Dirt 3 goes AMD’s way, with even TITAN unable to compete with the R9 290.

Dirt 3

Dirt 3

Natural order is restored again for both Metro 2033 and Crysis 3 – GTX 780 < R9 290 < TITAN < overclocked R9 290.

Metro 2033

Metro 2033

Crysis 3

Crysis 3

1080p gaming is much like benchmarking. Overall the R9 290 is better than the GTX 780, sometimes by a fair bit, but to be fair, on occasion the two are close. Most interesting was that the R9 290 can consistently beat a stock GTX TITAN when overclocked. That’s huge, especially considering where this card should be priced.

Before moving on to high resolution testing, I wanted to share a few more games with you guys. We’re in the process of modernizing our gaming suite. The database is small but growing for these (and a couple more) games, so comparisons aren’t worth graphing right now. However, since they were run, I thought I’d share what sort of FPS you can expect out of these more recent games with you, both stock and overclocked. The biggest part of this is Battlefield 4, which just launched last week. The R9 290 has excellent FPS using the Ultra preset.

Bonus Games

Bonus Games

AMD Eyefinity / NVIDIA Surround

AMD really pushed 4K gaming with the R9 290 series launch, and for good reason; the R9 290X performed great there. We don’t have any 4K monitors (should I mention again the only 4K monitor on Newegg costs $3,500?), but we DO have Eyefinity and Surround we can test, to the tune of 5760 x 1080 resolution.

Eyefinity / Surround Testing

Eyefinity / Surround Testing

Wow! It’s no wonder AMD pushed 4K so much. At these high resolutions, with its 4 GB frame buffer operating on a 512-bit wide bus, the stock R9 290 not only takes out the GTX 780 handily, it beats the TITAN…in Every. Game. Overclocked just makes matters worse for NVIDIA.

Final Thoughts & Conclusion

Let’s see, hmm…what’s missing from this review? Oh, right, price! I intentionally didn’t tell you the price before so you would have to see how it performed before we got to it. So, what does the AMD R9 290 cost? $399 MSRP. That’s right, there is GTX 780-level performance available for another $100 less than the GTX 780′s current price. Let’s not forget that’s after the original price drop due to the R9 290X out-performing the GTX 780.

The performance of this card was great, impressing me start to finish but when AMD emailed the final pricing, I was blown away. I had expected $449, but $399 re-writes the landscape. Again.

Are there drawbacks? Sure there are. For starters, it isn’t exactly low in power consumption; the GTX 780 beats it there. Additionally, the reference cooler on these things isn’t anything to call home about. It looks good, but it’s noisy. At over about 60-65% fan speed it’s annoyingly so; and you’ll need that cooling ability to get the most out of your card. Hopefully board partners will come out with non-reference cooling solutions sooner rather than later. For you water coolers, EK Water Blocks already has a block out for the R9 290X and the PCB looks so similar they are likely interchangeable (verify with EK first!).

If you’re concerned with noise and you don’t have a low-ambient room to put this card in for gaming, you may want to wait for partner cards. If you can tolerate a bit of extra fan noise – and let’s face it, you know what you’re getting into with any blower cooler other than NVIDIA’s on the high end GTX line – this card will tear through some games at high FPS.

Cooler notwithstanding, the fact remains that the AMD R9 290 can meet or beat a GTX 780 for $100 less. That’s not chump change. This is a great price on a very well performing card. Add solid overclocking as well as a 512-bit memory bus with 4 GB frame buffer, and the R9 290 is sure looking like a winner from AMD. I daresay, at the high end there isn’t a better price-to-performance ratio card on the market right now.

Overclockers_clear_approved

Jeremy Vaughan (hokiealumnus)

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Discussion
  1. Agreed on many of the comments above. I've noted over the years that both camps seem to have regular updates to their drivers, even affecting older hardware model numbers. No different with MBs, LAN chips, etc.
    Nvidia is more stable with driver development, thats just a fact. But it doesnt mean that Nvidia is free of issues, of course not.

    watchthisspace
    Team Green probably have a lot more resources to throw at driver development compared to team Red.


    It may be true for the past but with both next gen consoles at theyr back, AMD may now be able to get a lot of dev support considering countless software matters, so i may consider the possible R+D head to head with Nvidia soon. Although the console devs still need to warm up, that stuff just recently been released, but im pretty sure the console knowledge will be of advantage to AMD. So i just say "never give up". GCN is the most beasty architecture AMD ever created but a beast is always hard to tame... thats how a beast is behaving. ;) Well sure, the new 512 bit bus is another "beast factor", something AMD never used in the past and it is another challenge in order to tame. Its surely not a question of performance, its a question how to get it under control, thats something AMD rarely experienced in the past.

    Most important stuff is the CF fix for Radeon and that one seems to work pretty good now, its surely a key factor able to bring AMD into real competition with Nvidia.

    Btw: Nope. 290X at OC isnt behind of a 780 TI OC but it got higher heat issues when no "super cooler" used. The 290X is made for experts, "usual" people wont make them evolve into "beast mode" but once the card is properly cooled (so we wont experience throttle) and clocked, it may easely keep up with the 780 TI. The problem with those new flagships is truly, "how to tame"; that says it all. Certainly, Nvidia is feeling the competition because they used a Tesla GPU in order to "boost" theyr 780 TI, as far as i know its the same chip such as the server Tesla GPU... so Nvidia is kinda giving all they got.
    Brolloks
    AMD has always, since I can remember from my "run and get the latest card" days, had issues with drivers after release, it gets better a couple of months later, that is just a fact imo. Nvidia is by no means perfect with drivers but far better at it, might be architecture related rather than development resources.


