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  1. #1
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    6700k Core #1 around 30* cooler than the rest?

    This doesn't add up. OC'd to 4.8 ghz, DVID set to 0.015V. I was planning on stress testing for some time, then call it done 30 min into prime95 for the max setting (4.8GHz). It will be dropped down to 4.6 for daily driving, but I did notice something very odd:



    I'll be doing this a few more times to see if I can see some patterns, but so far it's doing ok in OCCT. Maybe linpack will help the weaknesses surface?
    CPU: i7-6700k
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170X G1 Gaming 6
    Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX
    RAM: 1x16 gb G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 DDR4
    GPU: Nvidia GEForce GTX1080
    Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro
    PSU: Corsair RM850x
    Storage: Kingston Digital 120GB SSDNow V300
    Seagate 3TB BarraCuda
    OS: Windows 10

  2. #2
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Well, haven't been able to replicate this. Hopefully this was a glitch in HWMonitor, and I already dialed DVID down to 0.00 and core clock to 4.7 (so far it's happy).
    CPU: i7-6700k
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170X G1 Gaming 6
    Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX
    RAM: 1x16 gb G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 DDR4
    GPU: Nvidia GEForce GTX1080
    Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro
    PSU: Corsair RM850x
    Storage: Kingston Digital 120GB SSDNow V300
    Seagate 3TB BarraCuda
    OS: Windows 10

  3. #3
    Senior Member trents's Avatar
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    My suspicion is that during the original Prime95 stress test one of the working threads dropped out because it generated an error but the others kept going. Make sure all threads are visible in Prime95. Used to be that when one thread threw an error the little Prime95 icon at the top of that thread window would turn from green to read. In the newer versions of Prime they don't turn color and it's easy to miss.

    I've started using OCCT instead of Prime95 as when there is an error you get a "quack" sound and the whole thing just terminates. The intensity of the OCCT stress test when using Large Data Set is pretty much the same as it is in Prime95 and there are temp and voltage graphs displayed. Plus, you can set it to run for a given amount of time which I really like. There is also a Linpack with AVX instruction set stress testing option in OCCT. I run the OCCT large data set for 3 hr. to confirm stability.
    CPU: i5-7600k@4.8ghz
    Motherboard: ASRock Z270 Killer SLI/ac
    Cooler: Custom loop with Swiftech MCP50X pump, EK-Spremacy Evo block, Koolance 360x29mm 30 fins per in. radiator, 38x120mm 4000rpm Delta fans on Sunbeam Rheobus Extreme fan speed controller
    RAM: 2x8 gb Crucial 2400 Ballistic DDR4
    GPU: 2xMSI Armor Rx 480 4 gb in Crossfire X/ 1080p Asus monitor
    Case: NZXT Source 530
    PSU: OCZ 750W
    Storage: Segate 480 gb SSD + 1x1tb spinner
    OS: Windows 10

    Jesus said, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father but through me." John 14:6

  4. Thanks!

    R_Pierce (03-16-17)

  5. #4
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trents View Post
    My suspicion is that during the original Prime95 stress test one of the working threads dropped out because it generated an error but the others kept going. Make sure all threads are visible in Prime95. Used to be that when one thread threw an error the little Prime95 icon at the top of that thread window would turn from green to read. In the newer versions of Prime they don't turn color and it's easy to miss.

    I've started using OCCT instead of Prime95 as when there is an error you get a "quack" sound and the whole thing just terminates. The intensity of the OCCT stress test when using Large Data Set is pretty much the same as it is in Prime95 and there are temp and voltage graphs displayed. Plus, you can set it to run for a given amount of time which I really like. There is also a Linpack with AVX instruction set stress testing option in OCCT. I run the OCCT large data set for 3 hr. to confirm stability.
    Thanks, will do! I usually run OCCT, but was under the impression it wasn't as hard on the components as p95. Good to know that it's basically the same.

  6. #5
    Senior Member trents's Avatar
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    I should clarify what I said. The OCCT Large Data set test gives approximately the same intensity of stress test as an older version of Prime95 with AVX1 like, for instance, v. 27.7. The newer versions of Prime95 with AVX2 instruction sets make way more heat.

