Rosewill Silent Night 500 W Fanless Power Supply

Sometimes even a quiet fan is too loud and for those situations Rosewill has you covered with their Silent Night PSU. It doesn’t have a loud fan. It doesn’t have a quiet fan. It doesn’t have a fan at all! The claim is that this makes it a 0dB PSU. It certainly goes a long way towards that goal, but fans aren’t the only source of noise from a PSU.

Features and Specifications

Rosewill.com’s product page is amazingly brief. There isn’t a features list, just a brief, incomplete, specs table. As such I’ve gone to Newegg’s product page and found a more complete list.

  • 500W Power Output with Single Strong 12V Rail The Rosewill SilentNight-500 power supply delivers rated 500W of safe, reliable output for your computer systems. One single strong +12V rail with 4x 6+2-Pin PCIe connectors can juice up your high-end CPU and even multiple graphics cards.
  •  Fanless Design Instead of traditional active fan cooling, the Rosewill SilentNight-500 adopts an 0dBA fanless design letting you operate your PC in a complete zero-noise environment. A great number of venting holes on walls and large heatsink on cover ensure effective and efficient heat dissipation.
  •  80 PLUS Platinum Certified The 80 PLUS Platinum certified power supply provides ultra-high power efficiency of 91% at 20% load, 92% at 50% load, 90% at 100% load, saving your money on your electrical bill, reducing heat in your computer’s system and prolonging its life.
  •  Modular Design With fixed 1x 20+4-pin main connector, 1x 12V 4+4-pin connector and 2x 6+2-pin PCI-e connectors, the modular design allows use of only the cable you need for
  •  Superior Components All Capacitor are made in Japan with higher stability and longer lasting.
  •  Comprehensive Protection An array of protection measures such as OVP, OPP and SCP provide maximum safety to your critical system components.

Single rails are not better than properly done multiple rails. Fanless is pretty awesome, if it works. We’ll see. For 0dBA (silence!) it’ll need to be free of whines and clicks and such too. 80+ Platinum is great. Modular is great, too. Japanese capacitors? Great! Comprehensive Protection? Also great. I’ll probably check SCP on this one too, just for giggles. Below are the specs, my thoughts are in italic text.

Model

Brand
Rosewill
Model
SilentNight-500

Spec

Type
ATX12V / EPS12V
Maximum Power
500W
Fans
Fanless Power Supply
PFC
Active
Main Connector
20+4Pin
+12V Rails
Single
PCI-Express Connector
4 x 6+2-Pin   Nice to see four 6+2 cables, that’s above average for this wattage range.
SATA Power Connector
6
SLI
SLI Ready  With four PCIe cables, one hopes it can do SLI.
CrossFire
CrossFire Ready   One hopes for CrossFire support, too.
Modular
Modular  I like modular.
Efficiency
>89%, up to 94%
Energy-Efficient
80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified
Over Voltage Protection
Yes
Input Voltage
115 – 240 V  115 is an awfully high minimum voltage, especially when ATX spec says 90v. I think they’re just talking wall plug style, not actual voltage.
Input Frequency Range
50/60 Hz
Input Current
10A  This is…. wrong. that’d be 1150 W to 2400 W input power. No way.
Output
+3.3V@20A, +5V@20A, +12V@41.5A, -12V@0.5A, +5VSB@2.5A  Amps! Volts! Yay!
Approvals
cTUVus / TUV / CB / CE / FCC / CCC / C-Tick / BSMI
Dimensions
170 x 150 x 86mm

