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AMD up to no good?

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fubulg6000

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2003
I just held in my hand a few minutes ago the pleasent looking intel p4. It has a sturdy shell to keep the actual processor from damaging. Why hasn't AMD done this? Time after time we hear people who have chipped their core because of the delicate exterior of the amd core. It is very, very, very, etc, etc, fragile. One simple knick of an hsf may lead to its demise. Of course, amd most likely choose not to use one simply because of the amount of heat produced by the itty bitty core. OMG, i can't think straight right now. I can't remember what else i was going to say. Bah, alcohol. Now this is going to gripes and moan. But anyways, is amd making small fragile cores on purpose?
 

Breadfan

Inactive Moderator
Joined
Jan 4, 2001
Location
Northern VA
fubulg6000 said:
But anyways, is amd making small fragile cores on purpose?

No...it's just the nature of A.) silicon chips and B.) the number of transistors. P4's have a higher transister count due to more cache (vs Pally's and Tbreds) and longer pipelines.

AMD is incorporating a IHS on the hammers, and most likely the Athlon 64's.

While there have been some chipping accidents, the vast majority of AMD chips will live long, healthy, unchipped lives.

As can be seen from the article on the front page regarding temps with and without the IHS on the P4, not having one saves us a few degrees.

I don't mind them, but at the same time, I don't need one. Anyway, if the brides on the A64 are under and IHS, it's just one more barrier to unlock the mult.
 
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fubulg6000

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2003
For profit! I'm sure a company can easily make an equation to estimate how many people, or companies, will damage cores when installing. Retailers dont accept damaged cores, and warrenties are voided. When one is broken, another is to be purchased.
 

Bender

Mysteriously Changing Senior
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
In Thelemac's Basement Eating the Chickens
fubulg6000 said:
For profit! I'm sure a company can easily make an equation to estimate how many people, or companies, will damage cores when installing. Retailers dont accept damaged cores, and warrenties are voided. When one is broken, another is to be purchased.

Actually AMD loses money because they do replace some chipped and damaged cores. A friend of mine just chipped his barton 2500 and AMD is sending him a 2600 because they ran out of 2500s.
 

bafbrian

Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Location
Atlanta, GA
I don't think they make them that way in a effort to get ppl to chip their cores, they are just way to fragile that is all.

But there A64 looks like the P4, from a top view, so I think chipped cores will become a thin of the past when that proc comes out.
 

Mr B

Senior Admin Emeritus
Joined
Dec 28, 2000
Location
East Bridgewater, MA
fubulg6000 said:
For profit! I'm sure a company can easily make an equation to estimate how many people, or companies, will damage cores when installing. Retailers dont accept damaged cores, and warrenties are voided. When one is broken, another is to be purchased.

Think about what your saying for a mnute...

Ok, let me play Devil's Advocate here...I'm AMD, going by your train of thought..

I'll build my CPU's w/o a heatspreader, so that consumers/OEM vendors will constantly chip or break the die.

What do I stand to gain from this?

Increased sales? How? If they break within the warranty period, I'm replacing it for free, and losing money.

If it breaks frequently, my product will acquire a reputation for being cheaply made of inferior materials, and I will lose return customers/business.

As my customer base has their CPU's die on them, and they shift to a different supplier/manufacturer (IE; intel), what do my profit margins look like then??

**

Ok.... The bulk of chipped cores comes from end users, either using the wrong heatsink on the product, or incorrectly installing the heatsink somehow. intel chips aren't "die chip free"... I have on a shelf near me a P///850E that died from a chipped core (not my doing, bought it dead).

A lot of the chipped T-Birds and Durons back when happened for a couple of reasons...one was the "Golden Orb" fad that had people twisting the damn HSF onto the CPU to lock it in place. Notorious chip killers, those Gorbs. Another reason a lot of chips snuffed it back then, was people using intel S370 HSF's on Athlons. The two chips sit a slightly different heights, with the AMD a trifle bit taller. The extra pressure on the socket retention clip, could chip the corner of the die if the HSF was tilted slightly off level when hooking it on the socket...

I've lost count of the number of T-Birds, Durons, and XP's I've had, and the multitude of times each chip has had the HSF on/off/on for one reason or another.... I've never *knocks on wood* chipped one yet. I never put that foolish Gorb on one (thank God I learned about that bad news before I tried it...), and never mounted an intel specific HSF on one either.

Might be luck, might be me being uber careful installing them, who knows, who cares. Chipped cores on AMD's products aren't very common (or as common as they were at one time).

B.
 
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fubulg6000

Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2003
Well, if AMD was strict on their warranty policy then what i said earlier would apply. But, people in here are saying that they do replace chipped cores--issue is thrown out. Oh well.... just food for thought. I just wish that they would help out us oem people. I hate not having a warranty longer than 30 days.