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Anyone Still "BURN IN" their cpu or is it just me??

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Overclocker456

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2002
Location
New York
I haven't heard anything about this in a while. I still try to burn in my chips after overclocking a PIII 450 to 600 stock everything many years ago.. It was the only time I remember such a increase, I still burn in my chips today.. but I don't see burning in helping my overclocks at all... has it helped you??
 

oops

Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2002
no, I just take that as a stress testing, no help at all besides that
 

JaY_III

Senior of BX
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
VOODOO MAGIC
VOODOO MAGIC
VOODOO MAGIC
VOODOO MAGIC
I say burning is is nothing more that VOODOO MAGIC!
Helps some , hurts others, does nothing for the rest
VOODOO MAGIC
VOODOO MAGIC
VOODOO MAGIC
VOODOO MAGIC
 

mugambo

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2001
Location
Earth
I still do the burn-ins. At this point I don't know if it really helps for overclocking at all. At one time I didn't think it was useless; however, after hearing Jay harp on it for a long time, I REALLY have no basis to argue with the "VooDoo" statement. Even if it doesn't help overclocking, what it does server is, yes, to stress test the system.

Another word that comes to mind in addition to "VooDoo" is "Fad". To say the least, burning in is no longer the current rage and is of little quantifiable value for overclocking. I will continue to burn-in for stressing the system before it is "released".

Dave
 

JaY_III

Senior of BX
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
Overclocker456 said:
How long do you burn in your CPU??

thier is no set time
thier is also no proof that burning in works, thus : VOODOO MAGIC

the idea is to Raise the Voltage and run the CPU at the slowest possible speed under 100% full load for X time, causing electron migration to kick in and fill gaps in the silicon and such so less voltage is needed.
 
OP
Overclocker456

Overclocker456

Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2002
Location
New York
jay said:


thier is no set time
thier is also no proof that burning in works, thus : VOODOO MAGIC

the idea is to Raise the Voltage and run the CPU at the slowest possible speed under 100% full load for X time, causing electron migration to kick in and fill gaps in the silicon and such so less voltage is needed.

I'm asking those you said they still do...
 

JaY_III

Senior of BX
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
some people burn in for 2 days
some for a week
and i have seen others that do it for a few weeks
Basicly you do it untill you
A) Notice that burning in helped
B) Give up as the Voodoo Magic hasnt done anything for you

to a quick search in this forum and you will read many peoples sucess stories and failurs.
 

Intrepid

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2002
Location
Boise, ID, USA
mmy P4 is nicely burnt in but is un operational until better cooling and a re-wires rheo bus can be fixed. but yes I notice improvements over time in temps and thus stability when i got my P4, my laptop even had a bit of a burn in and got more stable as a result, seems to be faster on the uptake after a week of use, and believe me with my main rig out of comision it gets used.
 

mugambo

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2001
Location
Earth
I had 4 different Celeron 500s that I used for overclocking. All of them had trouble with 600 and 585 MHz before doing the "burn-in" -- one of them had trouble at 563. After the burn-ins, all of them would do 620-660. I would have and DID swear that the burn-ins helped. With the 1 GHz Athlon, burn-in didn't change anything. It ran at about 1466 before the burn-ins and it still runs at 1466 presently. Haven't messed with the clock speed in about 6 months though.

The 1.3 GHz Athlon? Runs at 1466 GHz both before and after burnin.

4 different Celeron 733s all run at about 1050 MHz with and without burnins. With the CPU pin modifications, they will typically run at 1100-1144 MHz, but they run hotter. I just keep them at about 1045 or something like that.

The motherboards that I have for the 2.0 GHz Celery is a Dell board. The overclock potential is shelved (for now).

The 1.8 GHz P4 is on a SuperMicro stupid board that allows no overclocking -- again, any overclocking on this is (for now) shelved.

The Celeron 850 ran at 1105 or so before burn-in and like the other 4 celeries, I run it about 1050 MHz. It will run at about 1147 or so with the pin voltage mods, but again, it runs hot and I rather choose to run it at 1050.

The Katmai 500 MHz P3s that I had (2 or 3 -- I forget) would all run at 560 MHz -- and they would never budge.

(Not going into the P2s)
[Not willing to discuss what I have done at work publicly].

And the laptops. Yeah, they suck.

Like I said: I still do the burn-ins because at one time I thought it worked. I really can't say that I think it works other than hey:
It SEEMED to work on EVERY Mendocino Celeron that I tried it on. Still waiting on it to work again, and I been waiting for quite a while.

Dave
 

jokrswild

Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Location
Ohio
hey, now i know exaclty how to burn in. but one question. what vcore should you push? the highest it goes, or just stock, while the cpu runs slow?

I've VID PIN modded my p4, so i can get the vcore up to 1.85.. hmm.. I'll try burning in a bit tonight, maybe get a better oc. :-D
 

JaY_III

Senior of BX
Joined
Dec 17, 2000
burn in at the highest Vcore (that you feel safe with) at the slowest speed you can run the CPU at....
When this is going on, keep the CPU at 100% full load for atleast 48Hours..
 

phantom punisher

Member
Joined
Jan 4, 2001
Location
fort drum NY
opps i forgot to mention i had another p3 800E that did not benifit from burn in at all. it was a overall bad chip for overclocking. 910ish was its max and in smp it wouldnt go past 890ish. that jerk got pelted up to speed with my other awsome chip that did 1080 on its own
 

BaldHeadedDork

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
I've run Prime 95 for two days on every system that I've built (apx. two dozen) in the last six or seven years.

My overclocking results have largely mirrored what mugambo said. Sometimes it seems to help overclocking, sometimes it doesn't. But I've never looked at burn in as an overclocking tool. I always thought its greatest benefit was stress testing the system before I put it in the customer's hands. Twice it uncovered problems with the PSU that I otherwise would not have known about until I got an angry phone call.

Just my $0.02


BHD