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  1. #1
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    Question Bits, Bytes, Megabits and Megabytes

    Is this correct?

    2Megabit = 2,048,000 Bit = 2,048 K Bit = 256 K Byte = 0.25 M Byte

    In relation to data transfer from ftp source > ftp receiver.
    Last edited by Jleo; 09-30-05 at 08:54 AM.

  2. #2
    In SI units 2 megabits = 2000 kilobits = 2,000,000 bits = 250000 bytes = 250 kilobytes = .25 Megabytes

    Under windows 2 megabits = 2000 kilobits = 2,000,000 bits = 250,000 bytes = 244.14 kilobytes = .2384 Megabytes

  3. #3
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    Wink Under Windows

    My Windows has both Si and Binary equivalent
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  4. #4
    Senior Django-loving Member Captain Newbie's Avatar
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    Many (or at least the one at cs.dolphin.csuci) scientific circles have taken to writing megabytes, in the sense of decimal million bytes, as MB, kilobytes in the sense of decimal thousand bytes as KB, etc., and the binary forms as MiB ("binary million bytes"), ...

    More information.

    In my opinion, it's more cricket to write the binary millions/thousands/... because that's what the computer sees. Oh, and in the past, that's what KB and MB meant.
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  5. #5
    Jleo, windows does not have both. Try looking at the properties of a file that is more than a megabyte, then more than a gigabyte.

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jleo
    My Windows has both Si and Binary equivalent
    WELCOME TO THE FORUMS!

  8. #8
    Senior Django-loving Member Captain Newbie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Incesticide
    Jleo, windows does not have both. Try looking at the properties of a file that is more than a megabyte, then more than a gigabyte.
    Also correct. It wouldn't make much sense if Windows did have both, since

    1) It would confuse the user
    2) It _might_ confuse the file management/disk management subsystem.

    Windows uses the binary sense of KB/MB, as in 1024bytes = 1K(i)B and 4096bytes = 4K(i)B...This is why a quote-on-quote 120GB hard drive has less than 120GB available in Windows.
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  9. #9
    Member dittohead's Avatar
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  10. #10
    I don't know why you use the term quote-on-quote for hard drives showing less than their rated capacity in windows. This is an issue with windows, not the drive. The 120GB drive does in fact have 120 billion bytes of storage available. In linux, the drive space is reported just fine, as is the case with macintosh computers. Must I mention unix as well?

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