• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

10/100 SWITCH better than a 10/100 HUB?

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

Lord_Zoltan

Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2002
Location
Canada, EH?
5 port 10/100 autosensing autouplink switch be better than a 5 port 10/100 hub.
I just want something to share my cable interent with 3 computers and to play games on through the house.
Will the switch be able to have an uplink like the hub where i can just plug my cable modem cat 5 cable into it and all 3 computers share the internet?

Will it be better or slower or whateveR?

Thanks

Zoltan
 

David

Forums Super Moderator
Joined
Feb 20, 2001
A switch will work faster than a hub, and is better. When a computer sends a signal which reaches a hub, the hub then sends the same signal to all connected computers. Switched hubs only send it to relevant computers.
 

JoT

You can't fire me, I have
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Lord_Zoltan said:
Will the switch be able to have an uplink like the hub where i can just plug my cable modem cat 5 cable into it and all 3 computers share the internet?

It would only work like that if you have enough IP addresses from your ISP, in this case: 3. It would not make your internet faster in any way. I very very strongly doubt that you would see a difference in the network speed in day-to-day activity.
 

evolver

Registered
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Location
Sydney, Australia
i had tried to do that with my switch aswell ....dint work for me i had to setup a server pc with minial specs then a straight network cable from server to the switch

Cable Modem
|--Cat5
|----|---Server
|----|-----|----RJ45
|----|-----|------|-----Switch/Hub
|----|-----|------|-------|----RJ45
|----|-----|------|-------|-----|----Network Computers


if you want the cable modem to plug directly into the swicth/hub .... you will most probably need to get a router .... thast what i ended up doing because my server comp died :(
 

SevenSixTwo

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2002
Location
not here anymore thats for sure
And the real explanation why a switch is better:

On a hub everyone shares that 100mbps. If you have 4 computers talking to each other in pairs, all at the same time, each pair will roughly have 50mbps available to them. On a switch you can possibly have full 100mbps links between more than just 1 pair of ports.
 

mtnbikerjerry

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Location
Aliso Viejo, California
SevenSixTwo said:
And the real explanation why a switch is better:

On a hub everyone shares that 100mbps. If you have 4 computers talking to each other in pairs, all at the same time, each pair will roughly have 50mbps available to them. On a switch you can possibly have full 100mbps links between more than just 1 pair of ports.


Not necessarily true. All computer can have up to theoritically 100Mb/sec on a Hub that is rated for 100Mb/sec. but the limitation is the collisions of frames when many machines or hubs staggered are hooked up to the same hub and are transmitting frames at the same time. That can slow down network performance, thus causing congestion.

A switch prevents collisions to some degree by forwarding the correct frames to the right interface, via a MAC Address table. Less collisions on a network equals better network performance "higher bandwidth"

Inside a switch ASICs or application specific integrated circuits make the MAC address destination by learning the SOURCE MAC address and building it into the address table, then it Learns the Desitination after the Switch broadcasts out of all interface ports until a reply is recieved from correct destination computer. Swtich can filter, decide where to send the frames to. If the swtich does not know, it forwards out all interfaces except to the interface in which it recieved the frame.

A hub is just simply a signal repeater and can easily pass on frame data from each machine connected to it, to a switch that can learn the source addresses and map the comptuer MAC addresses in the switchs own table.

A switch prevents a high number of collisions by providing each port it's own "collision domain"

When it comes to broadcasting domains, that would be provided by a router or a Layer 3 switch.

J
CCNP
 
Last edited:

mtnbikerjerry

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Location
Aliso Viejo, California
SevenSixTwo said:
Don't tell us everything you know now ;)


I prefer not to be a know it all, but I do take a passion in networking.

I forsee the potential future of networking. 10G will make a big impact on how computing is done at home. It will be cool.

Right now, it is just the basics of ethernet.

I want to spread passion for networking as much as possible.

After all it is the way information has to move.

If you relate with just common knowledge that a switch is faster versus a hub, it may work for a sales pitch. That may not be the case for actual connectivity.

But knowing why is understandably cool for techies and important just in case you have to design a network at a company or at home for those not knowledgable in the subject.
 
Last edited: