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400F too much for thermal paste?

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Korndog

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Location
California
Hey guys,
i guess this isn't about cpu cooling, but I need to cool down something that will usually run at 400F or around 200c. I have a bunch of different types of thermal pastes, even some diamond paste. do you guys know if any paste can withstand that much heat for a long period of time w/o separating?
 

=ACID RAIN=

Member
Joined
May 19, 2003
Location
Kingwood, TX
This a new one to me...lol.

Try putting several drops of each one in a pan and put it in the oven @400F. See which ones hold up.
 

nd4spdbh2

Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2005
Location
Camarillo, CA!
Hey guys,
i guess this isn't about cpu cooling, but I need to cool down something that will usually run at 400F or around 200c. I have a bunch of different types of thermal pastes, even some diamond paste. do you guys know if any paste can withstand that much heat for a long period of time w/o separating?

might try emailing Arctic Silver and other TIM manufactures.
 

Ben333

Folding for Team 32!
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
There should be thermal specs on the tube of TIM or in the manual.
 

Diddyu

Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2007
Arctic Alumina
Extended temperature limits: – 40°C to >180°C

Just curious, what ARE you cooling?
 

gsrcrxsi

Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Location
Baltimore, MD
check nasa page on shuttle tiles thiers a lot of good info ... no bs

nasa shuttle tiles act as insulators, not conductors, and take temps in excess of 3000 degrees. not really applicable here. not to mention the ablative materials they use the protect the TILES themselves from evaporating.

+1 for what are you cooling?
 
OP
Korndog

Korndog

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Location
California
i made a plastic extruder (melts polyethylene and forms it into a shape) that uses a long screw and heating element to compress/melt the plastic. Works great for a short time, but then the heat travels back into the plastic hopper bin and melts the stuff in the bin..
so i need to cool down that end. I have plenty of different types of epoxies and silicone stuff that can stand high temp. and they work great, but I need to be able to remove heat so it has to be a thermal conductor
 

gsrcrxsi

Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2008
Location
Baltimore, MD
have you tried just pointing a big fan at the hopper? or maybe thermally insulating the hopper from the heat source so that it doesnt get as hot?
 

Neuromancer

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Location
Tau'ri
With that much heat I think just bolting (or better yet soldering) some aluminum fins to the part you need to cool would be plenty.


If you are talking about using it between your item and the fins... okay.. .wont get to 400F. The fins will start shedding the heat long before it gets there... (as long as you have enough and any air movement at all)

Just hoping you realize that the tim itself is not going to cool anyting...
 
OP
Korndog

Korndog

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2002
Location
California
thats what i'm hoping for, but i just want to be precautions. this thing is going to run continuously, for days at a time, so insulating doesn't help. Sorry, it's not reallly in the hopper, but the prehopper stage. this is where it's hot enough to get all the plastic pellets to stick together, but not hot enough to travel down the extruder screw so it just clogs the whole thing.