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View Full Version : when does a person start to feel electricity going through body?



!-=sky=-!
09-15-01, 09:44 AM
topic........
i mean by like what voltage will your body feel

VashTheStampede
09-15-01, 10:09 AM
Not sure if you mean, what voltage does one actually start feeling it, or what exactly. I can only go by experience, when plugging a stereo into a wall socket, I left my finger over one of the metal prongs by accident, started feeling a buzzing sensation, drew my hand back and stared at it while it 'buzzed', the sensation eventually died down. I'm guessing that was 12 volts running through my body.

~RT~

KLowD9x
09-15-01, 10:54 AM
Ive done that before, but that is actually 120 volts. Ive felt electricity at 50 volts with quite a few amps. The most painful ive felt is a 200volt capacitor discharging on my knee (be careful when working with powersupplies that havnt had the time to discharge)

Staz
09-15-01, 11:53 AM
stick a 9v battery to your tounge

Colin
09-15-01, 12:11 PM
The first time I saw my wife. ;)

train22
09-15-01, 12:25 PM
I am guessing your asking this to figure out what is the voltage range when your cpu will fry without you feeling it on your hand. Look at it this way, your cpu will instantly die at 3Vcore or even less while you don't feel the 9V battery when you touch it with your hands (different than mouse)

mark
09-15-01, 12:30 PM
i have done home electric work, on a 110v line, i was connecting the outlet to the lines, and my srewdrivers slipped and shorted the lines. i was kneeling down connecting this, but when it shorted, i was knocked back on my butt, and the screwdriver was all blackend and sparked on, and the plastic had melted.

zap

!-=sky=-!
09-15-01, 12:47 PM
i mean by like current going through the body
when will u start feeling it and when will it blow u up?

sorry for my bad english

Luie
09-15-01, 07:44 PM
you would feel the temperture of the heatsick when it is higher than room temp. if it burns your hand, it would be around or higher than 60 degrees C.

dimmreaper
09-15-01, 08:13 PM
Are we talking AC or DC here? If we are talking AC, are we talking RMS or Peak voltage?

!-=sky=-!
09-15-01, 09:12 PM
DC

snyper1982
09-15-01, 09:24 PM
you should never feel dc going through your body. ac is the one that you will fell not dc. the only way you can ever feel dc is if you are a direct short. i mean at least that what ive always thought. im open to correction though.

Random Nonsense
09-16-01, 11:08 AM
try this: get a multimeter, set it to the 20 Kohm range, hold one probe hard between each thumb and forefinger, and you can feel a slight tingle! i got a resistance of about 9 to 12 Kohm

DAppel
09-16-01, 11:16 AM
"When does a person start to feel electricity going through body? "

Usually when it's too late !!!

oc jason
09-16-01, 12:21 PM
just a reminder much more than 220v and your toast, i have only see 1 person arc out a 440v line and live. ANd i hit 110v working on a light socket, with the 4 foot florescnetn light and it hurt

Random Nonsense
09-16-01, 01:54 PM
when i was unplugging my amplifier to move my PC over to a m8's i got zapped with mains voltage, luckily it was just a bit painful, nothing serious. its current that kills not voltage... static on a monitor is about 30 000v or something, but current is so low it just tingles

*JEREMY*
09-16-01, 02:13 PM
Its funny this came up,couple months ago at work I was plugging in our band saw that runs on 220v and when I did the socket exploded for lack of a better word off of my hand ,I pretty muched blacked out and had to go to the ER for burns to my fingers and I was shaking bad.I actually shorted out the circuit breaker 200' away with my hand!The only thing we can think of is that there was grease on the prongs or something.I still freak out whenever I plug something in now.The doctor did tell me I could have easily died from that though and that I was lucky.

Paul -The Mad Hatter
09-16-01, 02:23 PM
i stuck m finger in where the light bulbs suppose yo go, got a shock from that one.

