CoolClouds Announces a New Class of Heatsinks

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CoolClouds, a US-based cooling company founded by a Georgia Tech professor and a former manager of a thermal research group at Intel Labs, wants to turn the world of PC cooling upside down. In Q1 2014, CoolClouds plans to begin production on its first consumer product, SuprCool PC. The cooler is aimed squarely at overclockers and gamers aiming for the very best thermal performance. They claim the hybrid water/air heatsink will be the first on the market to cool down 300w.

They passed along a press release for your viewing pleasure:

CoolClouds, Inc. has just announced that it will introduce a new class of heat sink for high-performance desktop computing in mid Q1 2014. Pre-orders can be placed immediately at fundable.com/coolclouds. CoolClouds has developed extreme cooling solutions for the world’s leading technology companies. SuprCool-PC™, its first consumer product, will serve overclocking gamers, professionals who require peak computer performance, and anyone who uses a computer in a hot environment.

“This is a significant advance,” says CoolClouds CEO Ven Holalkere. “Heat management, and hotspots in particular, are the greatest obstacle today to increased processor power. Air-cooled heat sinks are short on power; liquid-cooled heat sinks are short on convenience. We’ve developed a hybrid that seals liquid in a self-contained module that fits easily and quietly inside your computer chassis, and that uses a patent-pending micro-channeling technology to cool the liquid as it circulates. Performance this remarkable has never before been available in a package this convenient.”

SuprCool-PC™ is the first “in chassis” heat sink to cool more than 300w in the latest Intel and AMD processors without hot spots at 65 degrees C case temperature in 25C ambient. Comparable in size to factory-installed heat sinks, it is reliable, quiet, easy to install, and effective even in high-temperature environments.

These are quite impressive claims, but we’ll have to wait and see what kind of performance this product brings. We’ll be sure to get one of these to test just as soon as they are available.

In looking through the data and information available on CoolClouds.net, I am hopeful since the firm was founded by seasoned industry veterans with experience in doing research for Intel,  IBM, Sun Microsystems and more. High profile industry experts do not come cheap, nor is it easy for them to leave their safe corporate job to enter the high-risk world of startups, so I would suspect they are very confident in their products.

There is not a ton of information about the product itself, but the specifications page does offer a 3d model and some preliminary information:

Type Liquid-Air cooled
Fins Aluminum
Cold Plate Copper micro channels
Size 50 x 125 x 165 mm
Weight 800 grams
Power 12V, 0.6 amps
Noise 20 – 40 dBA
4-Pin fan 800 – 2500 rpm
Performance 300W at 65C case temp (assumes 25C ambient)
Orientation Any, with no Degradation
Environment -40C to 60C operational, no degradation over the temperature range
Warranty 2 years
CoolClouds 3D Model

CoolClouds 3D Model

As the press release states, you can actually pre-order the product by “backing” CoolClouds on Fundable. It’s similar to KickStarter, where users can invest in a startup by donating money and helping spread awareness.

Outperform the best heatsinks on the market at half the noise-level? Sounds great to me. I can’t wait to see whether the performance lives up to that claim. Is it possible? Discuss in the comments and stay tuned for updates on the SuprCool PC!

Matt Ring (mdcomp)

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Discussion
  1. So basically the cooling of a 120 rad liquid cooled system but in a compact package that resembles an air cooler.

    I would imagine most currently on air or AIO coolers would be very interested, which is the majority of OCers/users. Interested to see how it performs against other AIO and high end air.

    I am getting Haswell E for my next build as well, and with rumored TDP of 130-140W, it will be soldered.
    That's why I'm waiting for Haswell-E for my next build. I'm hoping it will be soldered. And I'm hoping something like this will be available to cool its overclocked soul.
    @MattNo5ss . Yes you are correct. Heat has to pass through thermal paste layers and we can do nothing about it, since it is a feature of the processor package. We can only minimize the thermal paste layer on the outside of the package. Yes, we use direct to die interface for our in house tests. However, this does not affect the performance reported in terms of 'case temperature'.
    Thanks for link. Promising results, especially since reaching 300W of heat on a current CPU would be hard to do. I'm hoping it scales well with lower heat loads as well.

    A lot of the problem with high temperatures on Ivy Bridge and Haswell is that the heat can't get to the heatsink fast enough since it has to go through two thermal paste layers and the aluminum integrated heatspreader. Any info on your load tester? I would guess the load tester being used is more akin to a direct-to-die interface with only one thermal paste layer, thus removing a thermal paste layer and an aluminum layer which are present in current CPUs.
    Dear All,

    Please watch this 3 and a half minute video to learn more about how we started our foray into heat sinks and our achievements so far.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=389939397805677&set=vb.118071658325787&type=2&theater
    Illuminate clogging? When it clogs, it lights up? I'll assume you meant eliminate, just poking some fun :D

    I'm definitely looking forward to test methodologies and results of a desktop prototype. Are you planning on sending pre or post release samples to tech sites for testing?
    Phase change is an option but it has problems.

