Notices

Overclockers Forums > Software > Internet, Networking, and Security
Internet, Networking, and Security Networking and Viruses/Malware trouble. Get the answers here.
Forum Jump

Networking Guides

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe Search this Thread
 
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-13-01, 03:37 PM Thread Starter   #1
rugby
King of Cats Senior

 
rugby's Avatar 

Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Chicago, IL

 
Helpful tips for home networking


Moderator Note: This sticky is an amalgamation of several sticky worthy posts which fall under the category of "Basic Networking Guides". Below is a table of contents for this sticky, as well as links to the full original threads the posts appeared in. Please direct any comments and questions to the original thread -- any new posts appearing in this thread will be deleted.


I'm writing this as a sort of mini-guide to help people out here in the Internet/Networking forum.

I have seen lots of posts regarding sharing Internet connections in their home. I have written this up to help people so they don't have to keep asking the same questions as people have before them. Don't fret, we've all been newbies before so it's no biggie.

Now, you've got your connection, whether it's cable or DSL or whatever. There are some differences you should note.

Cable is a shared medium, meaning you share your connection with your neighbors. You are basically one port of a switch so ANY traffic, even to another computer in your home that has another IP address, goes to your cable ISP and back before going to your other computer.

DSL is not a shared medium. You DSL modem is a router that works entirely different than a cable modem. If you have multiple IP address from your DSL provider the modem will route between your computers more efficiently and you will have pretty good speed.

Commercial routers- Linksys, D-link, SMC these are a few of the companies out there making commercial routers/switches. I personally have a D-link but I bought it at a time when prices were MUCH higher than they are now and this one was cheaper than the rest. I would recommend any one of the products by these companies.

The router's job is to route traffic. Duh, right? Anyways, when you put your router between your computer(s) and the modem it can do many useful things. Here are some of them

NAT(Network Address Translation)-basically taking the IP address your cable/dsl modem gives out and translating it to private addresses so you can hook up multiple computers and share an address. This is very useful for home networks and we even use this technology at my school district here. Now, the IP address your computer is using now is what's known as a private address. We'll get to that later.

DHCP server-You can have your router give out IP addresses to computers that are hooked up to it and then booted up. Very handy for quick setup although I am a fan of static addressing in the long run, and you'll see why in a second.

DMZ zone-This enables your router to forward any and all traffic to a single IP address. This requires static addressing so you're not forwarding to an invalid IP address.

Port mapping-This is like a DMZ zone but more controlled. You can enable only certain ports (ftp, http, telnet, SSH) to certain IP addresses inside your network. Again, static addressing is needed so as to not forward traffic to computers that are not there.

Setup on these routers is fairly straight forward. You take the cable provided by the router (usually in the box) and plug the router into the LAN port on your cable/dsl modem. You then plug straight-through ethernet (regular old cat-5) cable from the computers to the switch ports on the router. Reboot or startup the cable/dsl modem, start up the router, start up the computers and you should be good to go.

This is the easiest way to share a home network connection IMO. Sure you can set up a windows PC with ICS installed and configured to be a mini-router. You can also set up your own router using Linux, but you have to keep these computers on 24/7 and if you need for any reason to shut them down or restart then the rest of your computers will lose their connections to the Internet.

I hope I’ve made home networking a bit easier and haven’t overwhelmed anyone here. If you have any further questions feel free to post here or PM me. Thanks.

Last edited by JigPu; 04-10-05 at 08:13 PM.
rugby is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 09-22-02, 12:15 AM   #2
su root
Senior Member
--
I teach people how to read your email.

 
su root's Avatar 

Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Ontario, Canada

10 Year Badge
 
Post Networking Guides


This guide is for people new to networking to help them set up their first network.

Table of Contents:
  • 000 - How to use this guide

    Non-Internet Sharing Solutions:
  • 001 - Very Cheap and Simple 2-Computer-Only Network, Non-Upgradeable
  • 010 - Normal, Upgradeable Network

    Internet Sharing Solutions:
  • 011 - Sharing Internet by direct connection
  • 100 - Sharing Internet using a proxy
  • 101 - Sharing Internet using a Router

    Appendixes:
  • APPENDIX A - NICs
  • APPENDIX B - Difference between hub and switch
  • APPENDIX C - File / Printer Sharing
  • APPENDIX D - Troubleshooting


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
000 - How to use this guide:
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you are setting up a network without internet, follow the 001 or 010 sections, the ones without internet sharing solutions. Consider whether you need to have the network expandable in the future, and their cost, and needed equipment. You may also consider section 101, if you plan on getting Cable/DSL internet in the future.

If you have internet that you want to share, consider the other 3 sections, 011, 100, and 101. Consider them all, including the types of internet connections they support, their cost, and materials needed, then follow one of them. (Some sections will request that you set up your network using section 010 with no internet shared, and then add internet sharing on top of that network.)





---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
001 - Very Cheap and Simple 2-Computer-Only Network, Non-Upgradeable, No Internet
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is a very simple and cheap network to set up. Unfortunately, you are limited to 2 computers, and can only upgrade to a "proxy" internet solution with this setup.

Diagram:


Needed:
  • 2 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet Cards (NICs), one for each computer -- see Appendix A
  • 1 x CAT5e Cross-wired ethernet cable. You need it to reach to both computers.

Turn off both computers, install each NIC into the computers, one per computer. Connect the CAT5 cable to both computers directly.

Fire up both computers, and the lights labeled "Link" on the network card should glow.

(optional)To ensure communication, you can set IP addresses on both computers.
On both computers, right click Network Neighborhood/Properties. Right Click the "Local Area Connection"/Properties. Select "Internet Protocol TCP/IP" and Click Properties. Select "Use the following IP Address", then set the following Information:
Computer1 IP: 192.168.0.1
Computer2 IP: 192.168.0.2
Both Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0





----------------------------------------------------
010 - Normal Network, Upgradeable, No Internet
----------------------------------------------------

This is your normal ethernet network. Very scalable, and can be upgraded to any of the 3 internet solutions in this guide.

Diagram:


Needed:
  • 2 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet Cards (NICs), 1 per computer -- See Appendix A
  • 2 x CAT5e Stright-wired ethernet cable, as long as you need to get from each computer to the hub/switch.
  • 1 x Hub or Switch (see Appendix B)

Turn off each computer, install each NIC into the computers, one per computer.
Connect the cable from each computer to the hub/switch. Plug in the hub/switch.

Start the computers, the lights labeled "Link" on the NIC and on the hub/switch should glow.

