G.SKill Demos DDR4 4266MHz and DDR4 4311MHz Memory Kits at IDF

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G.Skill continues to push the boundaries of DDR4 memory speeds and are showcasing their new TridentZ at IDF this week. On display are two TridentZ kits running at 4266 MHz and 4133 MHz respectively. Here is the press release we just received.

G.SKILL Demos DDR4 4266MHz and DDR4 4133MHz Memory Kits at IDF 2015

Taipei, Taiwan (19 August 2015) – G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world’s leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory solid state storage, power supplies, and gaming peripherals, demos two ultra-fast DDR4 memory kits at DDR4 4266MHz 8GB (2x4GB) and DDR4 4133MHz 8GB (2x4GB) extreme speed at the Intel IDF 2015 event this week.

G.SKILL_IDF15_SF_Overall_LiveDemo
G.SKILL_IDF15_SF_Screen_LiveDemo

Featuring the latest 6th Generation Intel Core processors and Z170 motherboards, G.SKILL is pushing dual channel DDR4 speed to new heights. The DDR4 4266MHz 8GB (2x4GB) kit is demoed on the Intel Core i7-6700K processor and ASRock Z170 OC Formula overclocking motherboard, while the DDR4 4133MHz kit is demoed on the Intel Core i7-6700K CPU and ASUS ROG Maximus VIII Hero motherboard. Both kits represent the fastest DDR4 memory speed ever seen on live air-cooling demo systems.

G.SKILL_IDF15_SF_4266MHz_LiveDemo
G.SKILL_IDF15_SF_4133MHz_LiveDemo

“We are truly excited to demo such extremely high memory speed on live demo systems, since DDR4 4000+MHz speeds were traditionally only achievable under extreme overclocking on liquid nitrogen cooling,” says Frank Hung, Product Marketing at G.SKILL. “We see amazing performance potential for the new DDR4 memory technology on the newest Intel platform, and very excited to see where it will take us in the near future.”

About G.SKILL

Established in 1989 by PC hardware enthusiasts, G.SKILL specializes in high performance memory and SSD products, designed for PC gamers and enthusiasts around the world. Combining technical innovation and rock solid quality through our in-house testing lab and talented R&D team, G.SKILL continues to create record-breaking memory for each generation of hardware and hold the no. 1 brand title in overclocking memory.

Dino DeCesari (Lvcoyote)

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Discussion
  1. On X99 stock uncore is already bottlenecking DDR4-2133 memory. Whatever people are saying, it's hard to stabilize it above 3500MHz even though you can see 5000MHz in quick benchmarks.

    It's hard to compare Z170 to X99 platform. You can reach quad channel ~2666 performance at about 3600 dual channel but only at higher cache frequency and assuming you are comparing 6 core 2011-3 CPU to 4 core 1151. It's more like a theory as on X99 you can set it fully stable while on Z170 on current memory it's barely possible. 8 core i7 will reach higher max memory bandwidth.

    There is always some advantage from running memory at higher clock like lower latency so if you can set memory higher then why not.
    Woomack
    In my tests so far it's like 2x8GB ( dual rank ) = max ~3466, 1x8GB ( dual rank ) = max 3866, 2x4GB ( single rank ) = max 3733, 1x4GB ( single rank ) = max 4050.

    Everything above ~3600 depends in big part from motherboard and IMC. Motherboard manufacturers are guaranteeing work only up to 3200 while everything above is marked as OC ( even though it was tested, they can't guarantee it will work with all available memory kits ). Also almost all 3466+ memory kits tested and approved so far are based on single rank modules ( 2x4 or 4x4GB ).

    I just don't think that most 6600K/6700K and most available motherboards can run stable at 4000+.


    I wonder at what memory frequency the bandwidth/latency exceeds the advantage of having an extra memory channel? For example, does 1 channel of a single rank, 4 GB DIMM @ 4050 MHz. exceed the bandwidth or lower the latency of having two channels of single, rank, 4 GB DIMM's @ 3733 MHz.?

    What kind the effect does having the cache/uncore operating at a lower operating frequency than the memory? For example, the limit of the cache/uncore on my i7-5820 is < 3650 MHz (probably because of the Asrock x99 motherboard), if I were running my memory faster than this would my uncore/cache be bottlenecking my memory?
    In my tests so far it's like 2x8GB ( dual rank ) = max ~3466, 1x8GB ( dual rank ) = max 3866, 2x4GB ( single rank ) = max 3733, 1x4GB ( single rank ) = max 4050.

    Everything above ~3600 depends in big part from motherboard and IMC. Motherboard manufacturers are guaranteeing work only up to 3200 while everything above is marked as OC ( even though it was tested, they can't guarantee it will work with all available memory kits ). Also almost all 3466+ memory kits tested and approved so far are based on single rank modules ( 2x4 or 4x4GB ).

    I just don't think that most 6600K/6700K and most available motherboards can run stable at 4000+.
    I read a whitepaper article recently that stated that the number of ranks in a DIMM limited the frequency at which it could run. I think the capacity of a DDR module is tied to the number of ranks it has. For some old Westmere-based IBM x3550-M3 servers, full speed, 1600MHz operation was only possible if one DDR3 DIMM was installed per channel. I wonder if this is why they're only offering DIMM's in 2x4GiB configurations.