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anyone else having problems with the DD maze2 mounting?

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Malakai

New Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Location
Fl
Im prolly gonna get one on monday and wanted to know if anyone is having similar problems like Hoots when mounting the maze2. Thanks in advance!
-Malakai
 

SavageHenry

Registered
Joined
Aug 31, 2001
Location
Warner Robins, GA
It took me a few tries to get it mounted really well, and I ended up replacing the nylon mounting hardware with steel, but it wasn't really too difficult.
 

The Overclocker

Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2001
Location
Milton Keynes, UK
if you are having problems, or think you will be having problems i suggest you get a aluminum anodised shim.
i use a purple tweakmosnter shim and it works well. The main reason for using a shim it to even out the block, because the four hole hold down is more subseptable to being uneven. Also a properly made shim should be exactly the same height as the cpu die so you can increase the pressure on the cpu without worring.
 

juliendogg

Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Location
NC, USA
couldn't really get it tight enough with so i got some stiffer springs and nylon wing nuts and all is good, chillin at 33 load....
 

Tecumseh

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2002
Location
Ohio
juliendogg said:
couldn't really get it tight enough with so i got some stiffer springs and nylon wing nuts and all is good, chillin at 33 load....

Good, but I agree with the overclocker on the shim thing.
The non-conductive, anodized aluminum shim will increase
the spanning distance and pretty much force a squaring
with the die without exceeding the AMD recommeded
mounting pressue. Brute force is not the best solution.
 
OP
Malakai

Malakai

New Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Location
Fl
the overclocker, where did u get the shim u have. is it the perfect size? ive heard stories abiut people having a slightly bent shim and frying their chips cause of it
-Malakai
 

Krusty

Insane Overclocking Clown
Joined
Sep 17, 2001
Location
Orange County
I replaced the feet on my processor with JB weld to help with the mounting. Haven't had any problems so far and it is probably safer than a shim. It just takes more time to prepare.
 

Tecumseh

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2002
Location
Ohio
Krusty said:
I replaced the feet on my processor with JB weld to help with the mounting. Haven't had any problems so far and it is probably safer than a shim. It just takes more time to prepare.

Krusty, how did you get it all to come out even? The
idea to increase the spanning distance with a shim works
because the metal in hard. With JBWeld all you get is
goo, right?
 

Krusty

Insane Overclocking Clown
Joined
Sep 17, 2001
Location
Orange County
Tecumseh said:


Krusty, how did you get it all to come out even? The
idea to increase the spanning distance with a shim works
because the metal in hard. With JBWeld all you get is
goo, right?

It took a couple tries to get it down perfectly. I used a method someone else posted on the forums.

First, find yourself a nice smooth piece of glass, some WD-40, and some JB weld. Mix up a little JB weld and let it sit for several hours. IT takes like 5 hours to harden, so I waited until it was more of the texture of play-doh to start using it. I knew it was ready when I could scrape a trough in it and it wouldn't smooth out after several minutes.
I scraped off the feet and cleaned the surface of the cpu. I took 4 little balls of the JB weld, stuck them in the place of the feet and pressed on them just lightly enough to get them to start to stick on the cpu.
I then put a thin coat of wd-40 on the glass and placed the cpu face down on it and moved the cpu around a bit to keep the JB weld from sticking to the glass. This took a couple of tries because I started out just pressing down on it and the JB weld would stick to the glass no matter how much WD-40 I put on it. I applied enough pressure on the glass and cpu to be able to see clearly that the die of the cpu is also pressed closely against the glass. Just to be safe, I stayed in front of this for a little over an hour making sure the jb weld wouldn't stick to the glass and keeping it face down to prevent gravity from deforming the jb weld at all.
I then plucked the cpu off the glass, let it harden overnight, and cleaned off the wd-40 that was all over the cpu.

For the test to make sure you didn't make the feet too big, place a piece of paper on a piece of glass, press the cpu lightly on a stamp ink pad, and use teh cpu to make a stamp on the glass. If you can't see the whole die on there, it's time to scrape off the jb weld and try again.
 

ButcherUK

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2001
Location
York, UK
I used steel bolts and replacement springs, but if you're careful about tightening up the springs (work diagonally, no more than one turn at a time per bolt) then it's almost impossible to get it uneven. The springs will hold it level.
 

Tecumseh

Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2002
Location
Ohio
ButcherUK said:
I used steel bolts and replacement springs, but if you're careful about tightening up the springs (work diagonally, no more than one turn at a time per bolt) then it's almost impossible to get it uneven. The springs will hold it level.

I am beginning to wonder if that is true. The die is not
directly under the center of the Maze2, is it? Hoot tried
to get it perfect. He thinks there was still something wrong.

Look at the Innovatek WB mount. It forces the WB down
directly over the die. Excellent engineering.

With brute force I'm sure you could smash the WB down
on the die, but with a 24 LB max, it should be applied
directly over the die.

The shim is a more even-handed approach. :D
The JBWeld ball trick seems too:beer: