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ASUS Z97 Pro Gamer - First PCI-E x1 Slot w/ NVMe

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Tyerker

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Hi guys, long time no post.

I'm looking at adding WiFi to my system. Checking the motherboard, I have 2 empty PCI slots (remember those?), and 2 empty PCI-E x1 slots.

The first PCI-E x1 slot is in line with the m.2 slot. I have this m.2 slot populated with an Intel 600p NVMe SSD.
Will this NVMe drive being installed disable the PCI-E slot that is in line with it?

The other PCI-E x1 slot looks like it would bump right up against the fans of my GPU, so if I can use the slot above the GPU (closest to the CPU) that would be ideal. But if having NVMe installed disables this top PCI-E slot, I'll need to plan differently.

I found the manual and it says the m.2 shares bandwidth with the PCI-E x1 slots. Do you think this would cause slowness from a network side or from a data access side?

Does populating an m.2 slot with a NVMe/PCI-E SSD disable the PCI-E slot in line with the m.2?
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Will this NVMe drive being installed disable the PCI-E slot that is in line with it?
According to your manual, I'd gather they would both be disabled when using a PCIe based M.2 module (if using SATA, SATA ports get disabled).

I don't see how it would cause slowness from the network side or data access as nothing shares lanes with the Ethernet port annnnnd not quite sure what you mean by data access. You manual doesn't seem to state things slow down so everything else should remain as performant.
 
OP
Tyerker

Tyerker

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
According to your manual, I'd gather they would both be disabled when using a PCIe based M.2 module (if using SATA, SATA ports get disabled).

I don't see how it would cause slowness from the network side or data access as nothing shares lanes with the Ethernet port annnnnd not quite sure what you mean by data access. You manual doesn't seem to state things slow down so everything else should remain as performant.

Sorry, I meant specifically would the WiFi card run slowly, or would the NVMe data rate be slower.

Here's the exact wording from the manual:
"M.2 Socket 3 shares bandwidth with PCIEx1_1 and PCIEx1_2 (in PCIE mode) and SATA6G_4 (in SATA mode) and supports M Key and type 2260/2280 storage devices."

The ethernet is working just fine, but I'm wanting to see if I can do a proper WiFi solution to not have a cable running across the floor. I was of the understanding the m.2 NVMe drives did occupy / use some of the PCI-E lanes for the CPU, but wasn't sure if it would cause an issue where I can't use PCI-E WiFi.

I wanted to avoid USB / PCI WiFi for seemingly obvious bandwidth reasons. Worst case scenario, I just keep running a wire across the floor.

Thanks for the reply!
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
I read the manual too. To me it disables those ports... otherwise you don't have a lot of bandwidth for the M.2 drive.

YOu can attach a USB Wifi adapter to USB 3.2 Gen2 port and get all the bandwidth you need.....


Consider emailing Asus to have them clarify the verbiage. But typically if there is lane sharing it's disabled or specifically tells you bandwidth drops from X to Y.
 
OP
Tyerker

Tyerker

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
Thanks again. This board only supports up to USB 3.0, so I can't use a 3.2 adapter. I might see about the 3.0 adapter.

I did get on with ASUS chat support, the guy asked me to wait for research for like 20 minutes, and then he escalated the ticket. So, we shall see.

Thanks again for the input!
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Sorry, I meant 3.2 Gen1... which is a rename of USB 3.0. :)


USB 3.2 Gen 1: originally known as USB 3.0, and previously renamed to USB 3.1 Gen 1. ItÂ’s the original USB 3.0 specification, and it can transfer data at up to 5Gbps.
USB 3.2 Gen 2: Previously known as USB 3.1, and then later as USB 3.1 Gen 2. It offers speeds at up to 10Gbps.
USB 3.2 Gen 2x2: formally known as USB 3.2, itÂ’s the newest and fastest spec, promising speeds at up to 20Gbps (by using two lanes of 10Gbps at once).


...a 500 Mbps connection wouldn't have a glass ceiling on 3.0. :thup:


Let us know what they say!
 
OP
Tyerker

Tyerker

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
You've always been the man, ED.

I do have 800 Mbps down, but I don't know that I actually saturate that bandwidth often. If PCI-E is a no-go, I will look into the USB 3.0 (thanks for clarifying) WiFi adapters that are available.
 
OP
Tyerker

Tyerker

Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2012
OK, so I bought a TrendNet TEW-809UB. USB 3.0 Wireless AC1900. However, speeds seem to be absurdly low.

Here's my troubleshooting so far:
- Wired connection gets a little over 900 Mbps on Speedtest.
- My laptop's built-in WiFi got a little under 300 Mbps.
- This WiFi adapter only got about 120 Mbps.
- I have tried 2 different USB 3.0 ports on my desktop (both the front panel and a 3.0 off the rear motherboard) and the speed was the same.
- The router is only about 10-15 feet away with a direct sight line.

I realize I won't get the same speed as hardwire. But 120 Mbps is way too low for me to justify the convenience of wireless.

Any ideas for what else to check to see why my speed is SO low?