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View Full Version : how to control psu fan speed?


delta107
10-17-06, 09:17 AM
I don't like hearing that psu fan, so is there a way lowering its speed? Thanks

billb
10-17-06, 12:05 PM
I don't like hearing that psu fan, so is there a way lowering its speed? ThanksIt would help to know your system specs, or atleast, what psu it is.

You could run it on 7 volts. You could add a rehostat. If your MOBO has fan control you could plug it in there. But any of these options will probably cause it to overheat and fail, possibly taking your MOBO, CPU, graphics card(s), hard drive(s) and anything else connected to the power supply with it.

delta107
10-18-06, 08:20 AM
It would help to know your system specs, or atleast, what psu it is.

You could run it on 7 volts. You could add a rehostat. If your MOBO has fan control you could plug it in there. But any of these options will probably cause it to overheat and fail, possibly taking your MOBO, CPU, graphics card(s), hard drive(s) and anything else connected to the power supply with it.
I have my specs in my signature
From what I heard psu does not have components that are sensible to heat. The fan was added to provide better cooling to the processor. But I would like to know how I'm supposed to lower the psu fan speed. 3-4 V is enough I think

Evilsizer
10-18-06, 08:40 AM
if you know how....
take psu apart and simply replace the fan with a sleeve bearing fan or slower speed BB fan.

billb
10-18-06, 10:19 AM
From what I heard psu does not have components that are sensible to heat. Then what do you think makes then fail? ALL electronic components are affected by heat. And, no, the fans are not put in PSU's to add case cooling. Disconnect the fan in a PSU and I'd give it about 10 minutes to live.

jmh547
10-18-06, 10:53 AM
10 minutes? that generous!

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16817153019
This would be quieter but it is only 350watts.

delta107
10-18-06, 02:49 PM
Then what do you think makes then fail? ALL electronic components are affected by heat. And, no, the fans are not put in PSU's to add case cooling. Disconnect the fan in a PSU and I'd give it about 10 minutes to live.

Ok, I agree, but the PSU fan is an important cooling factor. For older machines using older, slower CPUs, additional cooling wasn't important, since psu had the only fan in the system. So psu is also a factor in the cooling process.

darkcow
10-18-06, 03:40 PM
not anymore. a high wattage psu needs a cooling fan otherwise it will expload.


your like... 5 years in the past my friend.

i would suggest a new PSU to combat the sound issue.

Evilsizer
10-18-06, 04:47 PM
ok so hot air does what,rise. psu in 90% of case are at the top. what does wasted energy do..since you are taking 120v and stepping it down to 12/5/3.3v. the extra voltage is wasted as heat from the regulators in the psu. you need to make sure that when loaded the max operational temp of the regulators is not exceeded.

Bios24
10-18-06, 10:42 PM
To get back on topic..... There is likely no way to control the speed/noise of the fan in your PSU. It's likely hard-wired in the PSU and maybe temp sensitive at best. (Some models do have external fan controllers though, like mine :D ) Only thing you can do is swap it for a different fan. Most use an 80mm exhaust fan and possibly a 92/120mm fan on the bottom. You can replace it with most any fan you like, or add a controller to the stock fan.

Note: Replacing PSU fans can be dangerous and will void your warranty! With that said I've done this many times with no problems, just be careful about what you're doing. There is also a slight chance of the PSU overheating if you're pushing it to the limits with a low-CFM fan. I've never ran into this problem though. (And some of my PSU fans are much slower than stock)