Features

Connectors
Fixed Cables:
1 x Main connector (20+4pin)
1 x 12V 8pin (4+4pin)
1 x 2PCI-E 6+2Pin Cable
This is a good selection of hardwired cables. Rosewill did it right.
Modular Cables:
1 x 4SATA Connector Cable
1 x 2SATA + 2Molex Connector Cable
1 x 3Molex + 1Floppy Connector Cable
1 x 2PCI-E 6+2Pin Cable
Features
Supports all Intel and AMD multi-core and its compatible Motherboards, ATX/BTX compliant.  English skills are deteriorating here.
Fit in with EuP (Energy-using Products) instructions / U.S.A Energy Star standards: energy consumption during shut off status less than 1WSupport nVIDIA (SLI)/ATI, high rank & high efficiency graphic card. Hopefully they don’t smell rank.
PCI-E power plugs are setup in a 6+2 configuration for the latest graphic cards and compatible with every brand.
Passed 80 PLUS Platinum Certification, on 20% 50% 100% loading, with 91% 92% 90% Transform Efficiency.
Extend Output Capacitance are used for higher stability and longer lasting.(All Capacitor and Capacitance are made in Japan with higher stability and longer lasting)  All capacitance is made in Japan! That’s like saying “All voltage is made in Japan!” I’m not sure whether it’s hilarious or depressing. Japanese caps are nice at least.Multiple Protection Design : OVP,OPP,SCP   SCP I’ll probably test. OVP I can’t test, OPP I don’t believe in testing, other that many PSUs use OPP to claim SCP.Switches can use for more then 2000 times.All series are made of RoHS unleaded green material.   Yay? How green? How’d they make black paint out of green material, anyway?Multiple safety certificates acquired.

Manufacturer Warranty

Parts
5 years limited
Labor
5 years limited

I don’t know whether to blame Rosewill or Newegg for the dubious English skills. Someone has them, though. Ideally that just means that the time and effort went into the PSU rather than marketing. I’d be OK with that.

Photos Part One: The Box

Front of The Box

Front of The Box

Back of The Box

Back of The Box

The Box Opens!

The Box Opens!

Much like the Tachyon 1000 W unit I reviewed, the box is a simple affair. I like it. Also similar is the foam packaging inside the box, I like that too. Rosewill is doing it right with the packaging here in my opinion, inside and out. Pretty short section, this.

Photos Part Two: The PSU

Top of the Silent Night 500 W

Top of the Silent Night 500 W

Bottom

Bottom

One Side

One Side

"Exhaust" End

“Exhaust” End

Here’s where things take a turn for the snazzy. Instead of a fan on top we have a massive heatsink! Also lots of ventilation holes. Do be aware that when I say “top” I mean it, putting this PSU in upside down could be a rather serious error. I don’t think I’d use it in cases with a top mount PSU either, unless you have strongly positive or negative airflow set up, or the entire top of the case is mesh and you mount the PSU heatink-up. While it doesn’t need a fan, it does require airflow. It should be able to generate enough convectively if there is room for the air to go somewhere, hence the top of a case not being a real great place. I’ll be rather rude to it in TEUW during testing, we’ll see how it does.

The output end of things gets it’s own selection of pictures.

The Output End

The Output End

Upside Down Silicone Cap is Upside Down

Upside Down Silicone Cap is Upside Down

The Outputs Uncapped

The Outputs Uncapped

Someone in the factory put one silicone modular plug cap on upside down, which I find amusing. It’s so far from being an issue as to almost be unmentionable. I mention it because, as I said, I find it amusing. The plugs look the same as the Tachyon’s plugs, a quick comparison between the two shows them to even be wired the same way. Despite this I don’t recommend mixing and matching cables between PSUs. In this case it would probably work, in other cases it can destroy the PSU and anything plugged into it. This happened recently on the forums.

A few angled shots:

Pretty nice looking. I’m a fan of crackle-black as well as of large heatsinks.

Photos Part Three: Cables

We’ll start with the hardwired jobs.

ATX24P Connector, It's 20+4P

ATX24P Connector, It’s 20+4P

CPU Power Connector: 4+4P

CPU Power Connector: 4+4P

Two 6+2P PCIe Plugs, Dubious Layout

Two 6+2P PCIe Plugs, Dubious Layout

The sleeving starts well back from the end of the cable on the cables with split connectors, this makes it easier to get everything lined up right. It also makes it not look as good. The PCIe cables are somewhat dubiously done, functional enough, but kind of ugly. Onward to the modular cables and accessories!

