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  1. #1
    Disabled Pinky's Avatar
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    Windows DNS, 2003, and IIS issues

    Well, been experiencing some lag on my internet lately. Did a tracert and found the lag started right after info left my cable modem. Have traced it down to my IIS (running FTP) causing the problem, but I don't know how it could be. I know it's IIS or its FTP component because right now no one's connected to my server and everything's fine, but as soon as someone does the internet lag starts.

    On the 2003 server I have DNS running, and I host a local domain. Without DNS it takes forever for my PC(s) to find the domain and its resources, so removing DNS (the possible culprit) isn't really an option.

    So I'm hoping someone has seen something similar to this...

    Is there a reverse lookup I need to add?

  2. #2
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    If it only happens when people connect, is it possible that, when someone's connected, it's eating up all your bandwidth and thus lagging? What does your network look like and is using QoS an option?

    -Brian

  3. #3
    Disabled Pinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bth
    If it only happens when people connect, is it possible that, when someone's connected, it's eating up all your bandwidth and thus lagging? What does your network look like and is using QoS an option?

    -Brian
    When you do a tracert it's only a response-time test. Roadrunner regulates/limits the upload bandwith from my home network, so I'm 100% sure that the connected user is eating most of it. How this would cause the lag is beyond me, because surfing I'm only downloading which is independent from uploading.

    QoS?

    Cable modem --> Router --> PCs and server (LAN)

    LAN is working fine, it's just when someone connects to the FTP portion of the server that ALL internet connectivity (not just on the server, also on the workstations) slows. Ping responses jump from 6ms to 1500ms for anything outside of my LAN. Within the LAN everything continues to run fine.

  4. #4
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    Hi Pinky,

    Yep, capping out the bandwidth is the likely culprit. There's a few possible reasons for the lag: First, even though you're downloading only, you will have some upstream bandwidth for responses. Those packets are competing with the FTP (or other) traffic coming from your network. It's exaggerated a little in traceroutes because by default, ICMP is the lowest priority.

    You'll see this in any situation as long as you're filling up your pipe. A few ways around this: if your router supports QoS, try plugging your server into one of the ports and set that entire port to the _lowest_ priority (or do QoS some other way, such as setting that IP in the router to the lowest priority, etc.)

    Another idea is just throttle the bandwidth at the server. I never played with bandwidth throttling in IIS too much (back in v4 days it didn't work too well) but I have played with it w/ servers like ServU. Just set it to something like 1/2 or 3/4 of your entire bandwidth...

    The QoS is a bit better of a solution b/c it will allow your entire pipe to be used while you don't need it, otherwise it will throttle itself to your other machine...

  5. #5
    Disabled Pinky's Avatar
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    Okay, I'll look into the QoS and possible IIS throttle and see if that's it. This would definitely explain the problem.

  6. #6
    Disabled Pinky's Avatar
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    Okay - the router does not have QoS and enabling this on the server probably isn't going to help (did read a bit about how QoS works, so you're correct that it would need to be implimented o nthe router ). I did install QoS on the server anyway.

    Other issue is that I couldn't find the bandwidth controls in IIS. It's available for web sites but not FTP...

    **edit - it seems that enabling the bandwidth throttle in the web section also limits the FTP, but I'm still looking to verify this...***
    Last edited by Pinky; 07-12-05 at 12:47 AM.

  7. #7
    Disabled Pinky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinky
    Okay - the router does not have QoS and enabling this on the server probably isn't going to help (did read a bit about how QoS works, so you're correct that it would need to be implimented o nthe router ). I did install QoS on the server anyway.

    Other issue is that I couldn't find the bandwidth controls in IIS. It's available for web sites but not FTP...
    Any other suggestions? FTP isn't limited by the website bandwidth throttle, and QoS won't work since it's not available on the router.

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