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75% of Linux code now written by paid developers

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dropadrop

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2001
Location
Finland
It's great that this probably results in quality code, but it also pushes development efforts even further towards what corporations look for in Linux (servers). No offence, but desktop on Linux still has a long way to go, and from a kernel point of view what works and scales on a huge server might not be optimal for a mobile phone, media player or low power desktop computer.

I do see this as a positive thing, just for me it would mean more to improve the desktop experience.
 

Aynjell

Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2008
It's great that this probably results in quality code, but it also pushes development efforts even further towards what corporations look for in Linux (servers). No offence, but desktop on Linux still has a long way to go, and from a kernel point of view what works and scales on a huge server might not be optimal for a mobile phone, media player or low power desktop computer.

I do see this as a positive thing, just for me it would mean more to improve the desktop experience.

With the recent surge of linux based phones, this is obviously not an issue. Any phone marketed to be powerful enough to use linux, is probably powerful enough to need it to be taken advantage of. This is just the nature of hand-held devices.
 

UnseenMenace

UnseenModerator
Joined
Apr 23, 2001
As linux makes headway into enterprise I would expect enterprise companys and their employees to be involved in the process of developing their products and all levels possible
 

fasteroc

New Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2010
It's great that this probably results in quality code, but it also pushes development efforts even further towards what corporations look for in Linux (servers). No offence, but desktop on Linux still has a long way to go, and from a kernel point of view what works and scales on a huge server might not be optimal for a mobile phone, media player or low power desktop computer.

I do see this as a positive thing, just for me it would mean more to improve the desktop experience.

A long way to go from a kernel point of view? Could you explain your stance? Different distros and different kernel modules exist for optimization purposes unlike proprietary OS's where you are locked into the kernel the OS ships with. "corporate affiliation" does not mean "for servers" just think about how many of these contributions came from companies like Canonical. a ton of embedded devices run Linux due to the ability to make customizations so your logic just seems a bit off. Everything from lighting systems to routers and smartphones (Android anyone?) run linux including most low power desktops.

As a developer whom has worked on Windows BSD and Linux I can tell you when it comes to embedded devices Linux is my choice as it is just easier to make work with the hardware.

Outside of North America Linux has gained a huge market share, the reason adoption of Linux here has been slower is because a large group of people learned on Windows and have no reason or desire to learn something new. If they did the game companies etc. would follow.

I still use Windows and BSD as well as Linux for different things but Windows and BSD are mainly used in VM's now.
 

oakstave

Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2007
Location
Oregon
Interesting... I always assumed there was paid programmers doing the majority of the work. It didn't occur to me it would be controversial. I see it as positive, as long as open source is respected.
 
OP
Evilsizer

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
Interesting... I always assumed there was paid programmers doing the majority of the work. It didn't occur to me it would be controversial. I see it as positive, as long as open source is respected.

i dont think it was ment to be controversial. to me it seems to point that it is growing that "FREE" os is being paid to be worked on. if it is 75% now what was it 3-6months ago, 1yr ago,2 yrs ago? i saw working on something like the kernel should be left to good talent, paid or non-paid.
 

dropadrop

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2001
Location
Finland
A long way to go from a kernel point of view? Could you explain your stance?

From a mentality point of view. Just how long did it take us to get a scheduler that works well on the desktop with low power computers (just as an example).

Different distros and different kernel modules exist for optimization purposes unlike proprietary OS's where you are locked into the kernel the OS ships with. "corporate affiliation" does not mean "for servers" just think about how many of these contributions came from companies like Canonical. a ton of embedded devices run Linux due to the ability to make customizations so your logic just seems a bit off. Everything from lighting systems to routers and smartphones (Android anyone?) run linux including most low power desktops.

As a developer whom has worked on Windows BSD and Linux I can tell you when it comes to embedded devices Linux is my choice as it is just easier to make work with the hardware.

Outside of North America Linux has gained a huge market share, the reason adoption of Linux here has been slower is because a large group of people learned on Windows and have no reason or desire to learn something new. If they did the game companies etc. would follow.

I still use Windows and BSD as well as Linux for different things but Windows and BSD are mainly used in VM's now.

No need to get overly defensive. I'll still pick Linux over Windows for the desktop any day, it's just I feel that even in Ubuntu 9.10 the desktop was not quite "there yet" in regards to usability. It has a strong 90's klunky feel to it despite the big (evolutionary) progress which has happened in the last 3 years.

And yes, at home my file server, tv, navigator, router and htpc run linux, I find it to be extremely flexible and a great OS.