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Thread: virgin oc'er

  1. #1
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    Question virgin oc'er

    Hello

    I am new to overclocking, but not new to using/building my own pc's for a long time now. Just never had enough motivation to OC I guess. But now I would like to try it out with your help

    I am becoming very interested in how to overclock my system to squeeze some more performance out of it. I run XP Home SP2, and Vista Ultimate on this machine.

    I was hoping someone out here can get me started down the right path.

    Main System Specs are:
    > Asus P5B-E
    > 2 GB Kingston value RAM PC2 6400 - running in dual channel mode
    > ATI Brand XTX1950X 512MB RAM
    > Pentium 4 Presler D945 (3.4 Ghz x 2) Dual Core CPU
    > Raptor 10,000 RPM Primary Drive -150 GB model
    > Antec 900 Gaming Case
    > ZALMAN CNPS9500 AT 2 Ball CPU Cooling Fan/Heatsink
    > SILVERSTONE SST-ST50EF ATX 12V 2.2 500W Power Supply


    Basically I was hoping I could start off by using the AI Suite from ASUS to help me do some over clocking. Instread of doing it via the BIOS.

    Can anyone spare a little time to help me learn how to do this with my P5B-E? If I could get a 10% to 25% speed increase that would be awesome.

    I did some forum searching here, but didnt find a guide for the P5B-E.


    BTW, I think get a 5.0 Windows Experience rating, and ratings are 5.0, 5.6, 5.9, 5,8, 5.5

    The 5.0 is because of the CPU.

    I also noticed the Catalyst software has a tweaker program to speed up the video processing speed. So I started fooling around with that a little bit.

    Alos, I am not against buying the faster CPU for this, but I would rather see what kind of performance I can get out of current CPU, and make sure its still rock solid realiability. I am not looking for fastest settings, but just faster + realiable.

    Thank you for any help...
    Last edited by argniest; 08-05-07 at 05:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    Primarily written on a P5B Dl I believe but should be pretty similar
    http://forums.hexus.net/showthread.php?t=103676

  3. #3
    Vento1's Avatar
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    to the forums argniest. The above link is a good place to start any specific probs ask and some one will answer.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vento1
    to the forums argniest. The above link is a good place to start any specific probs ask and some one will answer.
    Thanks for info. I read over the guide, it does seem very good, but unfortunately to a total overclocking noob like me, I am still lacking confidence to mess with some of these things. I really like my machine...its the best I have built so far (and rock solid)....but I also want to make it faster double edge sword I know. Also, I have the Pentium D 945 (3.4 Ghz) and not a Duo Core. Not sure how much that matters...

    A question:
    If I just increase FSB settings of the CPU (from the Asus AiSuite program)...will the RAM speed also be increased automatically? I am not sure about that. I was thinking if I could just oc the CPU by itself and see how that goes first. But if the Asus P5B-e is smart enough to recognize that I manually adjusted the FSB speed, and then goes and changes my RAM speed...I just want to be careful when I take my first steps. I read that the RAM is sensitive and easy(ier) to fry out. Just wondering how those two are interconnected. And if its OK to use the AiSuite vs. going into BIOS for my first time.

    There are just sooo many things to change in the bios and so many things for me to learn. I was hoping I can just use AiSuite for my first OC attempts. Since ASUS went to the trouble of providing it to me.

    Thank you again!

  5. #5
    Senior Moment batboy's Avatar
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    First, the Pentium D 945 is indeed a dual core, just not a Core 2 Duo.

    Honestly, the quickest and easiest way to increase performance is get a Core 2 Duo.

    Ok, that said, I recommend learning with what you got first. RAM is pretty tough and doesn't fry that easy. Just overclocking will not hurt RAM. If you go too far, the RAM might cause the system to be unstable, but if that happens, just back off a little.

    The number one cause of frying components is overvolting. Number two is overheating. So, as long as you don't go crazy with the voltage and as long as you have adequate cooling, the risk is basically nil. Fortunately, most systems can O/C quite a bit with low voltage and modest cooling.

    Yes, as you raise FSB, the memory will get overclocked too. If you have not changed the memory ratio to manual in the BIOS (in other words, if it's still set to auto), then the system will automatically set the memory to a safe level. I would not worry about that right now.

    Sooner or later, if you play with overclocking enough, the system will lock up and fail to reboot. Don't panic, we've all been there. Just reset the CMOS by moving the jumper. The motherboard instruction manual will be your best friend at that point. Good luck.
    2600K, Asus P8P67 Deluxe, 2X2GB G.Skill Pi PC3-2133, PC & Cooling 750W
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by batboy
    Honestly, the quickest and easiest way to increase performance is get a Core 2 Duo.
    Maybe once I get some experience with my current CPU and see how much faster it is (or not)...I will upgrade to a Core 2 Duo or maybe a Quad Core with a G0 stepping. But as you mentioned, it will be good to just experiment with what I have now

    Quote Originally Posted by batboy
    The number one cause of frying components is overvolting.
    So when I increase the FSB setting either in BIOS or via the AI Suite program, is that increasing the voltage too? I am not sure exactly how those things are related. I know thats an ignorant question...but I AM brand new to this part about computers.

    Quote Originally Posted by batboy
    Number two is overheating. So, as long as you don't go crazy with the voltage and as long as you have adequate cooling, the risk is basically nil. Fortunately, most systems can O/C quite a bit with low voltage and modest cooling.
    Well ever since I upgraded to the Antec 900 Gaming case, and added the Zalman fan, the temperatures went way down. And it lives in the basement which is a lot cooler than rest of the house. So it should not having cooling problems I hope.

    Quote Originally Posted by batboy
    Yes, as you raise FSB, the memory will get overclocked too. If you have not changed the memory ratio to manual in the BIOS (in other words, if it's still set to auto), then the system will automatically set the memory to a safe level. I would not worry about that right now.
    That is interesting. How does the BIOS know what to set the RAM speed too? As you change the FSB speed higher and higher? Im just curious how that works.

    Quote Originally Posted by batboy
    Sooner or later, if you play with overclocking enough, the system will lock up and fail to reboot. Don't panic, we've all been there. Just reset the CMOS by moving the jumper. The motherboard instruction manual will be your best friend at that point. Good luck.
    I dont mind having to do that. I plan on being careful and taking it slowly my first time around. I am not in a hurry here. So I can slowly raise the FSB speed for starters...and then go back and see how stable system is.

    I already decided to use AI Suite to bump up the FSB to 210 from the 200 setting. And the overall Mhz went from 2410 to 2505. I am not sure where to check the speed of the RAM or how to know that it is increasing also. Maybe I saw that information in the CPU ID program tonight...I cant remember for sure though.

    Thanks again!

  7. #7
    Senior Moment batboy's Avatar
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    I don't know if your Asus AI increases voltage or not. Hopefully, an Asus pro will hop in here to help us out. The Abit uGuru overclocking program, which is similar I think, does not increase voltage unless you change it. You should have a temp and voltage monitoring program that can be installed off the Asus install CD. Check voltages (vcore and RAM mainly) at default speed and at an overclocked speed. See if the voltages are about the same.

    As you start overclocking, at some point you'll hit a wall and can't go any higher without the system becoming unstable. As long as your temps are ok, raising voltage a little can usually improve stability and allow you to overclock higher. I can guarantee your PD 945 can safely handle 1.4v with no problem. Most RAM can handle 2.0v to 2.1v with ease.

    Ok, RAM speed. To check it, download a free program called CPU-Z. The first screen that pops up gives you CPU info. Click on the memory tab and see what memory ratio is running and what frequency. At your default 200 FSB, the mobo might auto set the ratio to 1:2 (400 MHz) which means your RAM is running in spec. There is a ROM on the RAM that provides the system with timing SPD and the DDR2 speed rating (DDR2-800 in your situation). Let's say you raise your FSB to 300 (probably not likely with your system, but bear with me, it's an example). The BIOS will auto set the RAM to the 3:4 ratio to keep the frequency at 400 MHz. If you go a little higher, like 310 FSB, the memory ratio will drop down again. Us overclockers usually prefer to manually set the ratio for full control, but for you just starting out, keep it simple until you learn more and leave it on auto. Same with the timings for now.
    Last edited by batboy; 08-05-07 at 11:26 PM.
    2600K, Asus P8P67 Deluxe, 2X2GB G.Skill Pi PC3-2133, PC & Cooling 750W
    watercooled: Eheim 1048 pump, Swiftech Apogee GTX and 2X120mm rad
    FS020 case, OCZ SSD, Sapphire HD 6950, Acer X241W 24" widescreen

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by batboy
    I don't know if your Asus AI increases voltage or not. Hopefully, an Asus pro will hop in here to help us out. The Abit uGuru overclocking program, which is similar I think, does not increase voltage unless you change it. You should have a temp and voltage monitoring program that can be installed off the Asus install CD. Check voltages (vcore and RAM mainly) at default speed and at an overclocked speed. See if the voltages are about the same.

    As you start overclocking, at some point you'll hit a wall and can't go any higher without the system becoming unstable. As long as your temps are ok, raising voltage a little can usually improve stability and allow you to overclock higher. I can guarantee your PD 945 can safely handle 1.4v with no problem. Most RAM can handle 2.0v to 2.1v with ease.

    Ok, RAM speed. To check it, download a free program called CPU-Z. The first screen that pops up gives you CPU info. Click on the memory tab and see what memory ratio is running and what frequency. At your default 200 FSB, the mobo might auto set the ratio to 1:2 (400 MHz) which means your RAM is running in spec. There is a ROM on the RAM that provides the system with timing SPD and the DDR2 speed rating (DDR2-800 in your situation). Let's say you raise your FSB to 300 (probably not likely with your system, but bear with me, it's an example). The BIOS will auto set the RAM to the 3:4 ratio to keep the frequency at 400 MHz. If you go a little higher, like 310 FSB, the memory ratio will drop down again. Us overclockers usually prefer to manually set the ratio for full control, but for you just starting out, keep it simple until you learn more and leave it on auto. Same with the timings for now.
    Yes! CPU-Z is a must!

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  9. #9
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    OK, I downloaded and ran the CPU-Z. I would like to post a few screenshots of the screens, and if you dont mind then we can discuss specifics about my system. I am curious how this RAM speed will change (if it does) when I am using AI Suite.

    I will take screenshots before and after. I already bumped up the FSB setting to 210. And it was before I did a screenshot. So I guess I should really reset back to default of 200, take a screenshot of the CPU and RAM information tabs...and then go from there. I just want to take baby steps at first. This is fun

    Thanks

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