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  1. #1
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    Apr 2017

    [Total Noob] Overclocking 7700K - Where to begin?

    So I built this system and want to do a general use basic overclock, I have extensive computer experience but have never overclocked before

    CPU: Intel Core i7 7700K
    Motherboard: ASUS Strix Z270E
    RAM: 16GB G. Skill Trident Z 3000MHz (8GBx2)
    Cooler: Corsair H100iv2
    GPU: EVGA GTX1080 SC
    SSD: Samsung 960Evo Pro m.2 500GB
    HDD: Seagate Barracuda Pro 6TB
    PSU: EVGA G3 Supernova 650W
    Case: NZXT S340 Elite

    I used the Asus EZ tuner which gives me these values in ROG CPU-Z:



    I'm just having a feeling the voltage on that is a bit too high. I ran AIDA64 for an hour (Stress mode) and my average temps were 67-70 C although I saw max temps of around 81-82 C on some cores. My CPU idles at 35 C with that overclock.

    Can anyone help please?

  2. #2
    Senior Member trents's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Centralia, WA
    First, in addition to CPU-z which you already have installed, download and install HWMonitor and OCCT (a stress testing program). HWMonitor gives a lot detailed information about current, maximum and minimum voltages. Whenever you overclock you need monitor maximum package temp while stress testing for stability.

    Second, to your posted image of the CPU-z screen tab, please add images of the "Memory" and the "SPD" tab.

    Third, your core VID 1.359 looks like it might be higher than needed to get to 4.7 ghz. Tuner Wizards and Genies like EZ Tune usually assign more volts than necessary and often also unnecessarily down clock the memory. Disable EZ Tune.

    Fourth, go into bios and reset all values to "optimized defaults." Usually this can be done with one of the "F" keys, F7 maybe.

    Then go into the Overclock Tweaker's tab and set the overclock mode to manual and for "all cores." Increase the default core ratio multiplier by a 1X increment. Set the memory frequency to "XMP."

    Open HWMonitor on the desktop.

    After each 1x increment increase, stress test for 20 minutes with OCCT (Large Data set). Observe package temps. You want them to stay under 90c maximum during stress testing. Repeat this process until your core ratio is too high on stock voltage to pass the 20 minute OCCT stress test.

    Add .01 to the CPU core voltage (what we call "vcore") and repeat the stress test. Add more core voltage if you need to in order to pass the stress test. As you climb higher in the overclock, each increment of CPU speed increase will require more voltage to get stable or package temps get too high (90c max). You will reach a point where either voltage or temps become too high for safety.

    Conventional wisdom is that for 24/7 running, a 1.4 vcore is the max safe amount.

    When you hit either the max temp or voltage wall, increase the OCCT stress test time to 3 hr. If you can't pass the three hour test, back down on the core ratio one notch and retest. That should give you your max overclock.
    CPU: i5-7600k@4.8ghz
    Motherboard: ASRock Z270 Killer SLI/ac
    Cooler: Custom loop with Swiftech MCP50X pump, EK-Spremacy Evo block, Koolance 360x29mm 30 fins per in. radiator, 38x120mm 4000rpm Delta fans on Sunbeam Rheobus Extreme fan speed controller
    RAM: 2x8 gb Crucial 2400 Ballistic DDR4
    GPU: XFX Rx480 8gb/1080p Asus monitor
    Case: NZXT Source 530
    PSU: OCZ 750W
    Storage: Segate 480 gb SSD + 1x1tb spinner
    OS: Windows 10

    Jesus said, "I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father but through me." John 14:6

  3. #3
    Benching Team Leader
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    Johan45's Avatar
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    Dec 2012
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    Ontario,Canada
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    We don't really recommend the Auto tuners. Typically they set the voltage too high and some will drop your ram speed. I would clear it out so it won't apply an OC at startup. Go to BIOS and set defaults, then reboot. Then I would set the XMP and reboot again to BIOS. At this point try setting 1.3V manually and the x47 multiplier. Boot to windows. If it doesn't boot you'll need more voltage if it does then try a stability test.

  4. #4
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Thanks for your help. I enabled XMP through my BIOS, it's very visible in "EZ Mode". When I did this it asked me if I also wanted to enable "Core boost optimisation" - I chose yes and exited (the no option said "do not enable [intel stock]". When I reset back to defaults, should I do it this way or via the advanced mode?

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by trents View Post
    First, in addition to CPU-z which you already have installed, download and install HWMonitor and OCCT (a stress testing program). HWMonitor gives a lot detailed information about current, maximum and minimum voltages. Whenever you overclock you need monitor maximum package temp while stress testing for stability.

    Second, to your posted image of the CPU-z screen tab, please add images of the "Memory" and the "SPD" tab.

    Third, your core VID 1.359 looks like it might be higher than needed to get to 4.7 ghz. Tuner Wizards and Genies like EZ Tune usually assign more volts than necessary and often also unnecessarily down clock the memory. Disable EZ Tune.

    Fourth, go into bios and reset all values to "optimized defaults." Usually this can be done with one of the "F" keys, F7 maybe.

    Then go into the Overclock Tweaker's tab and set the overclock mode to manual and for "all cores." Increase the default core ratio multiplier by a 1X increment. Set the memory frequency to "XMP."

    Open HWMonitor on the desktop.

    After each 1x increment increase, stress test for 20 minutes with OCCT (Large Data set). Observe package temps. You want them to stay under 90c maximum during stress testing. Repeat this process until your core ratio is too high on stock voltage to pass the 20 minute OCCT stress test.

    Add .01 to the CPU core voltage (what we call "vcore") and repeat the stress test. Add more core voltage if you need to in order to pass the stress test. As you climb higher in the overclock, each increment of CPU speed increase will require more voltage to get stable or package temps get too high (90c max). You will reach a point where either voltage or temps become too high for safety.

    Conventional wisdom is that for 24/7 running, a 1.4 vcore is the max safe amount.

    When you hit either the max temp or voltage wall, increase the OCCT stress test time to 3 hr. If you can't pass the three hour test, back down on the core ratio one notch and retest. That should give you your max overclock.
    Thanks for the post. I will upload images of the SPD and Memory tabs when I get back home. I'm just wondering - does this process damage the hardware in any way ie. failing stress tests?

  5. #5
    Benching Team Leader
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    Johan45's Avatar
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    Dec 2012
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    You won't hurt anything except Windows. Use F5 for defaults in BIOS but you'll need to reset your XMP if you do it now.

  6. #6
    After you set XMP to the memory test the system for stability before overclocking.
    i5 6600K OC 4.5GHz
    Cooler Master Hyper 212
    Motherboard Gigabyte Z170-HD3
    G.SKILL Ripjaws v 16GB F4-3200C14D-16GVK XMP Speed 3200 CL 14-14-14-34
    EVGA Black Edition Superclocked GTX 1070

  7. #7
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Quote Originally Posted by Johan45 View Post
    We don't really recommend the Auto tuners. Typically they set the voltage too high and some will drop your ram speed. I would clear it out so it won't apply an OC at startup. Go to BIOS and set defaults, then reboot. Then I would set the XMP and reboot again to BIOS. At this point try setting 1.3V manually and the x47 multiplier. Boot to windows. If it doesn't boot you'll need more voltage if it does then try a stability test.
    So I went into advanced mode and manually enabled XMP and overclocked with a multiplier of 48, core voltage 1.30 and adaptive power management after getting help from someone. Here's what my CPU-Z looks like now. I ran AIDA64 for 2 hours and my average temps were 63 C with average Vcore of 1.295.

    Does this look right?




  8. #8
    Looks great, good job.
    i5 6600K OC 4.5GHz
    Cooler Master Hyper 212
    Motherboard Gigabyte Z170-HD3
    G.SKILL Ripjaws v 16GB F4-3200C14D-16GVK XMP Speed 3200 CL 14-14-14-34
    EVGA Black Edition Superclocked GTX 1070

  9. #9
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    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Quote Originally Posted by wingman99 View Post
    Looks great, good job.
    Thanks. Now to consider overclocking my GPU - I've got a 1080 but it's apparently performing in the 18th percentile according to userbenchmark. It's an EVGA GTX 1080 SC - no idea why! All my components are top notch so this is very unexpected.

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