    Dry outs can occur in spots and result in hot spots.

    Bubble traps can form and become a second source of hot spots.

    With a single phase design we can avoid these and other issues.

    By the way one of our major design accomplishments was designing the cold plate to be isothermal (no hot spots) and to eliminate clogging. How we do this has been filed as a patent application.
    Smaller channels will mean the coolant will have to be kept contaminant free. Clogs will probably be difficult to remove once they happen. I'll bet this is one of the reasons this tech has never been used in automotive internal combustion engine cooling applications.
    Even though the use of microchannel devices seems very promising, they require a significant amount of power to push the fluid through the channels in high heat flux applications. One solution is to use convective boiling heat transfer and two-phase flow in the microchannels. Use of boiling heat transfer could improve the efficiency of microchannels in two ways: it reduces the pumping power required to push the fluid through the channels, and at its time of phase change, the boiling coolant absorbs energy from the hot surface of the microchannel heat sink, substantially increasing the heat transfer coefficient.


    So, why aren't you using phase change?
    CooLcasetempBob
    How does the SuprCool PC ™ liquid air cooling solution provide high performance in such a small volume and with low air flow compared to heat pipes?

    *

    In short, the heat transfer from the processor case and TIM is more efficient when you use a micro channel cold plate. In addition, there is a more efficient heat transfer from the water to the radiator to the air.

    *

    The first link provides some basic background on micro channels- the concept has been around since 1981 with many proposed variations. Our challenge was to select the micro channel size (they can range from 10’s of microns to 100’s of microns) and have a design that does not create hot spots all at a cost your will like.

    http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1279032

    *

    The link below provides an illustration of why a liquid radiator is more efficient than a heat pipe in transferring heat to air.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=155962421203377&set=vb.118071658325787&type=2&theater

    The next link illustrates how micro channel cold plates are more efficient at transferring heat from the processor to the heat sink and why the liquid will not change phase.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=387805624685721&set=vb.118071658325787&type=2&theater

    In few days we will post the links to test data and pictures of two of our past heat sink designs, one for the Xeon Phi processor heat sink that was used for lab tests by Intel and shown at IDF 2011 and a heat sink for a military project that needed to cool 500 W at 60C ambient.


    I upgraded my pledge to 500. I really hope you get the backing for this.
    How does the SuprCool PC ™ liquid air cooling solution provide high performance in such a small volume and with low air flow compared to heat pipes?

    *

    In short, the heat transfer from the processor case and TIM is more efficient when you use a micro channel cold plate. In addition, there is a more efficient heat transfer from the water to the radiator to the air.

    *

    The first link provides some basic background on micro channels- the concept has been around since 1981 with many proposed variations. Our challenge was to select the micro channel size (they can range from 10’s of microns to 100’s of microns) and have a design that does not create hot spots all at a cost your will like.

    http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1279032

    *

    The link below provides an illustration of why a liquid radiator is more efficient than a heat pipe in transferring heat to air.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=155962421203377&set=vb.118071658325787&type=2&theater

    The next link illustrates how micro channel cold plates are more efficient at transferring heat from the processor to the heat sink and why the liquid will not change phase.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=387805624685721&set=vb.118071658325787&type=2&theater

    In few days we will post the links to test data and pictures of two of our past heat sink designs, one for the Xeon Phi processor heat sink that was used for lab tests by Intel and shown at IDF 2011 and a heat sink for a military project that needed to cool 500 W at 60C ambient.
    The picture shown by doyll is for an Intel Xeon Phi processor. We will put together test data and system pictures on this later this week for reference. This heat sink was shown at the 2011 Intel Developer forum. The Phi processor family are many integrated core processors that are used for high performance computing.

    The 3D image of the SuprCool PC (TM) for i7/AMD processor can be seen at our web site. But yes- all the heat sinks are essentially a pump, radiator and high performance micro channel cold plate. More later today...
    CooLcasetempBob
    We will provide a more detailed explanation of micro channel cooling with some illustrations and reference papers by tomorrow. There is no phase change but yes the micro channels provide very efficient heat transfer from the processor case to the heat sink. That is an important part of how we achieve the performance. As to the 300 W being high, we recently completed a custom engineering heat sink for a military customer that cooled 500W for an array of GaN/GaAs power amplifiers running in an ambient temperature of 60C in about the same size. Of course for that custom engineering project the cost to build was not as challenging as this product. My point is we are very confident that the specification can be made as this is the 6'th project using the same thermal model for the design.

    As to the suggestion for cooling refineries- sorry it won't scale to that level.


    Hi, can you show the results/temps from a prototype on an overclocked system? Maybe, it could be compared to results from here.
    CooLcasetempBob
    We will provide a more detailed explanation of micro channel cooling with some illustrations and reference papers by tomorrow.

    My point is we are very confident that the specification can be made as this is the 6'th project using the same thermal model for the design.



    Piqued my interest......Looking forward to any & all information. :thup: