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AMD temperatures

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Cheng

Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2002
What is the temperature you should rely on - the probe one, or the onboard diode? Obviously the diode is hotter...

I see you guys quoting your temps, so what do you guys use / find believable?
 

rogerdugans

Linux challenged Senior, not that it stops me...
Joined
Dec 28, 2001
Location
Corner of No and Where
On-diode reads the temp inside the chip and is more accurate.
In-socket thermistors are under the cpu and do not always contact the back of the chip at all- even if they do, they still are not that accurate.

External sensors are only truly accurate if you modify a heatsink or water block so that the sensor can directly contact the core of the cpu through the sink/block material.

I have gotten to know where my systems run well and where they are unstable: relative changes ON A SINGLE PC are fairly accurate and can show problems quickly.

Comparing temps between any two systems- even if they both use exactly the same components- is not really accurate. Each can easily vary by at least 1 or 2 degrees.

So take any comparisons with a grain of salt IMnsHO ;)
 

Salmon Dream

Registered
Joined
Jun 26, 2002
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
IR1 said:
If your mobo and processor support on die temperature readings you should use that. Mobo socket diode is always lower.

IR1 is right. My buddy's XP 1800+ (100% stock) runs half load 39C, or says his MB. My XP 1600+ (still at burn stage) idles at 43C, but uses the on chip diode. Which one do you think is correct.