    I think you will find that if you have enough vcore to pass 3 hr. of OCCT large data set you will not have any problem with the system being unstable in real life apps.
    CPU: i5-7600k@4.8ghz
    Motherboard: ASRock Z270 Killer SLI/ac
    Cooler: Custom loop with Swiftech MCP50X pump, EK-Spremacy Evo block, Koolance 360x29mm 30 fins per in. radiator, 38x120mm 4000rpm Delta fans on Sunbeam Rheobus Extreme fan speed controller
    RAM: 2x8 gb Crucial 2400 Ballistic DDR4
    GPU: 2xMSI Armor Rx 480 4 gb in Crossfire X/ 1080p Asus monitor
    Case: NZXT Source 530
    PSU: OCZ 750W
    Storage: Segate 480 gb SSD + 1x1tb spinner
    OS: Windows 10

    Jesus said, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father but through me." John 14:6

  7. #6
    Member Tgrable's Avatar
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    I'm not sure no one else has pointed this out, but there is no way I would recommend running at those temps regardless You are over 90c and hitting 100c max on a few of the cores. While these chips don't throttle until 100c being in that area also has a high risk of degrading your chip. I would try to get temps under 80c if at all possible.

    Not sure what Cooler you are using, but if you want to continue on this path I would definately upgrade it.

    Also to the temp variance it could be several things. One being P95 errors on 1 or both of the threads for that core.. so temps would drop. Second it could be something as simple as a faulty sensor or having several temp programs running at once which are causing issues with one another. Lastly it could be the application of your TIM or a issue with the gap/TIM between die and IHS. I have personally encountered all 3 of these issues at one point or another and can attest to them causing this type of issue. The latter of the 3 though I only noticed about a 12c difference on though.
    System 1 - 7700k , 32gb ddr4 3200, 960gb m.2 Intel 6 , 512gb Samsung 840 pro, 4x 2tb hybrid drives , Evga 1080 Classified, AX1200i , H220x + swifteck plexi res and additional xspa 240mm rad.

    System 2 - 2600k 4.8 ghz. 2x 780ti classifieds , 16 gb ddr 3 1800 , hyper 212 , 256 gb Samsung 840 pro, 3tb 7200 hd , 1000w BFG psu (miss BFG - made some amazing stuff)

  8. #7
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trents View Post
    I should clarify what I said. The OCCT Large Data set test gives approximately the same intensity of stress test as an older version of Prime95 with AVX1 like, for instance, v. 27.7. The newer versions of Prime95 with AVX2 instruction sets make way more heat.

    I think you will find that if you have enough vcore to pass 3 hr. of OCCT large data set you will not have any problem with the system being unstable in real life apps.
    Thank you, sir. I have to do some nore adjustments to the vcore since I keep getting BSODs in the middle of p95 (I thought p95 would crash before a bsod, nice to be in the ballpark for once), but I will do that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tgrable View Post
    I'm not sure no one else has pointed this out, but there is no way I would recommend running at those temps regardless You are over 90c and hitting 100c max on a few of the cores. While these chips don't throttle until 100c being in that area also has a high risk of degrading your chip. I would try to get temps under 80c if at all possible.

    Not sure what Cooler you are using, but if you want to continue on this path I would definately upgrade it.

    Also to the temp variance it could be several things. One being P95 errors on 1 or both of the threads for that core.. so temps would drop. Second it could be something as simple as a faulty sensor or having several temp programs running at once which are causing issues with one another. Lastly it could be the application of your TIM or a issue with the gap/TIM between die and IHS. I have personally encountered all 3 of these issues at one point or another and can attest to them causing this type of issue. The latter of the 3 though I only noticed about a 12c difference on though.
    Yeah I was running stupid high voltages because I'm still figuring out DVID on this mobo. With the bios update, DVID doesn't work the same, so I'm back to using regular voltage adjustment.

  9. #8
    Senior Member trents's Avatar
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    All of the stress testing programs can trigger BSOD sometimes. In myexperience, that is most likely to happen when vcore is significantly lower than needed for stability when running the stress test you are using. If the vcore is close to providing stability then you might get system lockup or just notification in some way from the testing program itself that you failed it.
    CPU: i5-7600k@4.8ghz
    Motherboard: ASRock Z270 Killer SLI/ac
    Cooler: Custom loop with Swiftech MCP50X pump, EK-Spremacy Evo block, Koolance 360x29mm 30 fins per in. radiator, 38x120mm 4000rpm Delta fans on Sunbeam Rheobus Extreme fan speed controller
    RAM: 2x8 gb Crucial 2400 Ballistic DDR4
    GPU: 2xMSI Armor Rx 480 4 gb in Crossfire X/ 1080p Asus monitor
    Case: NZXT Source 530
    PSU: OCZ 750W
    Storage: Segate 480 gb SSD + 1x1tb spinner
    OS: Windows 10

    Jesus said, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father but through me." John 14:6

  10. #9
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trents View Post
    All of the stress testing programs can trigger BSOD sometimes. In myexperience, that is most likely to happen when vcore is significantly lower than needed for stability when running the stress test you are using. If the vcore is close to providing stability then you might get system lockup or just notification in some way from the testing program itself that you failed it.
    Thanks for the info! Some more news: 1.425V and 4.7ghz so far, OCCT failed at 30 min mark due to error in core 3. Another thing I noticed between this CPU and the one that was replaced is that the stress testing apps can actually communicate with it to figure out where the error was (which core, sometimes even the cause of the error). That last CPU would just error out, and that's it. P95 would not even bother running for more than 5 seconds.

  11. #10
    You are fine at 90c it will throttle the clock speed at 100c to keep it in the safe limit and Intel will shut down the processor 120c to prevent damage.
    i5 6600K OC 4.5GHz
    Cooler Master Hyper 212
    Motherboard Gigabyte Z170-HD3
    G.SKILL Ripjaws v 16GB F4-3200C14D-16GVK XMP Speed 3200 CL 14-14-14-34
    EVGA Black Edition Superclocked GTX 1070

  12. #11
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingman99 View Post
    You are fine at 90c it will throttle the clock speed at 100c to keep it in the safe limit and Intel will shut down the processor 120c to prevent damage.
    Thank you! Just had this happen again, but at 4.6 ghz. Same difference, just lower temps.

  13. #12
    Senior Member trents's Avatar
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    I would not run the CPU 24/7 at anything greater than 1.4 vcore. I think you need to back off on your overclock. It doesn't look like you won the silicon lottery and you need to find the sweet spot for that CPU. You might need to settle for 4.4-4.5 ghz for daily use.
    CPU: i5-7600k@4.8ghz
    Motherboard: ASRock Z270 Killer SLI/ac
    Cooler: Custom loop with Swiftech MCP50X pump, EK-Spremacy Evo block, Koolance 360x29mm 30 fins per in. radiator, 38x120mm 4000rpm Delta fans on Sunbeam Rheobus Extreme fan speed controller
    RAM: 2x8 gb Crucial 2400 Ballistic DDR4
    GPU: 2xMSI Armor Rx 480 4 gb in Crossfire X/ 1080p Asus monitor
    Case: NZXT Source 530
    PSU: OCZ 750W
    Storage: Segate 480 gb SSD + 1x1tb spinner
    OS: Windows 10

    Jesus said, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father but through me." John 14:6

  14. #13
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trents View Post
    I would not run the CPU 24/7 at anything greater than 1.4 vcore. I think you need to back off on your overclock. It doesn't look like you won the silicon lottery and you need to find the sweet spot for that CPU. You might need to settle for 4.4-4.5 ghz for daily use.
    Yeah, it's not looking like I'll be able to run anything more than that. I also kept getting an error at core #3 in OCCT, and after updating to 4.5.0, it stopped testing altogether. Prime95 still works, though, but it keeps finding errors as well. One bad CPU is just bad luck. Two bad CPUs can still be attributed to bad luck, but three? Either I'm cursed, or the quality control at Intel has dropped off...

  15. #14
    Member Tgrable's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surensm View Post
    Yeah, it's not looking like I'll be able to run anything more than that. I also kept getting an error at core #3 in OCCT, and after updating to 4.5.0, it stopped testing altogether. Prime95 still works, though, but it keeps finding errors as well. One bad CPU is just bad luck. Two bad CPUs can still be attributed to bad luck, but three? Either I'm cursed, or the quality control at Intel has dropped off...
    I would go with option 3 on that. Intel hasn't had real competition for a while and haven't really been pushed to be better. Ryzen is close enough it should help with that though.

    The problem with these chips is the cheap TIM and Uneven silicon bead they run to secure the IHS to the chip. That is why people who delid are seeing such massive gains. I know on my own delid the silicon looked excellent but I had huge air pockets in the TIM they used.

    So while I would never recommend that anyone delids because of the inherent risks involved it does give you a little more thermal headroom and that headroom can make a previous unstable OC stable just because of how temps can affect leakage etc.
    System 1 - 7700k , 32gb ddr4 3200, 960gb m.2 Intel 6 , 512gb Samsung 840 pro, 4x 2tb hybrid drives , Evga 1080 Classified, AX1200i , H220x + swifteck plexi res and additional xspa 240mm rad.

    System 2 - 2600k 4.8 ghz. 2x 780ti classifieds , 16 gb ddr 3 1800 , hyper 212 , 256 gb Samsung 840 pro, 3tb 7200 hd , 1000w BFG psu (miss BFG - made some amazing stuff)

  16. #15
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tgrable View Post
    I would go with option 3 on that. Intel hasn't had real competition for a while and haven't really been pushed to be better. Ryzen is close enough it should help with that though.

    The problem with these chips is the cheap TIM and Uneven silicon bead they run to secure the IHS to the chip. That is why people who delid are seeing such massive gains. I know on my own delid the silicon looked excellent but I had huge air pockets in the TIM they used.

    So while I would never recommend that anyone delids because of the inherent risks involved it does give you a little more thermal headroom and that headroom can make a previous unstable OC stable just because of how temps can affect leakage etc.
    Right, delidding is a whole another ball game that I'm about as familiar with as I am with underwater welding (I can weld, but definitely not underwater lol). Is the silicone something that can be reapplied?

  17. #16
    Member Tgrable's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by surensm View Post
    Right, delidding is a whole another ball game that I'm about as familiar with as I am with underwater welding (I can weld, but definitely not underwater lol). Is the silicone something that can be reapplied?
    Yes, I used RTV Gasket maker for example, but others have just used the locking mechanism to hold things in place or even resorted to super glue (Would not advise the use of super glue though).

    Then again delidding is not for the faint of heart and if done incorrectly can render a chip useless. So if you do decide to go that route make sure to get the right tools and do plenty of research.
    System 1 - 7700k , 32gb ddr4 3200, 960gb m.2 Intel 6 , 512gb Samsung 840 pro, 4x 2tb hybrid drives , Evga 1080 Classified, AX1200i , H220x + swifteck plexi res and additional xspa 240mm rad.

    System 2 - 2600k 4.8 ghz. 2x 780ti classifieds , 16 gb ddr 3 1800 , hyper 212 , 256 gb Samsung 840 pro, 3tb 7200 hd , 1000w BFG psu (miss BFG - made some amazing stuff)

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by surensm View Post
    Yeah, it's not looking like I'll be able to run anything more than that. I also kept getting an error at core #3 in OCCT, and after updating to 4.5.0, it stopped testing altogether. Prime95 still works, though, but it keeps finding errors as well. One bad CPU is just bad luck. Two bad CPUs can still be attributed to bad luck, but three? Either I'm cursed, or the quality control at Intel has dropped off...
    Overclocking is not guarantee, that is why it's called overclockign. Average overclock for skylake is 4.5GHz. overclocking quality control , Intel does not give a s*** about overclocking.
    i5 6600K OC 4.5GHz
    Cooler Master Hyper 212
    Motherboard Gigabyte Z170-HD3
    G.SKILL Ripjaws v 16GB F4-3200C14D-16GVK XMP Speed 3200 CL 14-14-14-34
    EVGA Black Edition Superclocked GTX 1070

  19. #18
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingman99 View Post
    Overclocking is not guarantee, that is why it's called overclockign. Average overclock for skylake is 4.5GHz. overclocking quality control , Intel does not give a s*** about overclocking.
    Never said "overclocking quality control", go back and read my original comment. I was talking about overall quality control.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tgrable View Post
    Yes, I used RTV Gasket maker for example, but others have just used the locking mechanism to hold things in place or even resorted to super glue (Would not advise the use of super glue though).

    Then again delidding is not for the faint of heart and if done incorrectly can render a chip useless. So if you do decide to go that route make sure to get the right tools and do plenty of research.
    Yeah, going to pass on delidding, and just stick to 4.6 ghz for now. Thanks!
    CPU: i7-6700k
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170X G1 Gaming 6
    Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX
    RAM: 1x16 gb G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 DDR4
    GPU: Nvidia GEForce GTX1080
    Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro
    PSU: Corsair RM850x
    Storage: Kingston Digital 120GB SSDNow V300
    Seagate 3TB BarraCuda
    OS: Windows 10

  20. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by surensm View Post
    Never said "overclocking quality control", go back and read my original comment. I was talking about overall quality control.



    Yeah, going to pass on delidding, and just stick to 4.6 ghz for now. Thanks!
    What was bad about the 3 CPUs?
    i5 6600K OC 4.5GHz
    Cooler Master Hyper 212
    Motherboard Gigabyte Z170-HD3
    G.SKILL Ripjaws v 16GB F4-3200C14D-16GVK XMP Speed 3200 CL 14-14-14-34
    EVGA Black Edition Superclocked GTX 1070

  21. #20
    Registered surensm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wingman99 View Post
    What was bad about the 3 CPUs?
    Not sure about the specific issues with this current one (assuming there is one, but I'm getting quite a few errors and one of the cores occasionally doesn't want to function), but the one before this was about as stable as an elephant trying to do a vertical on a mattress, and the first one was constantly overheating. Mind you, I never had issues overclocking with a 775 socket back in the day, and had a stable overclock all day on both my Pentium Q and my Core 2 Quad.
    CPU: i7-6700k
    Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170X G1 Gaming 6
    Cooler: Corsair H100i GTX
    RAM: 1x16 gb G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 DDR4
    GPU: Nvidia GEForce GTX1080
    Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro
    PSU: Corsair RM850x
    Storage: Kingston Digital 120GB SSDNow V300
    Seagate 3TB BarraCuda
    OS: Windows 10

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