AMD Ryzen 2700X and 2600X Sneak Peek

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Today we get a sneak peek of what is coming next Thursday. I can’t let the whole cat out of the bag yet but I can let you see its whiskers. All joking aside, there is a Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) in place until April 19th for actual performance numbers and benchmarks but AMD is letting us show off their new hardware prior to the actual review. I have the AMD Ryzen+ review kit here and will give a quick rundown of its contents and some of the specifications and features of the upcoming Ryzen+, the all-new X470 motherboards and G.Skill DDR4 which have been included in the kit.

First up though are some glamour shots of the kit and its contents.

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In the kit I received, AMD has included the second generation Ryzen CPUs, two X470 motherboards and some new DDR4 from G.skill which is geared for the AM4 platform. The CPUs included are the Ryzen 7 2700X with its Wraith Prism CPU cooler and the Ryzen 5 2600X which is bundled with the Wraith Spire CPU cooler.  This was very unexpected, but AMD also included two motherboards in the kit, the X470 Gaming M7 AC from MSI as well as the X470 Aorus Gaming 7 WiFi from Gigabyte. Also included, was a 2×8 GB, dual channel set of the new SniperX memory from G.Skill which has been tested for AM4 compatibility and runs at 3400 MHz, Cl16.

AMD RYZEN 2700X and 2600X

Currently, we are not at liberty to divulge a lot of information regarding the upcoming CPU launch but do have a few pictures of them and their coolers. I’ve also put together a quick specifications table outlining some of the important aspects of the new CPUs. I can say that the new second generation Ryzen CPUs are still compatible with the previously released 300-series chipset motherboards as well as motherboards with the new 400-series chipsets.

You’ll also notice there are fewer SKUs for this launch with only the 2700 and 2600 series CPUs. The 4-core variants launched about a month ago in the form of the 2400G and 2200G APUs. These are the replacements for the series of CPUs ranging from the Ryzen 3 1200 up to the Ryzen 5 1500X. To date, there’s no word or indication of a Ryzen 7 2800X release, at least not to our knowledge.

The second generation Ryzen brings with it updated versions of the Precision Boost and XFR. The new Precision Boost 2.0 was covered in the APU review in February and XFR 2.0 will be covered in the review next week. In short, Precision Boost 2.0 leverages more cores during the boost stage to increase the performance. This is all dependant on temperature, power, and CPU limitations but I did see much higher “all core” boost levels with the APUs.

Below is a table of the Ryzen+ CPU line specifications.

AMD Ryzen+ CPU Specifications

Ryzen 7 2700X Ryzen 7 2700 Ryzen 5 2600X Ryzen 5 2600
MSRP USD $329 USD $299 USD $229 USD $199
Silicon 12 nm “Pinnacle Ridge”
Socket AM4
Cores/Threads 8-core/16-thread 6-core/12-thread
Clock Speed 3.70 GHz 3.20 GHz 3.60 GHz 3.40 GHz
Boost Speed 4.35 GHz 4.10 GHz 4.25 GHz 3.90 GHz
Cooler Wraith Prism Wraith Spire Wraith Spire Wraith Stealth
L2 Cache 512 KB per core
L3 Cache 16 MB shared
Unlocked Yes
New Features XFR 2.0 and Precision Boost 2.0
TDP 105 W 65 W 95 W 65 W
Memory Dual-Channel DDR4-2933 JEDEC up to 64 GB
PCIe PCIe Gen 3.0 x16 PEG (x16 or x8 + x8) + x4 M.2 + x4 Chipset
SoC Connectivity 2xSATA 6 Gbps, 4x USB 3.1, 1xM.2- PCIe 32 Gbps
Chipset AMD 300 and 400 Series

Here’s a few pictures of the upcoming CPUs, packaging and coolers.

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X470 Motherboards

I’ll start this off with AM4 chipset specifications which are handled best with a nice and neat table below. As a note, the majority of the new features require an AMD 2000 series CPU.

 Chipset X470 X370 B450 B350 B320
USB 2.0 6 6 6 6 6
USB 3.0 (5 Gbps) 6 6 2 2 2
USB 3.1 (10 Gbps) 2 2 2 2 1
SATA 3.0 4 4 2 2 2
SATAe/PCIe Gen3 2 2 1 1 1
PCIe Gen2 8 8 6 6 4
CPU PCIe Interface 1×16/2×8 1×16/2×8 1×16 1×16 1×16
Overclocking Yes Yes Yes Yes No
XFR 2.0 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
XFR 2.0 Enhanced Yes No Yes No No
Precision Boost Overdrive Yes No Yes No No

Gigabyte X470 AORUS GAMING 7 WIFI

The Aorus Gaming 7 appears to have a 12-phase power delivery system with an 8-pin and 4-pin EPS 12v power connections for the CPU. They have also included an onboard power switch but it’s located on the rear I/O panel next to the clear CMOS button which is a first for me.

Additional specifications below.

  • Socket AM4
  • AMD Ryzen Processors
  • AMD 470 Chipset
  • DDR4 Dual Channel, 4 DIMMs
  • 1 PCIe 3.0 x16 + 1 PCIe 3.0 x8
  • 1 PCIe 2.0 x4 + 2 PCIe 2.0 x1
  • 6 SATA 3, 2 M.2 for SSD
  • 2 USB 3.1 Type-C, 1 USB 3.1 Type-A, 10 USB 3.0 and 6 USB 2.0
  • Intel GbE Lan, Intel 2×2 AC Wireless
  • Realtek ALC1220-VB
  • ATX Form Factor 305mm x 244mm

All Images below can be viewed full size by right clicking and opening in a new tab.

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MSI X470 GAMING M7 AC

There’s a couple of additions to the MSI worth mentioning here. They have included a BIOS Flashback function, onboard power and reset buttons, and the familiar “Game Boost” knob. There’s also what appears to be a 14-phase power delivery system with 2 x 8-pin auxiliary power connectors.

Additional specifications below.

  • Socket AM4
  • AMD Ryzen Processors
  • AMD 470 Chipset
  • DDR4 Dual Channel, 4 DIMMs
  • 2 PCIe 3.0 x16
  • 1 PCIe 2.0 x16 + 3 PCIe 2.0 x1
  • 6 SATA 3, 2 M.2 for SSD
  • 2 USB 3.1 Type-C, 1 USB 3.1 Type-A, 8 USB 3.0 and 6 USB 2.0
  • Killer E2500 Gigabit LAN, Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 8265, Bluetooth 4.2
  • 8-channel Audio Boost 4 Technology
  • ATX Form Factor

All Images below can be viewed full size by right clicking and opening in a new tab.

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G.Skill SniperX DDR4

The G.Skill SniperX line of DDR4 is a fairly recent addition which premiered in January this year. It features speeds ranging from 2400 MHz up to 3600 MHz and judging by the sticker on this package some of them are compatible with the AM4 platform. The RAM below is a 2 x 8 GB, dual channel kit rated for 3400 MHz with 16-16-16-36 timings at 1.35 V using the XMP profile. It’s pretty sharp looking RAM with a black body and black/grey/white camouflage theme on the top bar. These aren’t available in RGB LED models.

All Images below can be viewed full size by right clicking and opening in a new tab.

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There you have it, AMD has given me quite an arsenal of new equipment to test the second generation Ryzen CPUs with. This review kit just arrived Wednesday evening so time will be tight just testing the CPUs. I would like to be able to test both motherboards as well but to do that thoroughly will be difficult with a deadline less than a week away.

So, it’s back to work for me and make sure you tune in here Thursday, April 19th at 9:00 a.m. sharp for the official unveiling of the second generation AMD Ryzen CPUs!

