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5 MB hdd

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Mr.Scott

Beamed Me Up!
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Would have been hard to explain to the wife that I have to build an addition on the garage for my raid array.
 

caddi daddi

Godzilla to ant hills
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
we carry around 16 gig flash drives in our pockets that cost 10 bucks and have no idea how we got here!!!!
 

dyckah

Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2005
we carry around 16 gig flash drives in our pockets that cost 10 bucks and have no idea how we got here!!!!

16 gig flash drives are my small ones!
have many 32 gig flash drives as well, and they hardly cost more than 10 bucks!
 
OP
DocClock aka MadClocker

DocClock aka MadClocker

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
Stockton Cal, USA, Earth
I always have a pocket full of movies with me on my 32gb cruzer....the only one I carry anymore...now they have 256gb thumb drives..we sure have come a long way.
I remember a computer shop here in Stockton that used a 10 mb hdd to prop open the door...it was about two feet around, and about 9 inches thick.
I think it had two platters..I wish I would have taken a pic when the shop was still open.
 

ShrimpBrime

~MadHatDeLidder~
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Back in my grandfathers days lol.

Got a 5 foot tall, two foot wide PC case at gramps house actually. It's stripped of PC parts, and is used for storing our impact and pneumatic tools and such!

Cool post!
 

magellan

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2002
One of my old bosses told me about the days they didn't have any hard drives or even floppy disk drives -- your data and program were encoded on punch cards that had to be fed into a punch card reader in the exact order in which they were encoded. Your computer output came out on a high-speed dot matrix printers. You had to schedule time to run your program in advance and you might not even know if your program had bugs until the next day. There were no video output devices whatsoever and no such things as video games existed. For the programmer who dropped their stack of punched cards they had to play a game of 52 pick-up to get it back into the right order again.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
I use to work in a government center for the military, I had a classified security clearance, they were still using punch cards, reel-to-reel tape, also IBM's 3370 uses seven 14-inch platters to store 571MB, the first drive to use thin-film heads.
 

magellan

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2002
I use to work in a government center for the military, I had a classified security clearance, they were still using punch cards, reel-to-reel tape, also IBM's 3370 uses seven 14-inch platters to store 571MB, the first drive to use thin-film heads.

I once saw a late model UNIVAC kinda like this one

http://www.cs.unc.edu/~yakowenk/classiccmp/univac/Univac9200b.jpg

The control panel on the front let you manually twiddle the bits on the registers. Why you want to do that I'll never know.

At my 1st job in IT, pretty much everything of importance was on an IBM mainframe, I remember a huge tree trunk of cables (probably as big around as a giant redwood tree) left
the IBM mainframe cold room. I think it was because every 3270 terminal and printer had been, at some point, directly connected to the mainframe until they had some sort of terminal servers interposed.
 

Leito

Registered
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Location
Poland
I was born in 1994, so times of those drives are for me imposible to imagine. But I am not looking so far in the past - my first PC was a laptop - Toshiba Sattelite Pro 4600 with Pentium 750Mhz, 386Mb of RAM and 40gb hard drive. It was something like a 8 years ago? Those specs weren't any good even in those times, but still on a 40gb hard drive i had everything I needed and also i didn't have any trash and unneeded things, which i do now. Every single file which was not important for me was deleted, but today? My phone has better specs and I have in it 32gb sd card :D Even my first smartphone - Xperia U - which I had 4 years ago? It had Dual Core 800Mhz CPU and 512mb of RAM :D. I still have my first MP3 player with 1gb of memory. It was also good, because each song, which I had on it was damn good! But today? I don't have a time to select it and I put all folders and then I click 15 times "next" just to listen 1 song, and after it ends again 15 times "next" :D

Computer hardware is getting old so fast...:salute:
 

Mr.Scott

Beamed Me Up!
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
I don't have a time to select it and I put all folders and then I click 15 times "next" just to listen 1 song, and after it ends again 15 times "next"

Wow. The real Leito Shuffle. :D
 

GenericSauron

Registered
Joined
Feb 27, 2016
I was born in 1994, so times of those drives are for me imposible to imagine. But I am not looking so far in the past - my first PC was a laptop - Toshiba Sattelite Pro 4600 with Pentium 750Mhz, 386Mb of RAM and 40gb hard drive. It was something like a 8 years ago? Those specs weren't any good even in those times, but still on a 40gb hard drive i had everything I needed and also i didn't have any trash and unneeded things, which i do now. Every single file which was not important for me was deleted, but today? My phone has better specs and I have in it 32gb sd card :D Even my first smartphone - Xperia U - which I had 4 years ago? It had Dual Core 800Mhz CPU and 512mb of RAM :D. I still have my first MP3 player with 1gb of memory. It was also good, because each song, which I had on it was damn good! But today? I don't have a time to select it and I put all folders and then I click 15 times "next" just to listen 1 song, and after it ends again 15 times "next" :D

Computer hardware is getting old so fast...:salute:

I had a Pentium 66MHz as a hand-me-down lol. I was born in 1989.