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6 GPU Folding Rig Build

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OP
torin3

torin3

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2004
Ok, so given the cards and cables work, and other MBs with x8 speed connections work, and Ubuntu is nomally faster.

Either this MB specifically is the issue, or I've screwed up something in Ubuntu.

If nobody has any other suggestions, I'm going to swich back to the old MB I was using and try it with Ubuntu with just 2 x16 slots. If that works, I'll know it wasn't the OS install.

Then I'll try the x8 slots (runnng 3 or more cards) on the old MB and see if it works that way.
 

unsafesteagle

Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2014
Location
Waterville, Maine
I remember these issues with amd socket am3 boards, both with [email protected] and if I remember correct solo mining litecoin also.
Possibly the specs in the user manual of the motherboard explain the layout of the pcie slots?
Post magically merged:

I remember these issues with amd socket am3 boards, both with [email protected] and if I remember correct solo mining litecoin also.
Possibly the specs in the user manual of the motherboard explain the layout of the pcie slots?
Or a more recent topic is pcie bifurcation, where the motherboard is able to detect and operate at different lane amounts and pcie generation
 
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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
More or less...Bifurcation just splits faster lanes into multiple slower ones. Some motherboards have more flexibility than others, it depends on how they are wired electrically.

But mobos already are able to detect and operate at different lane amounts and PCIe gens without bifurcation. I don't check on all boards, but many have the option to adjust the generation of the PCIe slot and # of lanes (both lower), while others can also bifurcate to create more lanes from one. Those are two distinctly different functions, I believe.
 
OP
torin3

torin3

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2004
Ok, I've switched to the old MB, running Ubuntu, and already the PPD is nearly double.

I'll look up the MB manual and see how the slots work and try out x8 speeds and see if there is a slow-down. if not, I guess it was a MB issue.

I'm also potentially wondering if it might be the x8 to x16 adapters. Fortunately, I can easily test those.
 
OP
torin3

torin3

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2004
Aaannndd.... somehow FAHControl wouldn't connect anymore. Trying to fix that (the ubutntu install guide from folding forum still fails for me for intalling the python3 verison of FAHControl) it somehow made the whole install unstable. Blowing it away and starting from scratch.
 

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Ubuntu 22.04 ships with Python 3.10.0, so it 'shouldn't' be necessary to add, to make FAHControl work. When I get another machine put together I'll be running a test box for Linux folding, in various distros(Debian, Fedora, Arch) and try to boil it down to a simple punch list.
 
OP
torin3

torin3

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2004
Ubuntu 22.04 ships with Python 3.10.0, so it 'shouldn't' be necessary to add, to make FAHControl work. When I get another machine put together I'll be running a test box for Linux folding, in various distros(Debian, Fedora, Arch) and try to boil it down to a simple punch list.

Yes, it comes with Python 3, but the FAHControl download from Stanford requires Python 2, so you either need to install Python 2, or use the FAHControl test build for Python 3 from here: https://github.com/cdberkstresser/fah-control/releases

The thing that actually worked for me was going into Ubuntu Software and searching for FAHControl and installing the verison there. I'm going to try that directly without doing the Stanford installs.
 

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Yes, it comes with Python 3, but the FAHControl download from Stanford requires Python 2, so you either need to install Python 2, or use the FAHControl test build for Python 3 from here: https://github.com/cdberkstresser/fah-control/releases

The thing that actually worked for me was going into Ubuntu Software and searching for FAHControl and installing the verison there. I'm going to try that directly without doing the Stanford installs.

It's a bit of a mystery, I would think that a given newer version[python] would be backwards compatible, and work for applications that called for earlier versions. Apparently that isn't the case.

Edit: That's interesting, I just searched Synaptic and FAHControl & FAHclient are available, same version as Stanford's download.
 
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OP
torin3

torin3

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2004
Well, it was much easier going through the internal Ubuntu software install. Though for some reason X wasn't loading right after Ubuntu started the first time, and I had to terminal login and launch X. After that, it was fine.

New3070.jpg New1080.jpg

So, about 1.3M PPD than it was doing on the same hardware with no riser cables on Win10.

And according to the MB manual, when both the PCI-E slots they are in are in use, they should be at x8 speeds. It is supposed to have 2 x16 dedicated slots that I'm not currently using, and the other two are either x16/x0 or x8/x8.

I tried the x8 to x16 physical adpater and the card wouldn't register. So possibly those adapters were the basis for my problem with the MB. I'll try some experimentation down the road to see if that might be the case.
 

WhitehawkEQ

Premium Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
This is why I use Windows, 1 install file for FAHControl, FAHClient and FAHViewer and 1 install file for video, not 1 million different files (ok not that many but you get the point). With Linux you have 6 or more things to install like FAHControl, FAHClient, FAHViewer, python 3, cuda, X and video drivers.
I'll just add on more cards to get more points :rofl: :chair:
 

harlam357

Senior Fold-a-holic
Joined
Sep 22, 2004
I concur Hawk. Of course, all my machines have a purpose other than folding. If I were building a dedicated folder like torin is, I'd likely go through the Linux pain to get that extra 10-15%.

I'm mean, I like Linux, on the server. I run server workloads there all day. WSL on Windows is sweet. But for a daily driver, I'll stick with the ease of Windows.
 

ihrsetrdr

Señor Senior Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
High Desert, Calif.
Now that I've got it down, I can do it from scratch in about 20-40 minutes.
One of the main 'attractions' to Linux for me, simplicity and speed. If the complete system blows up(figuratively or literally) I can be back in business on different hardware or new install within the hour. Updates? Just a minute, maybe two if upgrading a lot of packages. ;)
 
OP
torin3

torin3

Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2004
Well, the motherboard I'm currently using in the garage is an Asus Maximus IV Extreme-Z. It has 4 x16 physical slots.

Connections are as follows

1 is x16/x8,
2 is x16
3 is x8
4 ix x16

You can use 1 at x16, or 1 and 3 at x8 each
You can also use 2 and 4 at x16 each.

But if you use more, you can get 1, 2, and 4 at x16, but if you do, 3 won't work at all.

So I'm limited to 3 cards in it right now.

Debating on how I want to upgrade.