The Modular Cables

The Modular Cables

The Accessories

The Accessories

For modular cables we get another PCIe cable with two 6+2P plugs, also with somewhat dubious +2P bits. Again totally functional, but not pretty. We also get a Molex cable with three Molex plugs and a FDD plug, a SATA cable with four SATA plugs, and a combo cable with two SATA plugs and two Molex plugs. I like the selection. We also get some cable ties, a power cord (don’t laugh, not all units come with one), four thumbscrews and four normal screws. I like that you get thumbscrews and normal screws, it’s a nice touch.

Testing Part One: Regulation Testing

A decent load test of a PSU requires a decent load. Contrary to what some may believe, that means you need a known load that can fully stress the PSU. Computer hardware does not cut it. Worse, if the PSU fails during testing it might take out the computer hardware anyway. Commercial load testers cost a lot of money. I do not have a lot of money, so I built my own with juicy power resistors and a Toyota cylinder head. It works great. I’ll be using it to load this thing down fairly severely and will check voltages and ripple (more on that later) at various points. The down side to my tester is that the loads it can put on PSUs are fairly coarse, they go in increments of 48 W for 12 V, 50 W for 5 V and 22 W for 3.3V. Those wattages assume the PSU is putting out exactly the official rail voltage, a PSU putting out 12.24 V rather than 12 V will be at 49.9 W per step rather than 48 W. I file that under the “tough beans” category as I figure if a percent or two of load makes that much of a difference, the PSU manufacturer should have hit the voltage regulation more squarely. It does make calculating efficiency difficult at best.  However, given that the input power is read via a Kill-a-Watt, the efficiency numbers are dubious to begin with. Kill-a-Watts are not known for extreme accuracy on things with automatic power factor correction. For this reason, I am not listing the efficiency.

The ATX spec says that voltage regulation must be within 5% of the rail’s official designation, regardless of load. It doesn’t actually mention that the PSU shouldn’t explode, though I expect they figured it was implied. Exploding is a failure in my book regardless.

It is also worth knowing that I will be testing this PSU at both outdoor ambient temperatures (typically between 10 °C and 20 °C here this time of year) as well as in the Enclosure of Unreasonable Warmth. TEUW is a precision engineered enclosure that I use to route the exhaust air from the PSU right back into the intake fan, it is adjustable to hold the intake air temperature at (almost) any level I want it. This way I can test the PSU’s response to hot conditions as well as cold conditions. For the hot testing I will be running the intake temp as close to the unit’s maximum rated temperature as possible. TEUW, in case you’re curious, is a cardboard box.

Unlike usual, the first temperature number is the heatsink on the top of the unit. The second temperature is just outside the exhaust grill. Due to the fan-less, efficient, nature of this unit I wasn’t able to get it as hot as I’d have liked to, nor was I able to get it as hot or track the temperatures as well as I’d have liked due to the large delta between air temps at the top of TEUW and at the bottom where the probe was.

Wattages (total) 12 V Rail 5 V Rail 3.3 V Rail Kill-A-Watts Temps
0/0/0w (0w) 12.20 5.16 3.38 5.2  14/14
96/50/22w (168w)  12.19  5.09  3.33  187  13/11
192/50/22w (264w)  12.15  5.09  3.33  291  14/13
288/50/44w (382w)  12.15  5.09  3.27  421  17/17
384/50/44w (478w)  12.15  5.09  3.27  529  22/12
480/0/0w (480w)  12.15  5.15  3.37  530  21/12
HIGH AMBIENT TEST RESULTS BELOW
384/50/44w (478w)  12.15  5.09  3.33  532  41/30
480/0/0w (480w)  12.15  5.16  3.38  531  42/32

It really is silent. No whines, no squeals, no fan, nothing. Impressive. 12 V regulation was 0.4%, excellent. 5 V regulation was 1.3%, which is good. 3.3 V regulation was 1.5% which is also good. All told that’s 1.09% regulation, just shy of the 1% “AWESOME!” number, but very good indeed. The heatsink on the roof stayed a fairly consistent 10-12 degrees hotter than the air going in the exhaust grill, once I isolated it from the world’s breezes. I don’t think this unit would have any issues in a fan-less case, as long as the case is open enough for convective air movement.

Last, this unit does have functional SCP, though it appears to take the form of tripping the OPP sensing bits as it takes a bit (I’d guess 50-100 ms) to kick in. It works though, which is nice.

Testing Part Two: Ripple Testing

Ripple is fluctuation of the PSU’s output voltage caused by a variety of factors. It is pretty much impossible to have zero ripple in a SMPS computer power supply because of how a SMPS works, so the question is how much ripple is there? In the regulation testing phase we found out how the PSU does at keeping the average voltage at a set level, now we’re going to see what that voltage is doing on really short time frames. The ATX spec says that the 12 V rail cannot have more than 120 mV peak to peak ripple, the 5 V and 3.3 V rails need to stay under 50 mV.

If that isn’t complicated enough for you, there are three forms of ripple to keep track of as well. Long-term ripple from the PSU’s controller adjusting the output voltage and over/undershooting, correcting, overshooting, etc. Medium-term ripple from the voltage controller charging and discharging the inductor(s) and capacitor(s) that make up the VRM, and very short-term ripple caused by the switching itself. The first and second forms are the most important, if they are out of spec it can cause instability at best or damage in extreme situations. The very short-term (I call it transient ripple) flavor is less crucial, excessive amounts can still cause issues though it takes more of it to do so. The ATX spec does not differentiate, as far as the spec goes 121 mV of transient ripple is just as much of a failure as 121 mV of medium or long term ripple.

I test ripple in a few difference ways, first I test it during the cold load testing. It is tested at zero load and maximum load first. During the hot load testing I test the ripple at maximum load again. I have recently started testing ripple at fairly random loads with the unit still hot, it’s a bit unorthodox (a bit? maybe a lot) but has found issues in the past that did not show up with other test methods.

First up, cold zero load ripple. Scope is at 5 ms / 10 mV, except for 3.3 V which is at 5 µs / 10 mV to show the transient spikes. 5V has ‘em too.

12 V Ripple, Cold, 5ms/10mV, ~7mV Ripple.

12 V Ripple at Zero load, Cold, 5ms/10mV, ~7mV Ripple.

5 V Ripple at Zero Load, Cold, 5ms/10mV, ~12mV Ripple.

5 V Ripple at Zero Load, Cold, 5ms/10mV, ~12mV Ripple.

3.3 V Ripple at Zero Load, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~18mV Ripple.

3.3 V Ripple at Zero Load, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~18mV Ripple.

Nice looking, especially 12 V. The spike in 3.3 V and 5 V isn’t an issue as it’s still well within spec. Where it’s coming from I don’t know. APFC switches come to mind.

Next up, full unit load cold. Scope at 5ms / 10mV for 12 V and 5µs / 10mV for 5 V and 3.3 V.

12 V Ripple at Full Load, Cold, 5ms/10mV, ~42mV Ripple.

12 V Ripple at Full Load, Cold, 5ms/10mV, ~42mV Ripple.

5 V Ripple at Full Load, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~30mV Ripple.

5 V Ripple at Full Load, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~30mV Ripple.

3.3 V Ripple at Full Load, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~28mV Ripple.

3.3 V Ripple at Full Load, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~28mV Ripple.

At full load the ripple levels are still well within spec. Right about 33% of maximum for 12 V, while 5 V and 3.3 V are a bit over 50% maximum due to the transients. The transients are about 400 ns long, it looks like a MOSFET or diode switching spike. In any case, these are good results.

Next up, a hefty 12 V crossload, still cold ambients, scope is at 5µs/10mV for all shots.

12 V Ripple w/12V Crossload, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~36mV Ripple

12 V Ripple w/12V Crossload, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~36mV Ripple

5 V Ripple w/12V Crossload, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~26mV Ripple

5 V Ripple w/12V Crossload, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~26mV Ripple

3.3 V Ripple w/12V Crossload, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~30mV Ripple

3.3 V Ripple w/12V Crossload, Cold, 5µs/10mV, ~30mV Ripple

The same spike shows up here, without it the 5 V and 3.3 V ripple would be glorious. With it, it’s still better than average. 12 V looks great.

Next up full unit load at high temperatures, scope is still at 5µs/10mV for all shots.

12 V Ripple at Full Load, Hot, 5µs/10mV, ~42mV Ripple

12 V Ripple at Full Load, Hot, 5µs/10mV, ~42mV Ripple

5 V Ripple at Full Load, Hot, 5µs/10mV, ~26mV Ripple

5 V Ripple at Full Load, Hot, 5µs/10mV, ~26mV Ripple

12 V Ripple at Full Load, Hot, 5µs/10mV, ~32mV Ripple

12 V Ripple at Full Load, Hot, 5µs/10mV, ~32mV Ripple

New shapes, pretty much the same ripple levels. It likes it hot for the most part, that’s good as it’ll be at least warm without airflow. I’m pretty impressed really. The hot crossload results were unremarkable enough that I’m not going to waste everybody’s time with them.

Dissection

Disclaimer: Power supplies can have dangerous voltages inside them even after being unplugged, DO NOT OPEN POWER SUPPLIES. It’s just not a good idea. Opening a power supply and poking around inside could very well kill you. Don’t try this at home. Don’t try this at work. Just don’t do it.

This PSU has quite a few more screws than normal, the sides are their own plate of sheet metal, plus of course there’s the big heatsink on top. Amusingly I suspect you could get it apart without killing the warranty sticker, though I don’t recommend it.

The bottom of the heatsink is a simple plate, connected to the primary and secondary heatsinks with a thick thermal pad, the main transformer has an aluminum block on top of it with a pad to the heatsink as well. Under the PCB are more thermal pads connecting the PCB to the case.

Bottom of the Heatsink

Bottom of the Heatsink

Overview, Complete With Pads

Overview, Complete With Pads

Thermal Pads On The Bottom Of The Case

Thermal Pads On The Bottom Of The Case

Sideways Cap is Sideways. Connected Though

Sideways Cap is Sideways. Connected Though

Lots of thermal pads around here!  Why that cap isn’t upright I don’t know, it could be. It’s not hurting anything being tipped over though. The wet looking marks are silicone oil squeezed out of the thermal pads. Not an issue. Slimy, though.

The transient filter is all on the PCB for a change:

Transient Filter

Transient Filter

Nice complete one too from the filter end of things, two inductors, four Y caps, 3 X caps and a fuse. No MOV or TVS Diode, be sure to use a surge protector!

Overview of the APFC Bits

Overview of the APFC Bits

The Rectifier

The Rectifier (Heatsink Removed)

The APFC Switch

The APFC Switch

The APFC Diode

The APFC Diode

The rectifier is a US30K80R (30 A, 800 V), APFC switching is controlled by a 1653A inside an EMI shield and lots of yellow plastic tape. The single switch is a 5R140P (23A@25ºc, 15A@100ºc, 550 V), while the diode is a CREE C3D10060 (10 A, 600 V). Nothing out of the ordinary here, though these are top line parts. The inductor is an interesting design. The capacitor got a heatshrink wrap for some reason, it’s a Nippon Chemi-Con 400 V 470 µF unit. Also note the thermistor and relay for inrush protection. Nice to see.
The primary switches are a pair of 5R199P (17A@25ºc, 11A@100ºc, 550 V) MOSFETs.

One of Two Primary Switches

One of Two Primary Switches

One of Four Secondary Rectification MOSFETs, and a Heat Movement Thingie

One of Four Secondary Rectification MOSFETs, and a Heat Movement Thingie

On the secondary side we have four 023N04N (90 A, 40 V) MOSFETs for rectification. There are also a couple plates that take heat from the heatsink and drag it into the PCB, where the pads on the bottom of the PCB can take it to the case to be disposed of.

PWM duties as well as protections happen inside a custom SuperFlower SF29601 IC, nobody knows anything about what actually exists inside it. The 5 V and 3.3 V rails are generated on a PCB just past the secondary heatsink, it has another heatsink bolted to it from the secondary heatsink side. As such, I can’t get any information off it at all. The output wires of the PSU are protected from the Evil Noisy MOSFETs by an EMI shield inside yellow plastic wrap.

Protections and PWM IC

Protections and PWM IC

Secondary Side Overviewish

Secondary Side Overviewish

Secondary Side Overview and EMI Shield

Secondary Side Overview and EMI Shield

All capacitors throughout the unit (electrolytic and polymer) are Nippon Chemi-Con. Top notch!

The modular output board is a tiny little thing, it has a few more filter caps on it.

Front of the Modular Output Board

Front of the Modular Output Board

Rear of the Modular Output Board

Rear of the Modular Output Board

Main PCB Soldering

Main PCB Soldering

The soldering on both PCBs is excellent, though there are a few leads that are longer than I’d like. The person in charge of trimming leads (what a job) must have been behind or something. In any case, no issues here.

Nowhere can I find a temperature sensor, leading me to the conclusion that there is no over-temp protection on this unit. That seems like a dubious idea to me.

Final Thoughts and Conclusion

I’ve been wanting to get my hands on a fan-less unit since I first saw them. Now that I’ve finally acquired one, I have to say I’m impressed with it. SuperFlower and Rosewill have done an excellent job here.

The cables have all the connectors a 500 W unit should have, including four PCIe 6+2 plugs rather than the more standard two. The PCIe +2P bits aren’t as smoothly done as they could be though.

The unit really is silent. I heard absolutely nothing out of it while running. At startup the relay that shorts the inrush protection thermistor clicks once, but that’s it.

As usual with SuperFlower units there isn’t a MOV or TVS Diode for surge protection. I don’t agree with this. Similarly lacking is a UL number anywhere on the unit. The lack of UL listing isn’t a problem though.

Regulation and ripple control are very good. No problems there.

It runs very cool given any airflow at all, and takes a very long time to heat up even inside a sealed box. I see no issue running this in a fan-less or low fan case, as long as there is room for convective airflow. The lack of OTP makes it important to be sure you aren’t setting the PSU up inside a sealed box.

Price wise, this is tied for the most expensive fan-less unit, with another SuperFlower built unit. This is the only unit with four 6+2P PCIe cables however. The other unit at $160 has two 6P and two 6+2P, while the less expensive units only have two 6+2P in total. I’ll call it a “good” value.

To summarize, there are pros:

  • Fan-less. It really is silent.
  • Lots of PCIe 6+2P connectors, good cable selection in general too.
  • Very efficient.
  • Looks pretty awesome.
  • Very good ripple control and regulation.
  • Soldering is good though.

There are a few cons:

  • A few leads are longer than I’d like.
  • PCIe +2P cable bits aren’t very pretty.
  • No OTP means a bit of care in placement is a good idea.

All told this is an easy Approved stamp to give out. If you need a totally silent PSU, this is a unit very worthy of consideration.

–Ed Smith / Bobnova

 

 

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

14 Comments:

Bobnova's Avatar
Silence is, as I've mentioned before, an absolute.
As far as I can tell, this thing is silent.
Woomack's Avatar
Nice review
Good to see that someone is making fanless 80+ platinum psus ... I wish to see it in 1kW version
Bobnova's Avatar
Well... The tachyon doesn't run the fan till around 1kW if you're in a cold ambient. Does that count?
givmedew's Avatar
Quote Bobnova:

"Last, this unit does have functional SCP, though it appears to take the form of tripping the OPP sensing bits as it takes a bit (Id guess 50-100 ms) to kick in. It works though, which is nice."

Could you elaborate what all this means? I don't know what SCP is and what you are talking about tripping the OPP what is all this stuff and what does it do?
fornoob's Avatar
Nice review as usual

I didn't see the lack of surge protection in the cons
wagex's Avatar
troll caps are trolls lol





im diggin it, would be nice in my htpc get that 850w xion turd out of there
Bobnova's Avatar
You should be using a surge protector anyway, really.
My feelings on the matter vary daily, hence so does whether it lands in the cons

SCP is Short Circuit Protection, OPP is Over Power Protection.
Generally speaking SCP is part of OCP (Over Current Protection). First some definitions:

OPP: Over Power Protection, monitors the amount of power being drawn from the wall and shuts down if it is too high.

