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Some Scorching Numbers

We pointed out the other day that Prescott is simply too hot.

A few places provided measurements of just how hot Prescott is compared to Northwood using Intel’s standard cooling, and another test (under somewhat overvolted condition) shows that Prescott turns a watercooling into a water heating system.

What is frightening about Prescott is that these results represent winter-like temps for this processor compared to what will happen when the chip ramps and/or is overclocked.

The Intel datasheets show (rather questionably( that the 2.8 and 3.0 both chew up 89 watts of power, while the 3.2 and 3.4 chew up 103 watts of power.

This tells us that from every 400MHz ramp of Prescott, we should expect it to chew up at least another 14 watts.

Let’s assume the best for Intel and presume 89 watts for a 3.0E and 103 watts for a 3.4E.

Project that 14 extra watts per 400MHz upward, and you get:

Projected Prescott Wattages: Default Voltage
CPU

3.0GHz

3.4GHz

3.8GHz

4.2GHz

4.6GHz

5.0GHz

Wattage

89

103

117

131

145

159

Of course, it is not likely at the higher speeds that default voltage will do, so let’s apply Ohm’s Law (wattage increases by the square of the percentage increase in voltage) and see what happens when you overvolt by a modest 10%.

Projected Prescott Wattages: 10% Overvoltage
CPU

3.0GHz

3.4GHz

3.8GHz

4.2GHz

4.6GHz

5.0GHz

Wattage

108

124

142

158

175

192