Shawn Jennings – Johan45

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Discussion
  1. Newegg sent out a pre-order link in their latest email ad. Any word on the limitiations when running a 2700x on an x370 mobo? Don't recall seeing that info around.
    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
    There's a chart in the article which gives most of the info regarding x370 VS x470. Some of the new features work but some don't. Like precision boost overdrive only works with 2xxx and x470
    Think I saw somewhere the updated turbo system needs the new chipset for full effect. Only applies for stock, doesn't matter if you manually OC anyway.
    Given my tech burnout I'm now thinking of holding off before ordering... no launch day madness for me. See what OCs people really get before I decide if I even bother at all.
    Looks like there is barely any difference between X370 and X470. Check the table, XFR 2.0 Enchanced/Precision Boost Overdrive is enabled in X470 but I think ( can be wrong ) it won't matter much while manual overclocking.
    I think there was something about more PCIe lanes in X470 some time ago but I can't see it in any new articles.
    Soon we will see review so for sure there will be something about it there.
    Johan45
    There's a chart in the article which gives most of the info regarding x370 VS x470. Some of the new features work but some don't. Like precision boost overdrive only works with 2xxx and x470
    Literally just saw that
    Skimmed the words and skipped the images/charts.
    The 2700x is mighty tempting, depending if the lack of precision boost makes a small difference. Was thinking about getting an 1800x and running it @ stock a few months back instead of overclocking my 1700.
    Does your review have some x370 testing results included into the mix?
    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
    Do we know yet if the new Ryzens will be more compatible with a variety of high speed RAM rather than needing the Samsung "B" like the first generation?
    trents
    Do we know yet if the new Ryzens will be more compatible with a variety of high speed RAM rather than needing the Samsung "B" like the first generation?

    Just to provide fresh news ... if motherboard has good BIOS then 1st gen of Ryzens will run at high clock and won't need Samsung B for that. I was already testing new memory kits based on Hynix IC up to 3866 on ASRock X370 but if we talk about stability then there can be problems on any IC at 3600 or higher memory clock.
    I'd like to see the game results with maxed out OC. I doubt there will be an increase, but if some of these boards get to the RAM speeds they claim they do... maybe. But most likely little.
    Max is 4000 on X370 but I couldn't make any board to boot at 4000, not sure what is on X470 but I guess there are some issues with early AGESA so I don't expect high results in first weeks.
    Little off-topic but right now I'm testing 1920X+ASRock X399M Taichi. So far 4x16GB in quad channel runs at 3466 and seems stable. 3600 has stability issues. I will check with 4x8GB kit later this weekend.
    Johan45
    No testing was allowed to be printed Trents. That info will come next week

    Not sure what you mean to say here, Shawn. Other kinds of performance testing of the new Ryzens has been leaking out for several weeks now.
    There are internal agreements and you just have to stick to these rules if you want to work with brands like AMD in the future. Most leaks were from distribution afaik. On the other hand I don't know if there weren't any "controlled" leaks in some countries.
    There are 3-4 leaks in the web and all are reposted on many other websites.
    trents
    Not sure what you mean to say here, Shawn. Other kinds of performance testing of the new Ryzens has been leaking out for several weeks now.
    NDA = Non Disclosure Agreement (see first paragraph of the article). We have to sign these things so we get the samples early. If we breach these contracts, we get put on the naughty list and do not get sent more samples. This is how it works.
    We don't leak. We stick to the rules. ;)
    Okay, so let me rephrase the question. Do any of the "leaks" give evidence of more compatibility with a range of high speed memory ICs?
    AFIK Trents all the "leaks" were on X370 motherboards and memory seemed in line with what we had seen to date. Many Ryzen as Woomack said are capable of 3600 MHz for memory but above that it's a crap shoot and no stability
    Johan45
    AFIK Trents all the "leaks" were on X370 motherboards and memory seemed in line with what we had seen to date. Many Ryzen as Woomack said are capable of 3600 MHz for memory but above that it's a crap shoot and no stability
    Unless you buy gskill aegis 3000 ram and are running an Asus Prime x370-pro. It doesn't like booting with most settings above 2133, but I haven't had the time to tinker with it and try and get back to 2933 or 3000. Moral of the story is cheap ram is cheap ram. O.o
    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk