Lian Li PC-O8 Case Review

Add Your Comments

Today for your reading pleasure, a product that’s hot off the assembly line from Lian Li! This is their brand new PC-O8 ATX cube case. A completely new design to the Lian Li lineup, this case is set for the top-end of the market. Kick back, grab your reading glasses, and see what sets this apart from other cube cases out there.

Product Specifications

First up, here’s a look at the product specifications straight from the Lian Li website:

Model PC-O8X
Case Type Mid Chassis
Dimensions (W) 341mm
(H) 428mm
(D) 404mm
Color Black
Front Panel Tempered Glass
Side Panel Tempered Glass
Body Material Aluminum
Net Weight 9.5kg
5.25″ Drive Bays None
Drive Bays 3.5″ HDD x6
2.5″ HDD x2
Expansion Slot 8
M/B Type ATX
Micro-ATX
E-ATX (322mmx272mm)
System Fan Front: 120mm fan x3
Rear: 120mm fan x1
HDD Rack: 120mm fan x2
Top: 120mm fan x2(Optional)
I/O Ports USB3.0 x 4
HD Audio
Maximum Compatibility VGA length: 370mm
PSU length: 298mm
Cooler height: 170mm
Space of Radiator Top: 120 x 240 x 54 mm
Front: 120 x 360 x 70 mm
PSU Type ATX PSU
LED LED RGB Color Changing Kit (LED50RGB-2)

And next is a feature list from Lian Li:

  • Two Compartments
    Through the front glass panel, the PC-O8 is divided into two zones. Zone 1 allows DIY enthusiasts to show off their motherboard and graphics cards through the edge-to-edge side panel windows. On the other side of the motherboard tray, Zone 2 gives plenty of room for cables and less eye-catching components such as hard drives and the power supply.
  • Adjustable RGB Interior Lighting
    DIY enthusiasts can adjust the interior lighting through the included RGB lighting kit complete with LED strips, cord clip, dimmer and controller. The back mounted controller allows instant analog color selection.
  • Tremendous Water Cooling Support
    With plenty of room to work with, installing elaborate water cooling setups is simplified in the PC-O8. In Zone 1 the top panel can support a 240mm radiator, while in Zone 2 the front intake can house a 360mm radiator in a push/pull configuration.
  • Modular Hard Drive Cage
    The PC-O8 chassis supports up to six 3.5″ drives and two 2.5″ drives in the removable drive cage in Zone 2. This HDD cage is actively cooled via two mounted 120mm fans.
  • Tool-Less Installations and Features
    The PC-O8 has many tool-less features allowing for simple setups and installations. This aluminum and tempered glass chassis features easily-removable panels, tool-less mounting for hard drives as well as slide-in dust filters.
  • Versatile Cable Management Design
    Clamps on the reverse side of the motherboard tray can be adjusted and positioned for optimal cable management setups.
  • Hardware Capability
    The PC-O8 does not restrict hardware capability. Graphics cards up to 370mm (14.5”) and CPU coolers up to 170mm (6.7”) are supported. Additionally, PSUs of all sizes are supported with clearance of 298mm (11.7”).
  • Connectivity
    The top I/O panel includes four USB 3.0 ports and HD audio connections.

Packaging

This is going to be a very critical portion to the market success of this case. More so than other cases, as the PC-O8 has two tempered glass panels. As you’d expect from a quality company like Lian Li, this case showed up safely at my door even though it shipped straight from their manufacturing location in Taiwan. And I live in North Carolina. If it can survive that trip, the ones shipped in bulk and then going for a short trip after purchase will be plenty safe!

Enough talking, pictures speak a thousand words! Below you can see the shipping box and Styrofoam packaging around the case itself.

PC-O8 Shipping Box

PC-O8 Shipping Box

PC-O8 Case Packaging

PC-O8 Case Packaging

And next up is the packaging for the tempered glass panels. They’re nestled safely in Styrofoam lined cardboard, separate from the case itself. Each piece of glass has Styrofoam on all sides to keep it safe from any other components (even from the other pieces of glass).

PC-O8 Glass Panel Packaging - 1

PC-O8 Glass Panel Packaging – 1

PC-O8 Glass Panel Packaging - 2

PC-O8 Glass Panel Packaging – 2

PC-O8 Glass Panel Packaging - 3

PC-O8 Glass Panel Packaging – 3

Accessories and Spare Parts

The accessory package for this case is quite impressive, it includes the following:

  • (5) 3-pin to Molex Fan Adapters
  • Case Speaker
  • USB3.0 to 2.0 Converter (for front ports)
  • (2) Cable Management Clamps
  • (3) Cable Ties
  • (8) Rubber Dampers for 2.5″ HDD’s
  • (4) PSU Mounting Screws
  • (12) Motherboard Mounting Screws
  • (3) Extra Motherboard Standoff Screws
  • (25) Thumb Screws for 3.5″ HDD’s
  • (8) Screws for 2.5″ HDD’s
  • (8) Thumb Screws for Glass Panels
  • (2) Spare Side Panel Clips
  • (3) RGB LED Strip

A few things that are great to see here are the USB3.0 to 2.0 converter, which lets you still use all four USB ports on the front if your motherboard only has one header, the Molex fan adapters, as a lot of motherboards don’t have enough headers for six fans, and the spare clips for the side panels. I’m not sure what else Lian Li could include with this case in the way of accessories or spare parts, this is very all inclusive.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Accessories

Lian Li PC-O8 – Accessories

An Outside Look

Now for the moment you’ve all been waiting for, a look at the PC-O8 itself. This case has a very sleek design that stems from being simple, clean, and classy. The construction of the case is all brushed black aluminum, most likely anodized, and is very sturdy despite the light weight. The only parts that aren’t aluminum are the front and side panels, which are made of tinted, tempered glass. On top is a removable aluminum plate that allows you to use a 240 mm radiator, more on that and the AIO mount that’s there later.

Lian Li PC-O8

Lian Li PC-O8

And turning the case around to see the back shows more of the same. Simple, functional, classy, but wait… what are those three knobs there by the PSU cutout? Those are the built-in RGB LED strip controller that Lian Li put in this case. The strip itself isn’t installed when you get the case, but the controller is, making it a plug-and-play system.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Rear View

Lian Li PC-O8 – Rear View

Last for this section, we look at the bottom of the case. Here you can see the feet that are made of aluminum with rubber bottoms on them. Sturdy enough for even the heaviest of water cooled systems, but the rubber is very low profile so it doesn’t show unless you’re looking at the bottom of the case.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Bottom View

Lian Li PC-O8 – Bottom View

Interior and Features

Time to take a look through the innards and niceties of the PC-O8. Here’s a picture of the front of the case with the tinted glass panels removed.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Glass Removed

Lian Li PC-O8 – Glass Removed

Peeking around to the back with the rear panel removed shows off the HDD cage, one of the dust filters, and the PSU area. The accessories box comes taped into the removable HDD cage. This first dust filter will handle the air coming in to the 3×120 mm fans in front of the PSU. The HDD cage has two 120 mm fans mounted to it as well. The back panel pops off simply by pulling on it. It and the top panel are both completely tool-less in design.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Rear Panel Removed

Lian Li PC-O8 – Rear Panel Removed

Here’s a picture with this dust filter partially removed. To get to this state you simply pop off the top cover panel (it has no screws, only snaps) and then lift on the filter.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Dust Filter Raised

Lian Li PC-O8 – Dust Filter Raised

The other dust filter in this case is located in the top 2×120 mm slot, where the 240mm radiator mounting bracket is. Here’s a picture of the 240 mm radiator bracket and the top dust filter partially removed. This bracket is to allow room for the dust filter to be easily used with a radiator and/or fans in place. Alternatively, if you’d rather put the radiator in the rear 360 mm slot, this is possible as well. The grommet on the top right of the motherboard tray allows you to route AIO tubes through it!

Lian Li PC-O8 - Top Dust Filter

Lian Li PC-O8 – Top Dust Filter

Lian Li PC-O8 - AIO Bracket

Lian Li PC-O8 – 240mm Radiator Bracket

The front panel I/O is located on the front edge of the top of the case, this is due to the front itself being tempered glass. There are 4x USB3.0 ports, a 3.5 mm headphone and 3.5 mm microphone port, and the power button. In this picture you can also see the snaps for the top cover panel.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Front I/O

Lian Li PC-O8 – Front I/O

In the PC-O8, the whole HDD cage is removable. It also comes with rubber noise dampers installed for each of the six 3.5″ drives it will hold. Top that off with two 120 mm fans attached to the cage, and a nice, sturdy construction. Here’s a look at the cage.

Lian Li PC-O8 - HDD Cage - 1

Lian Li PC-O8 – HDD Cage – 1

Lian Li PC-O8 - HDD Cage - 2

Lian Li PC-O8 – HDD Cage – 2

Here’s a look at the fans that come pre-installed in the case, there’s six of these bad boys throughout the case. They’re quiet and move a decent amount of air, they’ll be sufficient for anyone that isn’t going with radiators everywhere. Lian Li has been known to use this Jamicon KF1225S1LSBR a few times in the past, so they must like these fans as well.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Case Fan

Lian Li PC-O8 – Case Fan

Putting it all Together

Okay, so I took this section’s title a bit literal… but here’s a list of the components I’ll be using in this case:

  • Intel i7 4790K @ 4 GHz
  • Cooler Master Glacer 240L
  • ASRock Z87 OC Formula/ac
  • G.SKILL TridentX 2x4GB 2400 9-11-10
  • 256GB Samsung 850 Pro
  • EVGA SuperNova G2 850W
  • EVGA GTX 970 FTW ACX 2.0
  • Swiftech PWM Splitter

Assembling components in this case is an absolute breeze. You have plenty of room to get around inside. Like most cases I started off by mounting the CPU, motherboard, RAM, and AIO before doing anything else.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Partially Built

Lian Li PC-O8 – Partially Built

That’s right, even oversize ATX and EATX boards have plenty of room in this beast of a case. After this I installed the GPU, all other components, and did the cable management.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Built

Lian Li PC-O8 – Built

Lian Li PC-O8 - Built 2

Lian Li PC-O8 – Built 2

Can you spot all the cables? There’s 2x 8-pin CPU power, 2x PCIe power, 2x USB3.0, front HD audio, power button/LED, and AIO power/signal all run in that last picture. The only one that was even slightly difficult was the 2x 8-pin CPU power, definitely do that before installing the AIO. Other than that, cable management in the PC-O8 is an absolute cake walk, it all goes in the rear compartment with a few zip ties.

Let me talk about my one gripe with this case though, before moving on to the final pictures. The PCIe bracket screws. Once you remove the cover over the PCIe bracket screws, it looks like it’d be easy to get to. I had problems with the screws coming up and hitting the edge of the case, making them hard to fully unscrew. Moving that cutout up a slight bit, using smaller screw heads, or moving the screws a tad would have solved this. Here’s a picture of that section, up close.

Lian Li PC-O8 - PCIe Bracket

Lian Li PC-O8 – PCIe Bracket

Now for some “completed” pictures! The tint on the glass gives a great view of the insides of the case, but can hide little cables from being easily seen. And there’s also a picture of the top of the case with the plate over the 240 mm radiator area removed, revealing a nice metal mesh that hides the dust filter from view.

Lian Li PC-O8 - Completed 1

Lian Li PC-O8 – Completed 1

Lian Li PC-O8 - Completed 2

Lian Li PC-O8 – Completed 2

Lian Li PC-O8 - Completed 3

Lian Li PC-O8 – Completed 3

Lian Li PC-O8 - Completed 4

Lian Li PC-O8 – Completed 4

Testing Temperatures

For a quick temperature comparison we’ll run both Intel Burn Test and Unigine Heaven at the same time. The first picture is from the test being run on my open air test bench and the second is with all the components inside the PC-O8. Both tests were done on the same Windows install and on the exact same hardware. As seen below, the GPU temperatures are very comparable to what I got on the test bench and better on the CPU.

Stress Test Temperatures - Test Bench

Stress Test Temperatures – Test Bench

Stress Test Temperatures - Lian Li PC-O8

Stress Test Temperatures – Lian Li PC-O8

Final Thoughts and Conclusion

The Lian Li PC-O8 is a perfect example of a high quality case that’s loaded with features. It is a large case, but the dual zone design allows it to be shorter than most mid tower cases. With the new trend toward cube cases it was inevitable that Lian Li designed one, and they did a superb job. Almost every aspect of the PC-O8 is completely tool-less, making assembly an absolute breeze. My only gripe with the case were the PCIe screws, but with a little patience those work fine.

Temperature testing shows that this case has good ventilation, even keeping up with my open air test bench. The included fans produce no more than a low hum which is easily masked by any soft music playing. There shouldn’t be any issues with noise or temperature from this case, whatsoever. Build quality is absolutely top notch, being that all pieces of this case are either a black anodized and brushed aluminum or tempered glass.

Of course with all these features, build quality, and a modern design comes a price tag. Add to this that Lian Li is already a top of the line case brand and you get an MSRP of $395. This puts the PC-O8 as one of the more expensive cases on the market, but I feel the price is justified after having the privilege to work with this case. Microcenter will be the first to see this case, with other retailers to follow shortly after.

Overall, this case is easy to build in, is built with the best materials, and offers superb component and water cooling support. If you have the budget, don’t hesitate to get one.

Overclockers_clear_approvedClick the stamp for an explanation of what this means.

-Austin (ATMINSIDE)

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Discussion
  1. If dust is an issue make sure you have more intake than exhaust and have all intake areas filtered.

    I don't have the case any longer, I simply didn't have a system for it. If I still kept an ATX sized system for my gaming rig I would absolutely still have it.
    If I go for this, it would be by far the most expensive case I dare to look at, and I don't think I want to ruin it by hacking away at it. Replacing the rad seems the better option. This is for a lightly overclocked CPU and I didn't need such a big rad in the first place.

    Do you still have/use the case? I'm also wondering how often the glass might need cleaning as I'm finding dust a problem. Any long term comments on its general use?
    If I may revive this thread, I found out about this case on the weekend and have been trying to resist it. Those two glass surfaces look so good!

    Currently my main system is in a Corsair Air 540, and I now need more 3.5" bays than the 2 it has (excluding possibly adapting 5.25 bays). The PC-O8 seems ideal, as well as looking better. Then I noticed, if I'm correct the PC-O8 is built around 120mm fans? I'm running a 280mm (2x140) radiator, so would I be correct in assuming that isn't going to fit and look nice, if it can even fit at all? Would I need to replace it with a 120mm based rad?
    I still thinking about getting this case. Would this setup work? Also would it be a good idea? or should I go with a different AIO that does Exhaust?

    Front (Intake)

    Top: (Intake - AIO can only be mounted as a Intake)

    Rear: (Exhaust)

    HDD: (Exhaust)
    That's part of the reason I used Heaven for testing, since it's very hard on the GPU and runs for a long time.

    It'd take quite a long session to heat soak that side from what I've seen.
    PlotinusRedux
    Revan,

    The 540's airflow is definitely easier to see. But Atminside's empirical testing showed the GPU was well ventilated in the PC-o8, even though it's hard to see how that works. And I have to think Lian Li had good reasons for the design, I just wish they'd explain them.

    I'm still using the old Fortress FT02, which despite it's age is still one of the best airflow cases ever made. 3x180mm fans at the bottom blowing straight up over a 90 degree rotated MB so the graphics card is at the top of the case, with air from a 180mm on each side of it. It's a great case, though so heavy I had to make a wheeled cart for it to be able to move it around, but it completely lacks good radiator mounting sites, and I'm starting to get into water cooling just as a hobby, not really because of any benefits it gives.

    What I really like about the PC-o8 is the idea of mounting a 3x120mm radiator behind those 3 fans on the PSU/HDD side, so it's getting some of the benefits of an intake--fresh cool air from outside the case--without the usual downside of intake--blowing hot air over the MB. But I'm just going to have to understand how the MB side is getting cooled before I can pull the trigger on it. Lacking that, I'm looking at the 540 too.

    Money isn't really an issue at this point in my career or I wouldn't even be considering the PC-o8. If you're building with a budget, you'd definitely be better off with a cheaper case to free up money for more important hardware. For me, it's not really about pragmatic value at this point, its about blowing cash on a hobby I enjoy to reach an excessive ideal of water cooling that looks how I want it to look, but that in the end won't really even help the system's OC potential or longevity over a much cheaper case with air cooling. It's like looking at a Cadillac when you known a Camry is better on every practical measure.


    Money isn't an issue for me. But I have a feeling one side is going to get allot hotter then it suppose to. Unless your going to water cool everything, don't think it's good case for just air cooling.

    I was looking at core x9 but everything I have bought from thermaltake has not worked or felt cheap. Not sure if I wanted to risk it again with that company.
    Revan,

    The 540's airflow is definitely easier to see. But Atminside's empirical testing showed the GPU was well ventilated in the PC-o8, even though it's hard to see how that works. And I have to think Lian Li had good reasons for the design, I just wish they'd explain them.

    I'm still using the old Fortress FT02, which despite it's age is still one of the best airflow cases ever made. 3x180mm fans at the bottom blowing straight up over a 90 degree rotated MB so the graphics card is at the top of the case, with air from a 180mm on each side of it. It's a great case, though so heavy I had to make a wheeled cart for it to be able to move it around, but it completely lacks good radiator mounting sites, and I'm starting to get into water cooling just as a hobby, not really because of any benefits it gives.

    What I really like about the PC-o8 is the idea of mounting a 3x120mm radiator behind those 3 fans on the PSU/HDD side, so it's getting some of the benefits of an intake--fresh cool air from outside the case--without the usual downside of intake--blowing hot air over the MB. But I'm just going to have to understand how the MB side is getting cooled before I can pull the trigger on it. Lacking that, I'm looking at the 540 too.

    Money isn't really an issue at this point in my career or I wouldn't even be considering the PC-o8. If you're building with a budget, you'd definitely be better off with a cheaper case to free up money for more important hardware. For me, it's not really about pragmatic value at this point, its about blowing cash on a hobby I enjoy to reach an excessive ideal of water cooling that looks how I want it to look, but that in the end won't really even help the system's OC potential or longevity over a much cheaper case with air cooling. It's like looking at a Cadillac when you known a Camry is better on every practical measure.
    PlotinusRedux
    I'm just not getting the airflow on the MB side at all. It looks like without the radiator that side would have negative pressure and be pulling in air (and dust) through the PCI vents? I'm assuming the radiator must be pulling air into the case rather than exhausting it, and that's where your getting most of the air for that side?

    If you could just give a general sense of how air is flowing on that side I'd appreciate it.


    I had it on order, But had to cancel since their was no airflow to my GPU. It may not be same quality, I went with Corsair Air 540. I was going to get Core X9, However ever Thermaltake product I have owned had felt cheap or it didn't work. I wasn't going to risk it. Now I can spend the extra money on other things I need for my PC.
    ATMINSIDE
    ...One option could be for you to seal the PCI slots though...
    Unfortunately you can never make anything air tight enough to keep the dust here out, the only defense is to make sure air is going out any cracks rather than coming in them. I have 4 kids, 5 cats, a dog--if I stand still a few minutes I start collecting dust.

    But maybe even if there is negative pressure down by the graphics card, there's something crazy enough that it just might work--turning the MB side exhaust fan around to be an intake fan and slapping a filter on it, putting a 3x120 radiator on the PSU/HDD side rather than the top of the MB side, but still putting 2x120mm fans on the top of the MB side without a radiator slowing them down.

    That would insure positive pressure on the MB side; insure the main air flow went MB-->Radiator-->HDD/PSU, which is the ideal order and one reason to prefer a case that lets you isolate the radiator from the MB side in the first place, instead of Radiator-->MB; and give a 3x120mm radiator instead of a 2x120mm one.

    Though I suspect there's just something I'm not understanding that makes it better for the MB back fan to be exhaust rather than intake like they have it--I just can't imagine what it is.

    Anyway, I'm just thinking out loud at this point. Thanks again for your review and responses.
    PlotinusRedux
    Hmm, looking at it more, especially with the top intake through the radiator--I had assumed air was supposed to flow in from the front of the MB side, but it looks like air would actually flow out of the front of the MB side and around into the intake fans on the PSU/HDD side--which is maybe a good thing. I had been bothered by the thin side vent with a filter supposed to supply the 3x120mm at the front of the PSU/HDD side and somehow still move air over to the MB side--but maybe the point is for the vent to supply only part of the air so that the rest is pulled from the front of the MB side. Then on the MB side you would have air coming in from the top and splitting, with some going towards the back and out the exhaust fan and some going towards the front and around.

    That still doesn't explain how the GPU is staying so cool, though--but maybe just the amount of open space down there is helping. I hope it isn't pulling it's air in through the PCI vents.

    I'm in a very high dust environment, so the positive pressure question is make or break for me--if it's pulling in any unfiltered air I won't be able to see the MB in 6 months through the dust. I don't suppose you still have it set up? If you do, could you hold a piece of paper up to the PCI vents beneath the video card and see if it gets sucked up against the vents or blow away from them?

    Hopefully they'll post an airflow diagram at some point--it's clear something more complex than a standard case is going on, and it looks like having or not having a top intake fan/radiator would radically change the overall airflow.

    Thanks for the review and response, yours is the only review I've been able to find, and it did answer a lot of questions.


    I expect you're correct about the air flow, I just have no way to test it and see.

    I would say the amount of open space coupled with the amount of sit being pulled through the radiator toward the 3x120 do it.

    Sorry, I don't have it set up with components any more. They had to be moved to another case for a different review.

    One option could be for you to seal the PCI slots though.

    Glad I could be of assistance, wish I could have been of more.
    ATMINSIDE
    Yes, I had the radiator acting as an intake.

    I'm not sure the path it ended up taking though.


    Hmm, looking at it more, especially with the top intake through the radiator--I had assumed air was supposed to flow in from the front of the MB side, but it looks like air would actually flow out of the front of the MB side and around into the intake fans on the PSU/HDD side--which is maybe a good thing. I had been bothered by the thin side vent with a filter supposed to supply the 3x120mm at the front of the PSU/HDD side and somehow still move air over to the MB side--but maybe the point is for the vent to supply only part of the air so that the rest is pulled from the front of the MB side. Then on the MB side you would have air coming in from the top and splitting, with some going towards the back and out the exhaust fan and some going towards the front and around.

    That still doesn't explain how the GPU is staying so cool, though--but maybe just the amount of open space down there is helping. I hope it isn't pulling it's air in through the PCI vents.

    I'm in a very high dust environment, so the positive pressure question is make or break for me--if it's pulling in any unfiltered air I won't be able to see the MB in 6 months through the dust. I don't suppose you still have it set up? If you do, could you hold a piece of paper up to the PCI vents beneath the video card and see if it gets sucked up against the vents or blow away from them?

    Hopefully they'll post an airflow diagram at some point--it's clear something more complex than a standard case is going on, and it looks like having or not having a top intake fan/radiator would radically change the overall airflow.

    Thanks for the review and response, yours is the only review I've been able to find, and it did answer a lot of questions.
    I'm just not getting the airflow on the MB side at all. It looks like without the radiator that side would have negative pressure and be pulling in air (and dust) through the PCI vents? I'm assuming the radiator must be pulling air into the case rather than exhausting it, and that's where your getting most of the air for that side?

    If you could just give a general sense of how air is flowing on that side I'd appreciate it.
    ATMINSIDE
    1. Noise level is dependant upon what fans you use, but the ones included with this case are very quiet.

    2. My GPU stayed plenty cool and it was on air.

    3. I'm not sure if you could fit it, sorry. Either way you would have to take off the glass panel to access it.


    1. I have a bunch of BeQuiet Fans which don't go over 19 DBA.

    2. Ok Thanks, that is good to hear. Since I don't want to use reference card found in EVGA Copper Hydro if I do watercooling down the road.

    3. I don't have to plans to play around with it. I wanted to display so I can see temps and fan Speed. I was thinking maybe using could sided industrial Velcro.
    1. Noise level is dependant upon what fans you use, but the ones included with this case are very quiet.

    2. My GPU stayed plenty cool and it was on air.

    3. I'm not sure if you could fit it, sorry. Either way you would have to take off the glass panel to access it.
    I was thinking of buying this case or Corsair Air 540. If someone could help me

    1. Hows the noise level compared to other cases like Corsair and Phanteks?

    2. If you go Air Cooling does the case stay cooling enough?

    3. I know their is Zero Support for 5.25 Bays. Is their a way to put a single 5.25 cage at the bottom. I want to use my ROG OC Panel.