Posts Tagged: 140 mm

Thermaltake Riing 14 Premium Fans Review

The Thermaltake Riing 14 LED RGB TT Premium Edition 3-Fan Pack is an eyeful to see. These fans offer ring shaped LED’s in 256 colors. The kit was designed for radiators. We will look at these fans as fans. We will also look at the software that gives us those 256 colors, as well as controlling the fan
speed. Read More

Silverstone FQ141 & FW141 140 mm Fans Review

Silverstone makes a number of fans. They have done so for years, and their designs are always interesting. Silverstone sent a number of fans for review. Today we will look at the 140 mm fans. One is voltage controlled. The others are PWM, with great flexibility. How well do these three models do their jobs? Let’s see. Read More

Thermalright TY-14x SQ Fans Review

Thermalright has finally put their PWM fans in square frames. Long known for their excellent 140 mm PWM heatsink fans, Thermalright finally have those fans ready for radiators. Enthusiasts have admired those blade shapes for years, but they never fit cases or rads, only heatsinks. The TY series has now expanded to include square frames, so they can be placed on 140 mm radiators. With PWM control, they can plug into PWM splitters where they get their power directly from PSU’s to avoid overburdening the motherboard, and still letting you control your fans without needing a separate fan controller. Thermalright sent pairs of these to review, so let’s look at these fans. Read More

NZXT FX140 V2 and FZ140 Fans Review

NZXT seems to be on a roll recently. They have cases which are whimsical and stolid, take your pick. They have a variety of accessories. They have a line of AIO coolers (one was reviewed on our frontpage). Additionally they have put out a number of fascinating fans. We will review two kinds of fan here – PWM (for rads) and case fans. What we find out should be interesting. Read More

Cryorig R1 Ultimate Heatsink Review

Cryorig has an “ultimate” heatsink for us: the Cryorig R1 Ultimate. This heatsink is full of advanced technology, and it uses two 140 x 25 mm fans and tandem fin-stack towers. Ultimate, indeed. But does all of this give us the ultimate in cooling experience? Only one way to find out. We will explore the heck out of this heatsink. Read More

Thermalright TY-143 and TY-147A 140 mm Fan Review

Today we will be looking at two of Thermalright’s 140 mm PWM fans, the TY-143 and the TY-147A. If you have been following 140 mm fans at all, you know that Thermalright’s TY series of PWM fans are said to be among the best. Are They? Thermalright has sent us a pair of each to evaluate. Let us see. Read More

Reeven Ouranos Heatsink Review

Reeven seems to be making quite a splash. They are offering arrange of fans, a range of heatsinks and a range of cases to us enthusiasts. In this review we will look at Reeven’s Ouranos, which is Greek for ‘the heavens’ or ‘celestial.’ Does this heatsink provide ‘celestial’ cooling? Let us investigate. Read More

Noctua NH-C14S Review

Not all cases have room for a full tower heatsink. So, Noctua provides a blow-down variety with six heat pipes and a 140 mm fan. That was the NH-C14, and it is quite a cooler. So, what’s new? The NH-C14S (note the change in the model number), with the finstack moved over to make room for cards in the top PCIE slot. How well does this heatsink cool? Let’s find out. Read More

Nanoxia Deep Silence 4 Case Review

Fresh from looking at Nanoxia’s largest case, we will now look at their smallest. The Deep Silence 4 is a four-slot case compact case that is designed to fit a mATX motherboard. Nanoxia clearly took pains to retain their sound deadening design and other valuable features; they worked to keep noise in while sweated to keep the cost out. Did they succeed? Let’s see. Read More

Phanteks Enthoo Primo Full Tower Case Review

Phanteks was founded in 2007. Their first product was a heatsink that was arguably the best heatsink when it was introduced. Since then we have seen more fans and more heatsinks from Phanteks. And now they jump into the world of cases. Just as they did with the PH-TC14PE, Phanteks is starting at the top end of the market, this time with the Enthoo Primo, a $250 case. Is this case worth that price? Let us find out. Read More