(optional)To ensure communication, you can set IP addresses on both computers.
On both computers, right click Network Neighborhood/Properties. Right Click the "Local Area Connection"/Properties. Select "Internet Protocol TCP/IP" and Click Properties. Select "Use the following IP Address", then set the following Information:
Computer1 IP: 192.168.0.1
Computer2 IP: 192.168.0.2
Computer3 IP: 192.168.0.3, etc.
Both Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

To add a computer, purchase an additional:
  • 1 x CAT5e Straight-wired ethernet cable, as long as you need to get from the new computer to the hub/switch.
  • 1 x 10/100 Fast Ethernet Cards (NICs) -- See Appendix A
Then connect the new computer to the hub/switch, check the link lights.





-------------------------------------------------
011 - Sharing Internet by direct connection
-------------------------------------------------

Direct connection internet sharing is completely reliant upon your ISP. For this to work, your ISP MUST give you more than one IP address (or you must purchase more than one IP address).

Diagram:


Needed:
  • A "Normal Network" (see Section 010 - Normal Network)
    ..AND..
  • 1 x IP address per computer
  • 1 x CAT5e Stright-wired cable, long enough to get from the Cable/DSL modem to the hub/switch

Works for:
  • Cable (except USB cable modems)
  • DSL (except USB DSL modems)
  • Other

***Contact your ISP and find out how many IP addresses you are allowed to use. If you are given more than one (or you choose to "rent" more IP addresses from your ISP, this is usually a reoccuring monthly charge), then you can use this solution.***

If you are using DSL, make sure your ISP allows you to simultaneously log in ("PPPoE dial up") on more than one computer (which would give you a seperate IP for each computer you log on to).

Connect the modem to the hub/switch, using the straight cable.

If all goes well, you can restart all your computers, and they should all be working on the internet. For DSL you will have to configure each computer with the PPPoe software.





------------------------------------------
100 - Sharing Internet using a proxy
------------------------------------------

For this solution, the computer you choose as "ComputerA" (the computer that will run the proxy software) will need to stay on 24/7 (or will have to be turned on in order for any computers to get internet access).

Diagram: (left is with "Normal Network", right is for "Crossover Network")


Needed:
  • A Crossover Network (see section 001 - 2-Computer-Only Network)
    ..OR..
  • A "Normal Network" (see Section 010 - Normal Network)

    ..AND..
  • 1 x Your Internet Connection Device:
    ........10/100 Fast Ethernet Card (NIC) -- (see Appendix A)
    ........Dialup Modem
    ........USB Cable/DSL Modem
    ........etc

Works for:
  • Dial-up
  • Cable (including USB Cable Modems)
  • DSL (including USB DSL Modems)
  • Other

Select one computer to be ComputerA (on the diagram, it is the computer on the right), Connect the internet to ComputerA, such that you can surf the internet on ComputerA.

For dial-up, install the modem in ComputerA, and make sure you can connect to the internet, and use it on that computer.

For Cable/DSL, you may need a second network card, depending on your modem. If your modem supplies a USB connection, you may choose to connect it to ComputerA using that (but I do not recommend USB Internet Connections, they are known to be unstable). If it has an ethernet port, I recommend you connect through that. You would need a second network card in ComputerA for that configuration.

You will then need to download and install a "proxy" program on ComputerA. This program will allow other computers on the network to access the internet. Here is a quick list of proxy programs:
  • AnalogX's Proxy -- LINK -- $0, some setup involved, not alot of features.
  • ICS - Internet Connection Sharing -- LINK -- $0, already built into newer OS's, 98 also has ICS.
  • SyGate -- LINK -- Complex, very configurable, and somewhat expensive.
  • WinGate -- LINK -- Complex, very configurable, and somewhat expensive.
  • And many more.. including IPTABLES or IPCHAINS for unix/linux platforms. (for info on them, install them, then run man iptables or man ipchains)
Security Note: ICS, Sygate, and WinGate, were at one time or another prone to hacks. ICS is the most widely used, but that makes it the most likely to be hacked. For your protection, use download and install a software firewall on atleast the proxy server.

If ComputerA isn't going to be used, you may consider using the computer as a linux proxy/gatway server instead. It offers increased security, better uptimes, and more reliablilty -- no knowledge of linux needed!
  • Coyote Linux - Linux Router-on-a-floppy disk. No harddrive/cdrom needed.
  • SmoothWall - Linux Router with lots of extra features



----------------------------------------------
101 - Sharing Internet using a Router
----------------------------------------------

One of the easiest networks, very little setup required, but has the most expense.

Diagram:


Needed:
  • A "Normal Network" (see Section 010 - Normal Network) -- using a Cable/DSL Router instead of a hub/switch.
    ..AND..
  • 1 x Cable/DSL router
  • 1 x CAT5e Straight-wired ethernet cable, as long as you need to get from the modem to the router.

Works for:
  • Dial-up*
  • Cable*
  • DSL*
  • Other*
*=Depends on the WAN connection type the router supports. DialUp connections need DialUp-ready Routers. Most common are Cable/DSL routers.

Turn off each computer, install each NIC into the computers, one per computer.
Connect the cable from each computer to the router. Plug in the router.

Start the computers, the lights labeled "Link" on the NIC and on the router should glow.

Configure the router (refer to router's manual). Generally, you have to go to the router's web-based configuration menu, http://192.168.0.1 but that varies, depending on the router.







----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------APPENDIXES----------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


----------------------------------------------
APPENDIX A: Onboard NICs / Included NICs
----------------------------------------------

Some computers may have NICs already. You may have a NIC on your motherboard, or there might have been one that came with your computer, or you might have installed one that came with your cable/dsl internet package. So, you may not need to purchase as many NICs as stated if you already have some.

*Personal Note: Try to avoid USB NICs, ISA NICs or 10Mb/s-only NICs, they are slow and sometimes unreliable.





-----------------------------------------------------------
APPENDIX B: The difference between hubs and switches?
-----------------------------------------------------------
  • A hub is like a guy with a megaphone. Everyone on the network talks only to the guy with the megaphone, and the guy with the megaphone(the hub), repeats it all so that everyone hears it.
  • A switch is like the switchboard for a telephone company. Everyone on the network calls the person they want, and talks to them directly, the switchboard(the switch) connects the call.
The difference is that in a hub network, only one computer can talk at a time, whereas in a switch network, any computer can talk to any other computer at any time.

Hubs, by definition can only go as slow as their slowest device, so if you have a 10Mbit device (like a cable modem, or a 10Mbit NIC), your entire network can only go 10Mbits (because all devices have to hear everything on the network).

Another advanatage of a switch network is something called "Full Duplex". It means that you can talk to one computer, and you can recieve from another computer (or that same computer), at the same time. (This is a big difference, compared to a hub, where only one computer can transmit at a time)

With Full Duplex, it gives you 2 channels, a 100Mbit SEND channel, and a 100Mbit RECIEVE channel "for each port". Therefore, you are theoretically doubling your bandwidth when using Full Duplex. The idea behind it is that you have 200Mbits bandwidth per port (compared to 100Mbits for the entire hub to share), that is always available to the port.

If you have the money (and nowadays it's not that much more), buy the switch, it is the better choice. If you look hard enough, you can find 5 port switches for $50 CDN, or 8 port switches for $70 CDN. (at time of writing). Update: Nowadays, hubs are more expensive than switches, it's becomming harder to find hubs.

How many ports do I get?
Don't get anything less than 5 ports, unless you are sure you aren't going to upgrade.
Other than that, use your discression. If you are using 3 or more ports, and plan to get a new system soon, buy an 8 port instead.

Note: you can always add more hubs/switches to your network if you need it (use stright cable from one switch's uplink port to the other switch's normal port, OR use cross cable from normal port to normal port).

Personal Experience: My first hub was 5-ports, I now have an extra 8-port switch, and I have grown to 7 devices. Don't underestimate network growth! -- Buying a few extra ports now is alot cheaper than buying a new switch later.





----------------------------------------
APPENDIX C: File / Printer Sharing
----------------------------------------

In order for file and printer sharing to work, all computers must:
  • be in the same workgroup
  • have different names
  • have File & Printer Sharing installed
  • have shares created
  • have all IPs be in the same subnet, for example: 192.168.0.x / subnet 255.255.255.0
  • XP's firewall disabled
  • Other firewalls disabled (or set to trust the network)





------------------------------
APPENDIX D: Troubleshooting
------------------------------

Something go wrong?
  • Check your cables, make sure they are all plugged in, and hubs/switches/routers are all turned on. Check the link lights on all devices, the "link" light should be glowing, indicating a connection.
  • Check your IP addresses
  • Search the forums
  • Search Google
  • Post a question in the Internet, Networking & Security forum.


Revision History:
-----------------------
Version 1.0 = September 22, 2002
Version 2.0 = June 4, 2003 (Re-write, added colors)
Version 2.1 = July 4, 2003 (USB info, How to use this guide section, and some clarifications)
Version 2.2 = March 2, 2004 (Diagrams)
Version 2.3 = May 16, 2004 (Minor revisions)

__________________
"Some people, when confronted with a problem, think 'I know, Ill use regular expressions.' Now they have two problems."

Last edited by JigPu; 04-10-05 at 07:38 PM.
su root is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 09-10-03, 11:56 PM   #3
pik4chu
Senior Yellow Forum Rat

 
pik4chu's Avatar 

Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Highlands Ranch, Colorado

10 Year Badge
 
GUIDE: Windows networking for "dummies"


I've been seeing a lot of small network setup questions recently, especially ones with Internet Connection Sharing questions such as sharing dial-up and similar. now su root has an excellent guide on the general basics but I feel the need for one focused specifically on Microsoft operating systems and the how-to's for each. So, here it is hope ya'll enjoy.

(and wow, I started with the intenetion of a small couple section guide and it turned into a bit of a monster, lol)


Sections
0. Assumptions before using this guide
1. Networking Windows XP computers
2. Networking Windows 2000/9x/ME computers
3. Sharing internet connections through a single computer
4. Sharing Internet connections through a router/cable modem or similar device
5. Static Vs Dynamic IP addresses
6. Expanding this guide for different configurations
7. Cautions, Concerns and basic Troubleshooting



Section 0 - Assumptions and Preface

This guide is meant as additional reading to su root's guide stated above. I wrote this guide assuming you have the physical connection between computers setup and you are looking for configuration. I also wrote this in a bit of "X for dummies" so if it seems a bit inferior please dont be offended, this is intended to help anyone and everyone network without making assumptions of Operating system Knowledge. So Enjoy and good luck


Section 1 - Networking Windows XP computers

In order to be able to connect to another Windows XP machine and browse folders and files. the following protocols must be installed on both machines. 1) File and Print Sharing for Microsoft Networks 2) Client for Microsoft Networks 3) Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). to verify this in XP click Start then right-click 'My Network Places' and select Properties from the drop down menu. it should bring up a window with the title 'Network Connections' with an icon labeled 'Local Area Connection X', X is for a number, most likely will be '1' or none at all if your starting fresh. Right-click on this icon and select properties form the drop down menu. this will bring up the network properties for your network card, there will be a box in the middle of the window with the label "This connection uses the following items:" verify that the three things listed above are in that box. If they are all there then click on the advanced tab and be sure the checkbox for "Protect my computer and network by limiting..blah..blah" is NOT checked then click the OK button. Repeat these steps for all XP Machines (for both XP Home and XP Pro). For other options you might want to take a look at see Section 5. Next you want to verify that all computers are on the same workgroup, otherwise you may have issues when trying to find other computers on your network. To do this in Windows XP, right-click the 'My Computer' icon and select properties from the drop down. In the System Properties Dialogue Box click the 'Computer Name' tab and view what is listed next to "Workgroup:" the default is generally MSHOME or similar. If you don't like the name, click the change button and at the bottom, be sure the radio-button is set to 'Workgroup' and type in a name then hit ok. it will tell you that you need to reboot for changes to take affect, go ahead and do so. Remember that whatever workgroup name you use be sure to keep it consistent with all your computers. With all that said and done you should have a working network with your XP
computers.


Section 2 - Networking other Microsoft OS's

For Adding Windows 2000/9x computers to your network (this includes, 2000, 98, 95, ME) it will be as follows; In windows 2000 you do everything the same way as you would with XP the only difference is that there is no firewall to disable, so dont worry about the advanced tab in the Local Area connections dialogue box.
For windows 98 it also does not have the firewall feature, it also doesnt even have an advanced tab, so dont worry if it isn't there. The second difference is that your computer name and workgroup name are found by right-clicking network neighborhood and going to properties then clicking the 'identification' tab. all the rest of the options and configuration is the same.


Section 3 - Internet Connection Sharing through a PC

Step 1. Now for the good part, Internet! What you will need for the computer that connects to the internet (the one whose connection you wish to share). This computer will need another Network card in addition to whatever is used to connect to the internet. First configure this computer and your others as stated in the above two sections depnding on the Operating System. Before we get to into this I would like to add that only Win98 and above allow this feature, if need to share the connection on a windows 95 machine you need to either upgrade or change the connection device to a supported Operating System (preferred method). Now onto the configuration. Regardless of which Operating System you choose you need to make sure the accessory is actually installed on the system to begin with, otherwise you couldn't enable it. The best way to do this is go back into the properties window for the network connections right click network neighborhood>properties>etc once there, in Windows 2000/98 right click the network connection your wanting to share and goto properties; if there is a sharing tab then this will work so goto the configuration step two paragraphs down. For Windows XP it should also be installed by default. To verify this, go to the Network Connections window and right click the connection you're wanting to share and select properties, then the advanced tab, if below the firewall section there is a section then your good to go, see the configuration procedure 2 paragraphs down.

Step 2. Now If there is no option for sharing the internet connection then you need to install it, you will need your original OS install disc for this, goto Start>control panel> add/remove programs. Within the add/remove programs select 'add/remove windows components' Mostly likely you will only need to do this is Windows 98, and its relatively the same for every other OS. But what you want to install is under "Internet Services" or "network services" and the option "Internet Connection Sharing" or ICS for short. Add the component and when its done go on to the next step.

Step 3. Procedure for 1) In windows XP 2) In Other Windows OS's.
1) In windows XP just do like we did when checking if it was installed. Put a check in the box for "allow other users to user this connection to connect to the internet, etc." then click the Ok button. It will bring up a dialogue box stating that it will set the IP address for the OTHER connection to static and enable DHCP so oher users can connect through your computer and get to the internet. click ok and let it do its thing. now wasn't that easy? Note: if you get a prompt asking about running specific services just click ok, you dont need to do any of that stuff for basic internet sharing. <See step 4>

2) For other operating systems its just as easy only in a slightly different place. Goto the connection properties for the connection you wish to share and click the sharing tab. then the checkbox for "enable internet connection sharing for this connection" click ok to the dialogue boxes that popup and thats it!. <see step 4>

Step 4. The last thing you have to do to make this work is set all other computers in your network to "obtain IP automcatically" aka "DHCP" or dynamic addresses. for more information on how to do this please see section 5. for possible issues with setting this up refer to section 7 - Cautions and Concerns.


Section 4 - Internet Sharing using router/cable modem/etc

Due to the great variety of hardware you can use for doing this, varying from simple Linksys or similar solutions to hardware firewalls in Linux and Cisco routers, also the fact that most ISPs give you a modem or other to use with thier service. And therefore the hardcore configurations of those are beyond the scope of this guide. The best place for those things are the Manufacturer's sites and related message boards/tech support. Or asking specific questions on these forums. With that out of the way On to the setup.

The most user friendly way of doing this is connecting the router or cable modem to a switch and the computers to the switch, then configuring the computers to use DHCP and problem solved. Since most cable/DSL modems these days act as little DHCP servers this will generally work. now if the modem happens to be internal, simply use the method on Internet Sharing through a computer in the previous section. Minor Troubleshooting for this setup is discussed in Section 7.

Thats about it for this section.. if anyone would like Manufacturer sites and coonfig info lemme know ill add it to this section or at the end.


Section 5 - Satic Vs Dynamic IP Addressing

First the basic idea behind these two configurations then followed with how to set it up. The main difference between these two methods is that with Static addressing you put in by hand the IP address for every computer on your network, hence the name 'static'. This is good if you have maybe a server on a network where various applications or services access this computer based on its IP and not the computer, so if it werer to constantly change, would cause a headache for re-configuring the application or service. Also allows you to browse your network based on IP if; you cant get NetBIOS to work, or you prefer that method rather than browsing in Network neighborhood. A couple of the major disadvantages of this is, error. Putting all these numbers in by hand your bound to make a mistake, also you have to make note of all the addresses you use so you dont repeat any address causing the newtork to not work on some computers. The second disadvantage is time, it takes a while to do this, so its recommended only for small networks. Or if you use it in large networks, use it only for things like routers, network printers and servers, whose address needs to stay constant on the network.

The main feature of DHCP or Dynamic addressing is that it requires less administration. You simply setup a dhcp server, whether its a computer with ICS running, a full blown DHCP server, a router, or a cable/dsl modem listed above. Then configure all the host computers to "Obtain an IP address "automatically" and your done (reboot of computers may be needed, or a DOS command can be run, info below). DHCP is a top choice for large networks combined with minor amounts of static addresses. Advanced configuration for DHCP services is beyond the scope of this guide in its current form. The disadvantage is that you need some form of a DHCP server, which may be extra hardware depending on your configuration. Now for configuration.

To configure your computer to use DHCP or static IP addressing, goto the connection properties for the appropriate connection (there is usually only one). In the box of protocols (file and print sharing, TCP/IP, etc.) double-click on 'Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)' or click once and click the properties button. In there are two options; "Obtain an IP address automatically" and "Use the following address". I think these two are pretty self explanatory, automatic would be dynamic addressing. and if you wanted static, you choose to use the one you type in. The two required numbers for static addresses are the IP address itself and the subnet mask. For the IP address I would recommend one set of the following 192.168.1.x or 192.168.0.x, for each computer you would increment x by 1, starting at 2 (there is a reason for this as described later). These addresses are the most common for home networks as they are private and cant be used on the internet, which is an added security bonus. For the subnet mask with the above addresses you use 255.255.255.0 the default gateway is not needed unless you have an internet connection. In which case that address would be the address of whatever device is connected directly to the internet. The DNS servers are also not needed in a basic network w/o internet. Note: In Windows 9x if you change the IP address settings, such as the number itelf or switch from static to dynamic etc. a reboot is required, in 2K/XP you do not need to reboot.

One thing to keep in mind is that most of the methods described above, such ICS, DSL/cable modems and routers, all generally use DHCP. DHCP will also populate these fields including IP address, Gateway, subnet mask, and DNS servers, so you shouldnt need to worry about those if your using dynamic addressing.


Section 6 - Expanding this guide

For information on more advanced topics and configurations, just pm me or reply to the thread and I'll see about writting something up for it. If your setting up a basic to moderate network, combining this guide with su root's and taking from the various topics within them you should be able to setup most things without any problems.


Section 7 - Cautions, Concerns and Basic Troubleshooting

Cautions

In Windows XP it seems that there are sometimes issue with ICS not being avaliable for connections in certain installs but possible in others, even if the service is installed. I unfortunately do not really know a solid solution for this other than just keep fidling with it until it works (if anyone does, let me know Ill add it in)

Also understand that in the world of computers things don't always work. so don't expect 100% perfect on the first try and ask for help. But generally it will work fine with no glitches. So don't get discouraged

Concerns

Be careful when sharing internet connections through computers and other devices, make sure whatever is connected directly to the internet has some sort of protection in place, firewall wise. Its sad but true, you can get hacked just because you're there. Its not as crucial with temporary connections like dial-up, but when you go to broadband, make sure whatever you use has one built in (most router/switches have medium strength built-in firewalls that work just fine). It can be one of those "gotcha's" and this kind of one can be very bad.

Troubleshooting

If you are having trouble connecting to other computers on your network, try the following:
1) Make sure all the computers are in the same workgroup
2) Make sure all IP addresses follow the same addressing scheme and are complete
3) If using XP make sure the firewall is disabled.
4)a) if using dynamic IP's make sure all computers have a valid address. verify this by going to Start>run> type "command" and hit enter (for 2K/XP its "cmd")
4)b) at the command prompt that comes up, type ipconfig and hit enter, verify that you have an address matching your scheme, if it starts with 169.254 you have a problem communicating with the server, or have no address.
4)c) if your computer has no address type the following into the command prompt ipconfig /release and hit enter, then ipconfig /renew and hit enter. The renew can take a while depending on network conditions.

If you are having trouble accessing the internet through an intermediary device try the following:
1) Try setting the gateway (gateway only) to the address of the intermediary device. Note that in 98 you cant set just the gateway, but if you set a gateway, then change it back to DHCP sometimes it works. Also, add the IP address of the intermediary as the Primary DNS server, sometimes helps the connection/DHCP issue.


Well I think thats the end of this guide.. actually the first official Guide I've written, yall let me know what you think and if I should add anything (pointing out typos and such would be appreciated). MY brain has decided to stop think for the day so if I've left anything out you feel should be here (links, extra info, tips, etc) toss it out and I'll consider putting it on. Who knows, maybe I'll get my first real stickie! hehe. Anyways I hope this helps all you peeps out there with computers your wanting to network and don't know where to start.
-Greg Jenkins

__________________
DFI X58-T3EH8 | I7-920 C0@3.0 (V8) | 6*2GB Corsair Dominator @1800-7-7-7-18 | eVGA 285 | 1.5 TB RAID 0 | Win7 64-bit (456Watts)
Main Server (WIP): DFI X58-T3EH8 | I7-920 C0@3.6 | 3*2GB Corsair Dominator @1800-7-7-7-18 | 8*1.5TB in RAID 5 (283Watts)

Folding User Stats
Team 32 Countdown heatware

Last edited by JigPu; 04-10-05 at 07:29 PM.
pik4chu is offline Benching Profile Folding Profile Heatware Profile   QUOTE Thanks
Old 12-20-04, 04:19 AM   #4
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
Post Guide for Creating A CAT5, CAT5/E Cable


First this are the most things you will need.

crimpor: $20

RJ-45's: $10, 25 RJ's in a box.

Testers: i have seen from $20 - $60.

Wires: $50 for 1000 foot cat5/e cable, most was used at my uncles plaza.

Router, Switch, Hubs, and adapters: these u should already have but, SMC wireless router $60 at micro center , switch $30 compusa, and a wireless adapter $30 - $80, Hubs i have seen for around $10 - $60 for a home network and NIC's ( Network Interface Cards, also know as Ethernet or LAN ports) $9.99 - $30.

these are just what you need to began. i have my network for 2 years now. i have cox cable and 5 comps on my network 3 hard wired ( 1 to router and 2 to switch ) and 2 wireless ( one 20ft away and other 10ft ) this should be all u need.

now here are what you will need to do to creat a cat5, cat5/e cable. following steps exactly and all should work..
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steps For a Straight through
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Get the cat5 cable and cut about one inches off the jacket.
2. Now untwist the cables and arrange them to the sequence of the picture at the bottom. make sure not to untwist too much. more twisted the better.

568-B Straight through cable layout



3. as having followed that cut off 1/2 inches from the previous 1 inch untwisted cable that you had ready and in the right sequence.
4. fit the cables inside a RJ-45 while keeping the same sequence.
5. last basic step is to crimp.
6. reapeat for the other side and be sure to keep the right sequence as the picture.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Straight through cable are used for routers -> NICS, switch -> NICS and Hubs -> to NICS. you will probbebly be using this at home, bceause if you were using this in a business i dont thinkl you will be looking at a Beginner's Guide.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Steps For a Cross Over Cable
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Get the cat5 cable and cut about one inches off the jacket.
2. Now untwist the cables and arrange them to the sequence of the picture at the bottom. make sure not to untwist too much. more twisted the better.

568-A cross over cable layout



3. as having followed that cut off 1/2 inches from the previous 1 inch untwisted cable that you had ready and in the right sequence.
4. fit the cables inside a RJ-45 while keeping the same sequence.
5. last basic step is to crimp.
6. repeat steps for the other side BUT U WILL HAVE TO SWITCH THE ORDERS TO THE ONE IN THE PICTURE.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
switch over cables are mostly used in servers, and as stated by X1ggy also on hubs,switches,Routers, and NIC to NICS. so if your doing this for home you will probably not need this.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Here Is a List Of Things To Watch Out For
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Keep cables away from devices which can introduce noise into them such as: welding machines, microwave ovens, motors, electric ovens, dryers, washing machines, and ETC.
2. Try to avoid running cables parallel to power cables. Althogh i ahve mine running that way, it runs fine.
3. Do not bend cables to less than four times the diameter of the cable.
4. Be sure to use this the UTP ( unshilded twisted pair ) in doors.


originally by SU ROOT:


Here's some more information, since I have the time:

Categories:
CAT3 = Mainly for telephone cables, also does 4Mbit Token Ring/Bus and 10Mbit ethernet.
CAT4 = Rarely seen, can do 16Mbit Token Ring/Bus
CAT5 = 100Mbit ethernet
CAT5e = 100Mbit ethernet, with support for 1000Mbit
CAT6 = Built for 1000Mbit
CAT6e = 1000Mbit, with support for 10000Mbit
CAT7= 10000Mbit
They are all similar in that they are twisted pair, but the category indicates the amount of twists, along with the frequencies it'll work with, the impedence, and other electronic characteristics. These are just wires... you can use them for anything... a lot of people nowadays use CAT5 for telephone, just because that's what they have around.

RJ-45 = a standard 8-wire end plug, used for ethernet
RJ-11 = a standard 4-wire end plug, used for phones

Plenum = This is fire-rated cable. It won't release toxic fumes when burned. Some places require this type of cable be used when placed within walls, ceilings, or floors.. you'll have to check your local building code. This is more expensive.

Soft Cables = These have a soft outer shell, and are generally used as patch cables, because they're easy to bend
Hard Cables = These have a hardened outer shell and are generally used for long runs, as it's easier to feed through places.

Solid Core = This type of cable has a single, solid core of a wire.
Stranded = This type of cable has strands of wire for each wire.

UTP = Unshielded Twisted Pair.. this is the most common
STP = Shielded Twisted Pair.. this has a tinfoil shield that protects it from EMI, and is more commonly used with laptops (for the ground) or around places that have a lot of interference.

100Base-TX = "100", "Base", "TX"
100 = The speed, 100Mbit.
Base = Baseband.. a local network... Broadband is a wide area network.
TX = Type of cable: Can be 2,5,T,T2,T4,TX,FX,Fx,SX,LX:
-- 2 = Thinnet - Coax using BNC-T's. - 185m
-- 5 = Thicknet - Thick Coax using Vampire Taps & AUI - 500m
-- T = Half Duplex - 100m
-- T2 = 2 Pair signaling
-- T4 = 4 Pair signaling
-- FL = Fiber Optic cable - 2000m
-- TX = Half/Full Duplex - 100m
-- FX = Multimod Fiber, Full Duplex/Half Duplex
-- Fx = Single mode Fiber, Full Duplex
-- SX = 850nm Short Wavelength Fiber, Full Duplex
-- LX = 1300nm Long Wavelength Fiber, Full Duplex

Here are some valid conbinations:
10Base2 = 50-ohm thin coaxial = 185 meters
10Base5 = 50-ohm thick coaxial = 500 meters
10BaseT = CAT3, 4, or 5 UTP = 100 meters
10BaseFL = Fiber optic = 2000 meters
10BaseT4 = CAT3 UTP = 100 meters
100BaseTX = CAT5 UTP = 100 meters
100BaseFX = Multimode fiber optic = 2000 meters
100BaseFx = Single-mode fiber optic = 10,000 meters

for more info on su root's network related post go to http://www.ocforums.com/showthread.php?t=124165

Heres the Console cable. thnx to kromix.

1------------8
2------------7
3------------6
4------------5
5------------4
6------------3
7------------2
8------------1

thats basicly it. If any help is needed reply, YM, IM , or E-Mail me.

goodluck.
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 12-20-04, 11:56 PM   #5
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
Post Guide on opening Ports


Applications running on the same language or "TCP/IP", open connections to other computers by using something called ports. Ports allow multiple applications to run on a single computer. Ports are another set of numbers at the end of a regular IP address. Your router needs to have these ports opened in order for some programs to log on and work properly.

First download a program called TCPView which you get the .zip file from here . install and run the program.

Next every router has a special IP address which you can connect and change settings.

*Note: U MUST KNOW THE IP AND THE SPECIAL PASSWORD SET FOR THE ROUTER TO CONTINUE. IF YOU DON'T KNOW IT CALL YOUR ROUTER COMPANY AND THEY SHOULD TELL YOU.*

The IP address is usually 192.168.2.1 but it may various with the router. once connected you should see a section called "NAT". then some where around it u should see "Vertual Servers". Here is a screen shot of what mine looks like.

click to see more clearly
.

Now. open TCPView and locate a IP.



*firefox.exe:1156 TCP killa-zdf3byfz6:1501 killa-zdf3byfz6:0*

1501 is the port number and the kind is TCP. now all you have to do is enter the numbers and enable.

special thanks to SU ROOT for showing me TCPView

GOOD LUCK. IF ANY ONE NEEDS HELP IM,YM,REPLY, OR E-MAIL ME.

feel free to tell me to add anything that you think i missed.
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 01-15-05, 12:55 PM   #6
kayson
Member

 
kayson's Avatar 

Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: USA

 
Linksys Specifics


Thought I might add some help for users with linksys routers.

The default ip address for linksys routers is 192.168.1.1

The default password is admin
(There is no username)

That'll bring you here (your setup screen may differ depending on your model and version):



With newer routers, the section you're looking for is Applications and Gaming.
With some older versions, I believe the section was Port Range Forwarding.

Here's what mine looks like:



Application is just a name so you know what it's for (ie. hlds, ftp, http, etc)

Start is the beginning of the port range. Say you want to forward ports 20-25, put 20 in this box.

End is the end of the port range. You would put 25. If you just want one port, put that in both start and end.

Protocol is dependent on what protocol the program is using. If you're using TCPview, it'll give you what protocol; usually a list of ports will specify what protocol. If you're not sure, use both.

IP Address is the IP address of the computer you want to forward the information to. You'll probably want to make it static if you want to have a long-term server.

Check enable, then apply settings.

A note on ports if you want to set up hlds (half-life dedicated server)

Here's the list of portrs you'll need:
27010 - 27012 / UDP
5273 - 5273 / TCP
7002 - 7002 / TCP
27020 - 27020 / BOTH
27015 - 27015 / UDP

However, Nick Shaffner of Valve, in the HLDS mailing list said to forward
27005-27024 TCP and UDP, and that should cover the default ports for all titles, including HL2.

__________________
Project Silver
Intel Core i7-4770k
Asus Maximus VI Hero
G.Skill Sniper 2x4GB DDR3-1866
EVGA nVidia GeForce GTX 760
Corsair HX850
Samsung 840 Pro 256GB
Thermalright Venomous X || 2x 120mm Panaflo || Arctic Silver V
Lian-Li PC-A77FA || Vantec Nexus Fan Controller
(Build Journal)
Heatware
kayson is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 01-15-05, 01:52 PM   #7
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
D-Link Routers

To connect to the router in a web browser type 192.168.0.1 . u should get somthing asking for password and username. the defualt username is "admin" and the passswrod is " " that means its black dont put nothing.

here is a pitcher of the manuel of a D-Link Wireless router.

pitchure by ps2cho


If u know what you are doing dont run the wizard. To Input a port go to virtuale server then the advance tab. there u can set it up like. use the TCP/IP View to find the IP and the Passwaord.
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 01-18-05, 11:53 PM   #8
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
Step 1:
To setup port forwarding on this router your computer needs to have a static ip address. Take a look at our Static IP Address guide to setup a static ip address.

Step 2:
Open a web browser like internet explorer or Netscape.



Enter the ip address of your router in the address bar of your browser. In the picture above the address bar has http://192.168.1.1 in it. Just replace all of that with the ip address of your router. By default the ip address should be set to 192.168.1.254.

Step 3:
You should see a box prompting you for your username and password. Enter the username and password now. By default the username and password are both admin.

Step 4:
This page gives you three options. Click the Customized Configuration option.



Step 5:
In the menu at the top of your screen click the NAT button.



Step 6:
In the menu on the left hand side of your screen click the Virtual Server button.



Step 7:
Take a quick look in the Popular Servers drop down box. Do you see the application you want to setup port forwarding for? If you do, click it. You should see the Start Private Port, Start Public Port, and Type boxes change. Enter a name for this application into the Service Name box. It doesn't really matter what you put in this box, but something that will remind you of why these ports are forwarded is a good idea. Enter the ip address to forward this service to into the Private IP box. If you are forwarding ports so you can run a game on your computer, you should enter the ip address of your computer. Click the + Add button close to the bottom of the screen.