    It seems to be that both Nvidia and AMD/ATI have driver issues. From what I have read is that a "minor" number of users seem to be having "some" issues.

    Which usually makes me wonder what type of problems, what games and how often?:shrug:

    Brolloks you are most likely right - just seems that it takes a while for things to get straightened out.
    AMD has always, since I can remember from my "run and get the latest card" days, had issues with drivers after release, it gets better a couple of months later, that is just a fact imo. Nvidia is by no means perfect with drivers but far better at it, might be architecture related rather than development resources.
    Not that I've got much time to game, but I recently put this back in a system and will try to reproduce the problem. I don't believe it's extremely widespread, but AMD has apparently acknowledged the issue on forums and has narrowed it down to GDDR5 training. This is unsurprising since it's their first 512 bit memory controller; growing pains are inevitable and this doesn't show itself in testing, just extended playing of the type not typically seen in reviewing. I'll throw some games at it (probably after Thanksgiving unfortunately...our office is also our guest room) and see what happens.
    I've never bought newly released GPU's that aren't developments of existing designs, so I don't really know if that's an inordinate amount of complaints -- but when I read about peeps being unable to play more than a handful of games, that seems like a problem.
    magellan
    Over on AMD's tech support forums there are a lot of reported gaming problems w/AMD's R290 drivers right now. It might be worth it too wait until AMD sorts out the R290 driver issues.
    Is that actually an inordinate amount though? I mean, I can go look at Nvidia forums and see people having the same problems with the latest and previous drivers...:shrug: but we don't report that...

    Though not many people have them here, I have not heard a large amount (any?) of complaints. Also, another, much larger forum I frequent has an 'owners club' thread as well with nary a complaint on games.
    Ivy
    Surprising because its just a improved GCN and almost the same old architecture. But AMD + driver was never a good match, so such issues have to be expected at every single new hardware. :D

    Wouldnt be that big of a deal in term Nvidia was sleeping, but Nvidia just released a new "super driver" including up to 50% performance boost for some games and of course the newly released 780 TI, so the competition isnt sleeping. So i recommend to sort that stuff out soon, Radeon hardware is still top notch but i suggest to work even harder than ever, so the same issue we had at the 7970 release wont happen another time...


    Team Green probably have a lot more resources to throw at driver development compared to team Red. But fingers crossed team Red pull through! I'd show my support to Red sooner, but I'm awaiting for non-reference variants to be unleashed (which should of been a day one thing IMO) annnd for money.
    Surprising because its just a improved GCN and almost the same old architecture. But AMD + driver was never a good match, so such issues have to be expected at every single new hardware. :D

    Wouldnt be that big of a deal in term Nvidia was sleeping, but Nvidia just released a new "super driver" including up to 50% performance boost for some games and of course the newly released 780 TI, so the competition isnt sleeping. So i recommend to sort that stuff out soon, Radeon hardware is still top notch but i suggest to work even harder than ever, so the same issue we had at the 7970 release wont happen another time...
    Over on AMD's tech support forums there are a lot of reported gaming problems w/AMD's R290 drivers right now. It might be worth it too wait until AMD sorts out the R290 driver issues.
    hokiealumnus
    Wait until tomorrow for possible info on a (small) inclusion that might be construed as a bundle if i could possibly talk about it, which I can't.

    As far as wide availability, they're available now but I have no idea whether partner cards will be available by the holiday season. I'd imagine they WANT them available by then, but have no actual info on whether they WILL have them by then.


    Thanks again! If the bundle is ok that just adds value. If one could pick up a 290X for $150 more - that may actually be a better deal.

    It is nice that AMD/ATI does this at the right time of the year AND delivered the goods performance wise! $400 and (overclocked) beats a Titan in some benchmarks!:screwy::thup::rock:

    That's just what one wants for the holidays!
    Wait until tomorrow for possible info on a (small) inclusion that might be construed as a bundle if i could possibly talk about it, which I can't.

    As far as wide availability, they're available now but I have no idea whether partner cards will be available by the holiday season. I'd imagine they WANT them available by then, but have no actual info on whether they WILL have them by then.
    Thanks for the great and excellent review.

    $400 and all the performance one could ask for. There is no game bundle - at this price performance ratio; we're not sure if we would really expect one.

    Negatives are that it is somewhat loud and isn't power efficient. AIB partners should take care of that.

    Any chance it that it be widely available by say the "Winter Holiday Season"?:shrug:

    Thanks again for an outstanding review!:thup:
    Brolloks
    I have one of these sitting here, look like it will fit..anyone think otherwise?


    I've only been told by Arctic that the Arctic Accelero Xtreme III and Hybrid work on the 290X, they didn't mention anything on the II. They do have different mounting holes and compatibility lists that could be causing it to be different. Could always try of course.
    They are coming out with a new one for the 290x... so not sure if that one will fit the 290 as they are more similar than anything that fits under that.

    Try it... let us know. :)