Samsung Readies the 860 PRO and 860 EVO for Launch

Add Your Comments

Samsung has added two new consumer-grade drives to its extensive storage line-up this week. The 860 PRO and 860 EVO.

Both drives are based on Samsung’s 64-layer V-NAND technology with the 860 PRO using 2-bit per cell MLC and the EVO using 3-bit per cell MLC. Samsung has added their updated MJX controller and LPDDR4 for faster communication between the host system and the NAND flash modules.

The 860 PRO will be the higher end of the two models and offers up to 560/530 MB/s sequential read and write speeds with max random read and write speeds of 100K/90K IOPS. The PRO is available in sizes ranging from 256GB to 4TB in a 2.5″ SATA III form factor and features varying sizes of LPDDR4 roughly in step with drive capacity up to 4GB for the 4TB model. The PRO also carries a 5-year warranty or up to 4,800 TBW (Terabytes Written).

The 860 EVO offers an expanded product line compared to the PRO. It has the same availability in the 2.5″ form factor but has added M.2 SATA models from 250GB up to 2TB and mSATA models from 250GB up to 1TB. The lineup features sequential read and write speeds up to 550/520MB/s and max random read and write speeds of 98K/90K IOPS. The EVO also includes LPDDR4 DRAM buffers as the PRO version does and carries a 5-year warranty but a reduced TBW of 2,400.

The 860 PRO and 860 EVO SSDs are available from this month with manufacturer’s suggested retail prices starting at $139.99 and $94.99 USD, respectively.

Shawn Jennings – Johan45

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. I never for a moment thought otherwise. I read your contributions on the front page a lot, and the story on the 860 Samsungs was at your usual level of excellence. :thup:
    From Samsung's product page specs on the 860 EVO, 500 GB.

    While that does double the 850 EVO's coverage, it's nowhere close to 4800 TBW, or even 2400 TBW. The 860 Pro shows the same 300 TBW. All that aside, doubling the warrany makes the $30 seem like an understandable price hike. LOL
    Thank you for the article. When I saw prices on the 850 series start to drop I wondered if it meant a new product was on the way. (Or maybe that is just coincidental.)

    It will be interesting to see benchmarks on the newer drives. It seems to me that the peak throughput is more or less limited by the SATA bandwidth. I wonder if there will be significant improvements in other measures such as random read/write performance that may more closely match typical usage patterns.

    I also note that the lifetime endurance of these drives is double the 850 series which seems like a good thing for those that need it. Last time I looked at mine I projected over 20 years until I hit the expected endurance limit. I could replace them with drives that would last half a century! :D Or some other mechanism related to aging would cause them to not last that long. (I would be well into my second teens if I lasted another half century. ;) )