The Overclocker
09-16-01, 02:25 PM
i was trying to fix my psu a few months ago and accedently toughed the inside when it was on. i blacked out and was shaking for about 5 hours, and had to drink lots of water. it was only 230volts DC

dimmreaper
09-16-01, 04:26 PM
Originally posted by !-=sky=-!
DC 36V can be felt with sufficient amperage (wire 3 car batteries in a series, and feel for yourself)

dimmreaper
09-16-01, 04:30 PM
Originally posted by the overclocker
i was trying to fix my psu a few months ago and accedently toughed the inside when it was on. i blacked out and was shaking for about 5 hours, and had to drink lots of water. it was only 230volts DC Been there done that, Damn those 200V capacitors hurt like a biotch. :D

Kingslayer
09-16-01, 07:49 PM
Originally posted by Colin
The first time I saw my wife. ;)

She was standing over you while you were attempting to read this post wasn't she......


Any ways. You can feel almost any voltage if you put it on the right place. Tape a wire to either end of a 1.5 volt battery and stick it on your tongue, you'll feel that. Don't do it, just take my word for it.....

Wicked Klown
09-17-01, 03:18 AM
I was blown out of the truck of my lowrider when hooking up my amps and thats only 12 volts.

Dougthebug
09-17-01, 03:51 AM
I p*ssed on an electric fence once. I tell ya, it doesn't matter what voltage or how many amps. You get shocked there and it f***ing hurts.

TOMATOMAN
09-17-01, 05:53 AM
Dougthebug u made my day!!

el
09-17-01, 07:22 AM
Well i think the dude is talking about a shocking stuff in his computer adn the little spark you get on dry days is like 20000 volts and the lowest you can feel is around 2000 volts so be careful cuz you can zap small stuff and you won't even feel it sometimes. best to get an ESD strap.

oh and dougthebug all I can say is STIMPY you idiot! Ren and Stimpy had that as a board game. Don't pee on the electrical fence!!!! :)

Amedeo602
09-17-01, 09:44 AM
Originally posted by Dougthebug
I p*ssed on an electric fence once. I tell ya, it doesn't matter what voltage or how many amps. You get shocked there and it f***ing hurts.

u can still have kids though, right? :)

Slain
09-17-01, 08:03 PM
You don't feel the voltage, you feel the electric current.
The resistance of your body to earth and the voltage determine how much current goes into you. (I=V/R)
So the minimum voltage you need to start to feel curent flow depends on your resistance to earth. Thus the voltage is different every time and for every person.

In the case of short circuiting a battery then negative (-) terminal takes the place of the earth.
In the home the neutral wire is actually an earth, in this case the power station earth

CrystalMethod
09-18-01, 01:13 AM
Originally posted by [OC] Jason
just a reminder much more than 220v and your toast, i have only see 1 person arc out a 440v line and live. ANd i hit 110v working on a light socket, with the 4 foot florescnetn light and it hurt

I'm one of the lucky ones. The resistance through my body is low enough that I can handle being jolted by household 220V A/C. And yes I've been careless enough to have let it happen to me once. When I took Electronics & Appliance repair in high school, they made us all take a test to see what our body's resistances were. Mine just happened to be particularly low, hence I don't draw much amperage when you run electricity through me. And NO, I'm not up to testing to see how much you can shock me with before I go flying across the room. Unfortunately i unwittingly tested the theory of the human body being able to withstand 220V A/C and survive a couple of years back. I was wiring in the line for my table saw and pulled the cartrige containing the fuses to the dryer, and stove, instead of the one I had run to the garage months earlier (Moral of the story right here...Double check your work, don't make assumptions...). Me, thinking that I knew which line was which, started connecting the leads. I was holing one lead in my hand, and I remember touching the table saw's top, and then I remember being helped to my feet, about 10' from where the table saw is.

Slain
09-18-01, 08:16 PM
Hehehe just to cheer you up I mentioned this thread to my sister who works in A&E (ER to my US friends) and she said that a current of just 50 mA applied across the heart can stop it. Cheer up it might never happen :D :D :D

The best electical failure I have ever seen was when I was in the navy. Ships along side use a shore power supply this is supplied by three 440V 1000 amp cables. One very rainy day one of these cables laying on the jetty had a insulation faliure. The result one *very* lound bang a flash and about 20 m (60 ft) of the cable jumped 3 m (10ft) feet in the air. Seeing as this cable weighs around 8 kg a meter (6lb a foot) I for one am very glad I was'nt too close :)