G.Skill Officially Announces Ripjaws 4 Series DDR4 Memory Kits

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With the rapidly approaching release of Haswell-E CPUs and X99 motherboards to support them, G.Skill has officially announced their entry into the DDR4 memory market. Beginning at speeds of 2133 MHz and climbing up to 3200 MHz, these kits will be available in 16 GB, 32 GB, and 64 GB quad-channel configurations. The lower frequency kits will operate at an astoundingly low voltage of 1.20 V, while the higher frequency kits will need 1.35 V. You’ll also be able to choose from three different colors… black, red, or blue.

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Here is the press release just as we received it from G.Skill.

G.SKILL Officially Announces

Ripjaws 4 Series DDR4 Memory Kits

Extreme Speed Available Up to DDR4 3200MHz

Taipei, Taiwan – 22 August 2014 – G.SKILL International Co., Ltd., the leading high performance memory designer and manufacturer, reveals the long awaited next generation Ripjaws 4 series DDR4 memory kits! Featuring all new redesigned heatspreaders in three different colors, high performance frequencies, high capacity, DDR4 quad-channel ready, and ultra low voltages, the Ripjaws 4 series is all the benefits of DDR4 rolled into one sleek package.

Extreme Performance from 2133MHz to 3200MHz!!

With a standard of 2133MHz, DDR4 is the next generation definition of performance. Also available in 2400MHz, 2666MHz, 2800MHz, 3000MHz, and 3200MHz, the starting lineup is continuing where DDR3 left off. With capacities starting at 16GB (4GBx4), 32GB (8GBx4 / 4GBx8) and 64GB (8GBx8), your new X99 platform will have more memory space to do what you need it to do. That’s not all! Ripjaws 4 also has an ultra low voltage rating of 1.2V for kits under 2800MHz and 1.35V for 3000/3200MHz!

XMP 2.0 Support on Next Gen Intel® X99 Quad Channel Platforms

Sometimes, simplicity is best. Ripjaws 4 series memory kits above 2400MHz support Intel XMP 2.0 for automatic and trouble-free tuning. Working closely with the major performance motherboard partners, Ripjaws 4 series DDR4 memory are validated for compatibility with most upcoming X99 motherboards with a series of rigorous tests under quad channel memory operations. It’s guaranteed to provide the best-in-class performance, compatibility, and stability with a wide range of X99 motherboards.

All-New Designed Heatspreaders Available in 3 Colors

As the 4th evolution of the Ripjaws series, Ripjaws 4 is outfitted with an all-new designed heatspreader. Available in Red, Blue, and Black! And don’t worry; Ripjaws 4 has a module height of 40mm – the same height as previous Ripjaws family modules – and will be compatible with most CPU heatsinks!

About G.SKILL

Established in 1989 by PC hardware enthusiasts, G.SKILL specializes in high performance memory and SSD products, designed for PC gamers and enthusiasts around the world. Combining technical innovation and rock solid quality through our in-house testing lab and talented R&D team, G.SKILL continues to create record-breaking memory for each generation of hardware and hold the no. 1 brand title in overclocking memory.

G.Skill was kind enough to send along one of the 16 GB 3000 MHz kits for us to review, so look for that real soon!
Dino DeCesari (Lvcoyote)

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Discussion
  1. ATMINSIDE
    You left out a key part here, the speeds at those given timings.


    Actually I didn't. I just haven't seen it so important to add it there.

    You can compare DDR1 Winbond BH5/6 CL1.5-2 2.7V+ to Hynix/Promos DDR-400 CL3 kits at 2.5V , Micron D9 DDR2-800 4-3-3/4-4-4 1.8-2V to Qimonda/Promos DDR2-800 5-6-6/6-6-6 1.8V or DDR3-1600 Elpida/Qimonda/PSC 6-6-6/7-7-7/6-7-6 to DDR3-1600 Hynix/Nanya/Micron 9-9-9/10-10-10.

    In all cases older memory was running at tighter timings. If you need higher clocks then here you are:

    DDR1: 500-550 2-2-2/Winbond , later available only Samsungs CL2.5/3-4-4 500+

    DDR2: 1066-1200 4-4-4/5-5-5 Microns , later available only Promos/Qimonda 1066-1200 5-6-6/6-6-6

    DDR3: 2400/2500 PSC 9-11-9 , now we have 2400 CL10-12-12 or 11-13-13 kits and any higher clock require more relaxed timings so performance drop

    You don't think that overclockers keep benching on older memory just because they like retro stuff ...
    Woomack
    Actually older memory had always tighter timings but newer had higher density. The same for DDR1, DDR2 and DDR3. Also newer were usually running at lower voltages.

    Example:

    DDR1: Winbond chips at CL1.5-2 but 256MB modules up to 3.2V -> Samsung/Hynix at CL3 but 512-1024MB modules 2.5V

    DDR2: Micron D9 CL4-5 512-1024MB modules up to 2.4V -> Promos/PSC/Qimonda 1024-4096MB CL5-6 1.8V

    DDR3: Micron D9/ Qimonda / Elpida CL6/7 1-2GB modules 1.65-2.0V -> Samsung/Hynix/Micron CL9/10 4-8GB modules 1.25-1.65V

    First DDR4 will be closer to JEDEC specification but I expect that binning for high end series will start soon and we will see higher clocked memory running at tighter timings.


    You left out a key part here, the speeds at those given timings.
    ATMINSIDE
    Of course tighter timing stuff will come around later. Just like DDR, DDR2, and DDR3 did...

