Iwill KA266-R DDR Motherboard

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SUMMARY: DDR is coming and there are real performance improvements – Iwill is first out of the blocks with the KA266-R.

Iwill KA266-R

The board measures 12″ x 9.58″ – larger than the ASUS A7V; serial # 29. It also has a nice “power on” green diode at the bottom left.

PC Nut just got back from COMDEX with the Iwill KA266-R DDR motherboard in tow – no DDR RAM. I have DDR RAM (Crucial Engineering Sample). So we got together to run this board through its paces. Rather than wind-up with the benchmarks we ran this morning, let’s see what this board can do:

Iwill KA266-R Benchmarks
Setup/Benchmark

Result

700 MHz (7 x 100 FSB)

 
Quake Hi Quality

108.6/109.9

Quake Fastest

119.6/120.3

Quake “Special”

151.2/155.7

3DMark 2000 Default

6192

3DMark 2000 800/600/16

6744

SiSoft CPU

2196/976

SiSoft MultiMedia

2386/3274

SiSoft Memory

392/538

933 MHz (7 x 133 FSB)

 
Quake Hi Quality

131.8/137.7

Quake Fastest

161.0/161.8

Quake “Special”

203.6/209.5

3DMark 2000 Default

7038

3DMark 2000 800/600/16

8288

SiSoft CPU

2936/1303

SiSoft MultiMedia

3179/4368

SiSoft Memory

535/728

956 MHz (6.5 x 146 FSB)

 
Quake Hi Quality

134.6/140.4

Quake Fastest

167.3/168.0

Quake “Special”

211.5/217.9

3DMark 2000 Default

7116

3DMark 2000 800/600/16

8458

SiSoft CPU

2998/1331

SiSoft MultiMedia

3246/4461

SiSoft Memory

560/773

T-Bird Blue Core 750 MHz, 1.7 v, 128 MB Crucial DDR 7.5ns RAM, Leadtek GTS2, Global Win FOP38, “Special” = all options off, simple items on. There are no asynchronous RAM settings or V Core adjustments on this board.

Note SiSandra’s Memory scores – damn impressive! This is the one area we will see major gains over the next year or so. Good news for bandwidth intensive games like Quake.

Comparing these results to an Intel PIII 700E running 1050 MHz (HERE), it looks like Iwill’s DDR board at 956 MHz outperforms the PIII 700E on an Iwill VD133 Pro at 1050 MHz:

Benchmark

PIII 700E @ 1050 MHz

TBird 750 @ 956 MHz

Quake

158.2/147.2

167.3/168.0

3DMark 2000

8386

8458

SiSoft CPU

2388/1406

2998/1331

SiSoft Memory

415/466

560/773

NOTE: These are not “head to head” tests – comparisons are indicative only.

Rob over at PC Nut will be running more benches over the weekend. We didn’t try pushing the CPU beyond 956 MHz due to the lack of V Core settings – the CPU will do in excess of 1100 MHz at 1.85 volts. Looks like Rob will do the pencil thing on the L7 bridges to bump the voltage up.

One thing I found was that, at the speeds we ran, there were no hotspots on the board; the power transistors were barely warm to the touch – same for all other chips. Even the Northbridge heatsink was barely warm. I would still put an active cooler on it except that it is glued on – no mounting holes for something like a Lasagna chip cooler.

There is one item that is very important: The CPU fan header was not able to spin the Delta 38 cfm fan to full speed. This may be an anomaly with this board, but use caution with high wattage fans on these headers.

Overall, the board was very stable – we did not run exhaustive tests, but it handled everything we threw at it. We did find that it would not power off two times, although this is more likely a Windows problem. More benchmarks and endurance testing to come.

Iwill KA266-R: Key Features
  • FSBs: 100, 101, 102, 103, 105, 107, 110, 120, 126, 133, 136, 137, 140, 142, 146
  • Multiplier Settings: Dipswitch, 5x to 12.5x
  • FSB Settings: BIOS or Jumpers
  • DDR RAM Slots: 3 – up to 3 GB
  • VCore Adjustment: NO
  • Asynchronous RAM Settings: NO
  • CPU Temp Monitoring: Thermistor in Socket A
  • Fan Headers: 3
  • CPU Speeds Supported: 650 to 1200 MHz
  • Drives: On Board RAID
  • Accept SDRAM: NO, DDR Only

AVAILABILITY: Probably end December, no pricing yet.

Iwill KA266-R Socket

Lots of nice room for aggressive heatsinks.

Iwill KA266-R Go

Loaded with the AMD T-Bird Blue Core 750, GlobalWin FOP38 and 128 MB Crucial 133 MHz 7.5 ns DDR RAM; note AMR slot.

Iwill KA266-R Power Transistors

Looks like there are 8 power transistors – if so, speaks a lot to the stability we had with the board.

Many, many thanks to Humphrey and Rob at PC Nut for interrupting their busy workday to run these tests with me.

Email Joe


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