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Afraid of ESD!! No ground on my outlet

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kamran

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2013
Location
Sadly Iran :(
I'm building a PC for a friend.
I personally without the slightest thinking smash my GPU and everything inside the motherboard while touching the PCB and although I've only build a single pc ( had to replace HDD and GPU once, and other things) I never had a problem.
But this is my friend's and the PC is so expensive. I do have a antistatic wrist band
But... I have no ground... Just a 2 pin 220v outlet. So if I just connect the wrist to my unplugged case. Will it be safe? His father is a scary guy xD but not as scary as 1000$

I do have a power hub which has just a few capacitors and an MCU inside (So I don't think it's REALLY safe) but a power spike could even kill it. Am I overthinking?? Or should I find a way to ground myself properly
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I have never in my life built a PC with an anti-static anything. ESD, while a real issue, can easily be avoided with simple common sense (like don't wear socks and shuffle your arse over to the machine on carpet and the first thing you touch is a component).

Overthinking. Just use your head a little bit and all will be well.
 
OP
kamran

kamran

Member
Joined
Jul 9, 2013
Location
Sadly Iran :(
Good thanks ;) although I am stupid but I think I can handle that!

My floor is made out of wood so I'll be fine I guess
 

Leegit

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Location
Kansas
ESD is really not an issue when working with consumer grade products. The biggest thing is to discharge any static buildup before you touch your components. You can do this by touching metal before you begin (like the case).
 

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
ESD damage is not about grounding something, it's about making sure that things are at the same potential. Damage occurs when two items are at different potentials and there is a RAPID discharge between the two. (RAPID is key here).

Having an anti-static pad, with a static strap connected to the pad, and all work being done on the pad is the safest way to go.

However, most "complete" electronic items (graphics cards, power supply, motherboard, disk drives, etc.) are very resistant to ESD. The biggest risk is the CPU chip...it has no protection until it is inserted into the motherboard.

If you are cautious, you don't need to do this if you follow some common practices:

1. Before touching a component that's in the case, touch an exposed metal part of the case for a few seconds. This will equalize the potential between you and the case.
2. Before putting a component into the case, touch both the case and the component. This will equalize the potential between you, the case, and the component.
3. Always have one hand touching the metal case and the component when first installing.
4. Always disconnect AC power (unplug) before doing anything with the PC.
5. Don't wear clothing that attracts static electricity when working on a PC (sweaters, thick bushy socks, etc.) Heck, to be safe, I am barefoot when I work on a PC.

If you constantly get static electricity shocks when walking around your house, then you should get a wrist strap and pad as described above.

Hope this helps!
 

Leegit

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Location
Kansas
If you have static buildup, you are electrically charged, i.e. have a potential...?

EDIT: The computer components are all electrically neutral, zero potential, unless powered on.
 
Last edited:

JrClocker

AKA: JrMiyagi
Joined
Sep 25, 2015
If you have static buildup, you have a potential - yes.

Components can get a static buildup too...just by sitting on a desk. Or if you are holding onto them and you get a potential.

My company manufactures electronics - we deal with this all the time.
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
I just unplug the computer, press the start button to drain the capacitors, and wear surgical gloves if I'm feeling especially "pro". LOL. Never had a problem.