    Speeds will go up more, timings will come down. They need time to refine the process.


    Actually older memory had always tighter timings but newer had higher density. The same for DDR1, DDR2 and DDR3. Also newer were usually running at lower voltages.

    Example:

    DDR1: Winbond chips at CL1.5-2 but 256MB modules up to 3.2V -> Samsung/Hynix at CL3 but 512-1024MB modules 2.5V

    DDR2: Micron D9 CL4-5 512-1024MB modules up to 2.4V -> Promos/PSC/Qimonda 1024-4096MB CL5-6 1.8V

    DDR3: Micron D9/ Qimonda / Elpida CL6/7 1-2GB modules 1.65-2.0V -> Samsung/Hynix/Micron CL9/10 4-8GB modules 1.25-1.65V

    First DDR4 will be closer to JEDEC specification but I expect that binning for high end series will start soon and we will see higher clocked memory running at tighter timings.
    Robert17
    Although I'd seen some European pricing on DDR4 earlier at around $2/Gb, the NewEgg reference above indicates less. And this article indicates that there will be some competition due to added capacity in the supply chain.

    http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20140828PR200.html


    Most European prices will include import fees and VAT.
    Although I'd seen some European pricing on DDR4 earlier at around $2/Gb, the NewEgg reference above indicates less. And this article indicates that there will be some competition due to added capacity in the supply chain.

    http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20140828PR200.html
    Hi Guys,

    There is a lot of misconception about DDR4 out in the wilds, but I found a great DDR4 White Paper that Corsair has on their web site. It's a great read and will explain the thrust behind DDR4, what it means initially, and what it means going forward. Will more than likely answer most of the questions people have at this point.

    http://www.corsair.com/~/media/Corsair/download-files/manuals/dram/DDR4-White-Paper.pdf
    ATMINSIDE
    Infinite, do what EarthDog did here.

    Lower nanosecond = better.


    I see. Ok. So. CL11 2400mhz ram would be 4.58ns. Not bad. Would be better at CL10 of course.
    I am not sure about the headroom thing... Its not like you will be able to raise these to 1.65v from 1.2...without some kind of better cooling (not ambient) I would guess...
    Infinite66
    If someone could be so kind as to enlighten me. Is 2400mhz CL11 ddr3 better or equivalent to 2400mhz CL16 ddr4? Voltages aside of course. The ddr4 starting at 1.2v hopefully means a whole lot of OC headroom


    EarthDog
    You get benefits (in gaming) up to around 2133MHz unless you are using the iGPU of either Intel or AMD as they use system ram for vram so the faster it is, the faster your iGPU is as well. ;)

    Its simply a natural progression.

    On LN2 maybe...http://www.jagatreview.com/2013/06/corsair-pamerkan-prototype-corsair-vengeance-pro-3200-mhz-cl11-di-computex-2013/

    Just a side note on some of the timings/speed relationship here...

    You can work out RAM access time this way: ( CL / Frequency ) * 1000.

    CL16 / 3200 MHz * 1K = 5ns

    15 / 3200 * 1K = 4.68ns

    8 / 1600 * 1000 = 5ns

    Though it should be obvious that the 3200MHz has more bandwidth. ;)


    Infinite, do what EarthDog did here.

    Lower nanosecond = better.
    If someone could be so kind as to enlighten me. Is 2400mhz CL11 ddr3 better or equivalent to 2400mhz CL16 ddr4? Voltages aside of course. The ddr4 starting at 1.2v hopefully means a whole lot of OC headroom
    but I just got DDR3! ;)

    Seriously, that's fast... and at that voltage I would expect it will be easier on your motherboard, if it behaves the same as high voltage DDR3 did... Guess we will have to see when folks start playing with it.
    ATMINSIDE
    Of course tighter timing stuff will come around later. Just like DDR, DDR2, and DDR3 did...

    Speeds will go up more, timings will come down. They need time to refine the process.


    Agree, possibly have to get a hold me over kit if I jump on this platform :)
    Witchdoctor
    I am hopeful some tighter stuff will hit the streets.

    One thing this does confirm, a high end x99 set up will not be for the faint of heart


    Of course tighter timing stuff will come around later. Just like DDR, DDR2, and DDR3 did...

    Speeds will go up more, timings will come down. They need time to refine the process.
    Witchdoctor
    Even the 2400 is cas15 :(


    Again, it's all about access time.

    That's the "entry" level of DDR4, which is roughly equivalent to DDR3 1600 CAS9, which we called standard to mid level for DDR3.
    Witchdoctor
    Wow, that stuff is loose :(


    EarthDog
    You get benefits (in gaming) up to around 2133MHz unless you are using the iGPU of either Intel or AMD as they use system ram for vram so the faster it is, the faster your iGPU is as well. ;)

    Its simply a natural progression.

    On LN2 maybe...http://www.jagatreview.com/2013/06/corsair-pamerkan-prototype-corsair-vengeance-pro-3200-mhz-cl11-di-computex-2013/

    Just a side note on some of the timings/speed relationship here...

    You can work out RAM access time this way: ( CL / Frequency ) * 1000.

    CL16 / 3200 MHz * 1K = 5ns

    15 / 3200 * 1K = 4.68ns

    8 / 1600 * 1000 = 5ns

    Though it should be obvious that the 3200MHz has more bandwidth. ;)


    Not really that loose in terms of access time....