If you did not see the application you want to forward ports for in the Popular Servers box, don't worry. We will setup an application from scratch. Enter a name for this application into the Service Name box. It doesn't really matter what you put in this box, but something that will remind you of why these ports are forwarded is a good idea. Enter the ip address to forward this service to into the Private IP box. If you are forwarding ports so you can run a game on your computer, you should enter the ip address of your computer. This router only allows you to forward one port at a time. If you have to forward a lot of ports, you will need to add a different configuration for each of those ports. With that in mind, enter the port to forward into the Start Private Port and Start Public Port boxes. You can forward a range of ports by changing the value of the Number of Ports box. Let's say the Public and Private port boxes contain the port number 20. If you entered a 5 into the number of ports box, ports 20 through 24 would be forwarded. If you are unsure of the port range/ranges to use check the Ports list page or the software manufacture's homepage. Use the Type drop down box to select the protocol type for these ports. Usually this will be TCP or UDP. This router may have an option to select both. If you are unsure of which port protocol to use, you should select both protocols. Click the + Add button close to the bottom of the screen.

And that's it! You're done!
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 01-18-05, 11:57 PM   #9
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
Step 1:
To setup port forwarding on this router you computer needs to have a static ip address. Take a look at our Static IP Address guide to setup a static ip address.

Step 2:
Open a web browser. In the address bar type the ip address of your router. This ip address is 192.168.0.1 by default. Press enter.

Step 3:
You should now see the Setup Wizard, and it should be prompting you for a Username and a Password. By default this username is admin and the password is password.



Step 4:
The basic settings window show now be visible.

On the menu bar to the left under Advanced click Port Forwarding.



Step 5:
You should now be at the Port Forwarding menu as shown below.



You've got a couple options in this area. In the Service drop down box click the little triangle that is pointing down on the left hand side. This will open a drop down box of predefined services. Do you see the one that you want? If you do go ahead and enter the local ip address you wish to forward this service to in the Local IP Address box. Click Add to save the configuration you just made.

If you did not see the service you want to forward in the service drop down box, don't worry. Lets set up a new service manually. Enter the name of the service you wish to forward in the Name box. We are going to enter the port range into the Start Port/End Port range boxes. The start box should contain the lowest port number while the end box should contain the highest. If you are unsure of the port range/ranges check the Ports list page or the software manufacture's homepage. Lets go ahead and select the protocol type from the Protocol drop down box. If you are unsure of the protocol type select both. Enter the local ip address you wish to forward these ports to in the Local IP Address box. Click Add to save your changes.

Thats it You're done!
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 01-19-05, 12:00 AM   #10
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
Step 1:
To setup port forwarding on this router you computer needs to have a static ip address. Take a look at our Static IP Address guide to setup a static ip address.

Step 2:
Open a web browser like internet explorer or Netscape.


Enter the ip address of your router in the address bar of your browser. In the picture above the address bar has http://www.google.com in it. Just replace all of that with the ip address of your router. By default the ip address should be set to 192.168.123.254.

Step 3:
You should see a box prompting you for your system password. Enter the system password now. By default this password is admin. Go ahead and click the Log In button.



Step 4:
In the menu on the left hand side of your screen, click the Virtual Server link.



Step 5:
For port range/ranges information check the Ports list page or the software manufacture's homepage. Enter the port number you wish to forward in one of the Service Ports boxes. Then enter the IP address you wish to forward this port to in the Server IP box. Click the Enable box to enable your configuration. Go ahead and click the Save button at the bottom of this screen to save your settings.

And that's it! You're done!
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 01-29-05, 04:22 PM   #11
JigPu
Inactive Pokémon Moderator

 
JigPu's Avatar 

Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Vancouver, WA

10 Year Badge
 
Actiontec GT701-WG Port Forwarding Guide

1) Type 192.168.0.1 into your browser's address bar.

2) Log into the router with your username and password. Remember that both the username and password are case sensitive! The default values are:
Username: admin
Password: blank (ie: don't type anything!)
3) You should be presented with the following screen. Click on "Setup / Configuration".


4) The browser should change to the following page. Click the "Advanced Setup" link in the list to the left.


5) You should now be at the following screen. Click the "Begin Advanced Setup" button.


6) You should see a page similar to the one below. Click on the "Port Forwarding" link in the list to the left. It should be just below halfway down the list.


7) The port forwarding setup page shoud now appear as below.


To Forward A Single Port
  1. Type the single port you want to forward into both the "IP Port Range" fields.
  2. Change the protocol from TCP to UDP if required by the application (this should be made clear in the app's instructions. for most things this should stay on TCP.)
  3. Type in the IP address (hostname may work, though I have not tried) of the computer that the port should be forwarded to into the "IP Address" field.
  4. Click the "Add" button.
  5. Continue adding any additional port forwards required.
  6. When finished, reboot the router by clicking the "Save and Restart" link at the bottom left.

To Forward A Range Of Ports
  1. Type the lowest port to be forwarded into the first "IP Port Range" field. Type the highest port to be forwarded into the second field. All ports between these two ports (inclusive of the two specified) will be forwarded.
  2. Change the protocol from TCP to UDP if required by the application (this should be made clear in the app's instructions. for most things this should stay on TCP.)
  3. Type in the IP address (hostname may work, though I have not tried) of the computer that the port range should be forwarded to into the "IP Address" field.
  4. Click the "Add" button.
  5. Continue adding any additional port forwards required.
  6. When finished, reboot the router by clicking the "Save and Restart" link at the bottom left.

Advanced Port Forwarding
Warning! I have no experience with these advanced settings, and may be incorrect about their function. Experimentation will probably be required to get the settings correct.
  1. Click the "Advanced" button in the Port Forwarding screen to be presented with the screen below:
  2. Fill in the first fields that appeared in the "Simple" setup as per the instructions above.
  3. Fill in the "Remote IP Port Range" field in a fassion similar to the "IP Port Range" field above it. If an incoming request appears on a port within the "Remote IP Port Range", it should be remaped by the router and sent to the port specified by "IP Port Range".
  4. Change the "Remote IP Address to the IP that should be allowed access. A setting of anyIP should allow any IP address to access the port, while a specific IP should allow access only if the IP address of the remote machine matches.
  5. Click the "Add" button.
  6. Continue adding any additional port forwards required.
  7. When finished, reboot the router by clicking the "Save and Restart" link at the bottom left.


JigPu

__________________
.... ASRock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3
.... Intel Core i5 2500 ........................ 4 thread ...... 3300 MHz ......... -0.125 V
2x ASUS GTX 560 Ti ............................... 1 GiB ....... 830 MHz ...... 2004 MHz
.... G.SKILL Sniper Low Voltage ............. 8 GiB ..... 1600 MHz ............ 1.25 V
.... OCZ Vertex 3 ................................. 120 GB ............. nilfs2 ..... Arch Linux
.... Kingwin LZP-550 .............................. 550 W ........ 94% Eff. ....... 80+ Plat
.... Nocuta NH-D14 ................................ 20 dB ..... 0.35 C°/W ................ 7 V


"In order to combat power supply concerns, Nvidia has declared that G80 will be the first graphics card in the world to run entirely off of the souls of dead babies. This will make running the G80 much cheaper for the average end user."
"GeForce 8 Series." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 7 Aug 2006, 20:59 UTC. Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 8 Aug 2006.
JigPu is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 02-24-05, 02:22 PM   #12
LogRus
Member

 
LogRus's Avatar 

Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Seattle, WA

 
Nice guide here!

Also, I didn't see it posted here before, but the easiest way to figure out what's the IP of your router is to look @ your gateway address. Because sometimes unlesss you bought a brand new router or didn't reset it, its adress might be different .

To check your Gateway, just check your connection's Status (check pic) or go to Run => type cmd => and in the cmd window type ipconfig /all

Attached Images
 

__________________
-| Core i7 920 | ASRock Exterme 2 | 12GB G.Skill | 2x Intel SSD 120GB in RAID0 | 2x 1TB in RAID1 | ATi 4890 1GB |-
-| 15" MacBook Pro | Core i7 2.2Ghz | 8GB | 300GB Intel SSD | 6470 1GB ATi |-

Looking for a NEW card? Need help? LooK HERE!

"That's a Volga. It's the real man's car. I used to have one with a body entirely out of steel. Thick steel. The fuel economy sucked, but I think it was bulletproof." - Pavr, some guy from Fark whom JoT knows.
My Heatware
LogRus is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 04-16-05, 08:49 PM   #13
whozyodaddy
Member



Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: California

 
Great Guide!
A great quick reference for router/hub/firewall setup is www.portforward.com
Forward your ports for faster internet preformance on various applications.
whozyodaddy is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 04-17-05, 02:33 PM   #14
eatmyshorts7569
Member

 
eatmyshorts7569's Avatar 

Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Laguna Niguel

 
Yes these guys are great. Thats how i got my photos. most of them any ways.
eatmyshorts7569 is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 06-06-06, 02:25 AM   #15
erusfatum
Member



Join Date: Feb 2006

 
using "101 - Sharing Internet using a Router" do i need to ask(buy) the ISP more IPs?
erusfatum is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 09-05-07, 05:29 PM   #16
Cfn Nexus
Member

 
Cfn Nexus's Avatar 

Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

 
Could this be updated to include making a secondary network. By this I mean cascading routers/switches and the associated configurations for Linksys and DLink routers? I've found all the newer DSL modem/routers are becoming common, and adding your own network is not easy, trying to go between ISP's and Linksys/DLink. I recently tried to use a supplied Siemens Gigaset DE657 from my ISP with a Linksys Gaming Wireless Router 330N (to use it's better firmware and Policies) and had a hell of a time setting up the network so that the Linksys was a 192.168.2.1 network and used the Siemens as a modem only.
Cfn Nexus is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 05-29-08, 10:10 AM   #17
EmAn
Member

 
EmAn's Avatar 

Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Ft. Hood Texas

 
I think I want to make a subnetting one of these... hmmmm....... great guide so far for those who need to know!

to Cfn Nexus: With most linksys/dlink ISR's you will just be able to use a straight through from one of the network sockets (not the WAN or "modem socket") of the first ISR to the WAN port on the secondary ISR.... I have not tested doing that with a crossover cable but it should work.

__________________
Cooler Master HAF 932 Asus P5Q-PRO E8400 4050mhz
Tuniq Tower 120 Crossfire Diamond HD4850's 512mb a piece
2x2 GB OCZ DDR2 1066 Platinum OCZ GameXStream 600W

SPC in the US ARMY working on AH-64D Appache Longbow Attack Helicopters
Yes I work on a $47,000,000 computer that has two jet engines attached to it A LOT of spinning parts and of course... Rockets, GUNS, and Missiles
EmAn is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 05-14-09, 06:12 AM   #18
drechana
New Member



Join Date: May 2009

 
This is a nice guide for people new to networking and i applaud you
You might be able to help me with this little thing though. I have been to a job interview and I belive that me getting the job rests on coming up with a solution to thier very badly organised network.
There are 4 offices, 2 of them are a few doors up from each other then there is one about 70 miles away and another a couple of hundred miles away.
None of them are linked at the moment so basically i need to write up a network project outlining how i would network these 4 offices together and how much it would cost and so on.
I have a while to do it so really the first thing I need to know is....how would i interconnect these 4 locations?

Cheers
Jim
drechana is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 03-02-12, 11:37 AM   #19
itshondo
Member

 
itshondo's Avatar 

Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Denver, CO

 

__________________
MAIN RIG - PCLinuxOS -Biostar A780L3G - Plenom II 560 @ 3.7 Ghz - Cooler Master TX3 - 8 gb Corsair XMS - Zotac GT 430 Fanless - 60gb Corsair SSD + 2 - Sony Optiarc SATA DVD Burner

Windows / Backup RIG
- Win 7 64 - Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3P rev 1.6 - Q9550 @ 3.2 Ghz - Prolimatech Megahalems Rev. B HSF - 8gb GSkill PC2 6400- Evga GTX 260 - Antec 900 Case - Rosewill RP550-2 550W PSU - WD 74 GB Raptor + 2 - Sony Optiarc SATA DVD Burner


HEATWARE 20-0-0
itshondo is offline   QUOTE Thanks
Old 03-22-13, 01:23 AM   #20
tonymalo
Disabled



Join Date: Mar 2013

 
To know about vpn, we can have it in our homes too. You need to choose best service provider for this purpose. I used uk vpn service and they ere really wesome. You pleae all try them too. Thaks fo sharing valuable information above.

Hats off!
tonymalo is offline   QUOTE Thanks

Post Reply New Thread Subscribe


Overclockers Forums > Software > Internet, Networking, and Security
Internet, Networking, and Security Networking and Viruses/Malware trouble. Get the answers here.
Forum Jump

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Mobile Skin
All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:17 PM.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
You can add these icons by updating your profile information to include your Heatware ID, Benching Profile ID or your Folding/SETI profile ID. Edit your profile!
X

Welcome to Overclockers.com

Create your username to jump into the discussion!

New members like you have made this the best community on the Internet since 1998!


(4 digit year)

Why Join Us?

  • Share experience
  • Max out your hardware
  • Best forum members anywhere
  • Customized forum experience

Already a member?