OCP: Over Current Protection, monitors a given rail (12v, 5v, 3.3v, or 12v1, 12v2, 12v3, 12v4, 5v, 3.3v for a PSU with four 12V rails.), shuts down if more current is drawn over that rail than is acceptable.

SCP: Short Circuit Protection. Watches for short circuits on a given rail, the easiest way to do this is just wait for the short circuit to trip the OCP of that rail. It can be done other ways as well. Under Voltage Protection for example.

A unit like the Tachyon which has an 80+ amp 12V rail it takes a very short circuit to trip OCP on the 12V rail, and just as short of a circuit to draw more than the allowed amount of power from the wall. As a result I was able to do some arc welding with it. Given a large enough single rail the 12V wires will melt before SCP/OCP/OPP trips, not useful.

A unit like the Silent Night has a much easier time of it. If I short the unit out and it shuts down instantly I feel that it is safe to assume it's SCP directly. If it takes a little bit longer, it's probably rail OCP or UVP. OCP measurements take a bit of time to make, likewise it takes a bit of time to drain the 12V filter caps to the point where UVP kicks in.
If it takes longer still I feel that the odds are it was OPP, to trip OPP you need to first drain the 12V caps enough that the regulation bits kick the voltage back up (drawing more current from the APFC bits and storage cap) and then drain the APFC cap enough that the APFC kicks things up a notch and draws more from the wall.
This doesn't exactly take a long time, but it takes more time than if the 12V bits shut things down.
I was able to get a nice violet sustained arc for 50-100ms on this unit before it shut down. The Tachyon I got one for closer to 300-400ms before there wasn't enough metal left to make a connection.
Woomack's Avatar
I think I'm fine with PC P&C 1.2kW for now
djscrew's Avatar
You should figure out a way to record the arcs so you can put them up for our viewing pleasure! :P

I don't buy this at all, it just shows the ineptitude of Rosewill. It seems that SuperFlower has made them a nice PSU though! Rosewill is Chinese, and I must say that imho, it's rather amusing to see these Chinese companies flounder about when it comes to the professional appearance of their product.

Did anyone notice the Papyrus font used for the product name!?? I think there is a power point presentation at my middle school somewhere on dinosaurs that I did with that font. It certainly gave me some good amusement seeing that and then seeing that the actual electrical numbers are wrong on the box as well as the jacked marketing. The PSU is made totally of green material (depending on what color light is being cast on it) so that's awesome.
Bobnova's Avatar
Hard to say, it was copied off Neweg as Rosewill didn't list them in the first place!

The ten amp number surprised me. Someone didn't even try on that one.
woboy's Avatar
This seems an ideal power supply for a SFF case with good airflow.
Silly comment on my part is many SFF cases are very tight internally.
The Power Supply lists 170mm in length.
Using the modular plugs what would be an estimate of the total internal length needed to "fit" the psu>
Or is this too case specific for a good answer?
Anyway, enjoyed the review.
Rosewill is listed as "based in City of Industry, California" with Shanghai and Taiwan offices. Is it now Chinese owned annd operated?
And is the "Chinese Company" in the article intended to indicate Mainland China or Taiwan? Or just primarily Chinese mainland produced products?
Bobnova's Avatar
I have no idea what was being attempted with the Chinese bit. Last time I checked Rosewill was Newegg's house brand, Newegg is based in City of Industry, CA.

I'll measure the PSU and plugs and get back to you later today.
woboy's Avatar
Apologies. I "read" Rosewill is Chinese Company, but it is not in your article.
Another brain fade by self.
Will try to check comments before posting in future.
(now finding where that came from will nag me)
Bobnova's Avatar
lol, it happens to everybody. Don't worry about it
Leave a Comment