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-10 C and it sounds like a train...

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ghostarmor

New Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2001
Well I applied arctic silver, attached a 120mm intake on front, 120mm out on top, 80mm in on side, and 80mm out of back (plus my ps fan is out). It is loud as hell, and it only gave me a 10 C degree difference. Now I'm at 50 C (processor) and 25 C motherboard (this was a 5 C difference). Is it really worth it, because I still cant get over 900 mhz which is what it was like before. I have a 750 mhz tbird on an asus a7v133. If I only run my 80mm, it is quiet, but this raises it back up 5 C for both. I think I'd rather run quieter and five degrees hotter, even if the computer lives half a year less. Although I did have fun playing with my computer, quieter is just my preference for this situation, since I'm not overclocking better anyway. Anyone else have an opinion?
 

CoopertownBob

Registered
Joined
Mar 5, 2001
Lap and reseat the HS. The proc is running way to hot for such a low board temp. Use plenty of grease, the HS will flatten it out thin enough.

Turn that fa non the back around to blow into the case. You want over pressure, not under. How is the clutter in the case? IDE cables rolled?

What kind of HSF do you have anyway?
 

Metaxas

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2000
I disagree dude. Using too much thermal grease, has just as detramental effects on the transfer of heat, as not enough grease does, or a poorly seated HSF, or just an underpowered one. 50c is pretty toasty...man, i'd cringe if I saw my temps that high........ :)
 

SharkyTM

Member
Joined
Mar 9, 2001
Location
Ithaca, NY
metaxas is right... use grease sparingly... too much will either 1 short out the leads as it shirts out from under the H or 2 detrimentally affect cooling... lap that baby... i used 600, 800, then 1500, then a rag with Bon-Ami... my HS looked like an actual mirror... took two days to do it, but ... check the profile :)

Shark
 

DennisC

Registered
Joined
Jan 12, 2001
Lapping refers to the art of gently sanding the contact surfaces of your heatsink and/or chip to make them as flat as possible and minimize the air gaps in the thermal interface. A very thin coat of thermal paste is then all you need for an efficient transfer of heat from the chip to the sink.

The numbers are different grits of sandpaper, with the bigger numbers being finer grits.
 

Mr B

Senior Admin Emeritus
Joined
Dec 28, 2000
Location
East Bridgewater, MA
CoopertownBob (Mar 29, 2001 04:31 p.m.):
Lap and reseat the HS. The proc is running way to hot for such a low board temp. Use plenty of grease, the HS will flatten it out thin enough.

Turn that fa non the back around to blow into the case. You want over pressure, not under. How is the clutter in the case? IDE cables rolled?

What kind of HSF do you have anyway?

I'd leave the fans the way they are. You actually want more exhaust fans (out) than intake fans.

You can pump air into the case, but if you can't get it out as fast or faster, that air is just going to heat up and raise the air temp inside the case.

An anology I've used here before is comparing the PC to a car...let's call it a Camaro, 'cuz I'm a Chevy boy, and they usually get overclocked a lot....

Take your stock Chevy engine, and replace the low rise aluminum intake/Rochester QuadraJet 4 barrel carburetor with a high rise Edelbrock tunnel ram, with dual quad 850 CFM Holley doublepumpers. Gonna go like a bat out of hell now, right?

Nope... not until you replace the cheezy 2 1/2 inch exaust that GM put on the car. Backpressure is the key here. While you've dramatically increased the air/fuel intake, the exaust isn't getting the spent gases out of the engine fast enough. Case cooling works on a similar principle.

If you have a case fan on the front and back, BOTH blowing IN, that's just going to create a lot of turbulence, and disrupt a smooth air flow inside the box. You want to keep the air moving in one direction, with as few obstructions as possible. This is why the "rounded" ribbon cables sell so well.

If your local library subscribes to this, "MaximumPC" magazine had an excellent article on case cooling tips and techniques in their Nov. 2000 issue. Try to find a copy, as it sheds a lot of light on what works and what doesn't.

Mr B
 

Nagorak

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Guys, I disagree extremely about the use hardly any thermal grease line of thinking. The idea is to have grease between the processor and the heatsink instead of air! Putting not enough grease and you're likely to end up having airpockets where there is no grease. By putting too much grease I fail to see how there could be any detrimental effect.

That aside, I'd suggest redoing your case fan setup. Order only QUIET fans, the larger the better and the fewer the better. It's really very easy to go overboard on case ventillation and end up with a noisy behemoth. There is a law of diminishing returns with everything, and it especially applies to case cooling. For half the noise you can cool almost just as well, and you'll be happy to be able to sit in the same room with your computer. You're other option is to build a small cement bunker to house your computer in to drown out the noise.