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ATX12v Switching vs ATX?

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MiNdWaRp

Member
Joined
Apr 18, 2004
Location
Montana
Newegg has a Sparkle psu and a Fortron unit.

They're both the exact same thing I know, but the sparkle is listed as being a ATX12V Switching Power Supply for its type (and its a WHOLE DOLLAR cheaper), whereas the fortron's type is said to be regular ATX.

Whats the difference between the two?
 

larrymoencurly

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
The specs say that the +12V output is 18A max. for the 530W Sparkle, compared to 16A for the Fortron, and the Fortron's +3.3V and +5.0V rails have higher amp ratings.

I'd prefer more +12V amps because newer mobos gobblea lot from this rail, like 8-10A, and many fast graphics cards are powered by this rail as well.
 

GEN_Stone

Registered
Joined
Apr 28, 2004
Location
California
actually... the fortron has 18a on the 12v line too, look at the picture real close :)from what I have heard, they are EXACTLY the same PSU. I recently just bought the fortron and could not be any happier.
 

Electron Chaser

Senior Delta Fanatic
Joined
May 6, 2004
Location
I live by a Delta
MiNdWaRp said:
Newegg has a Sparkle psu and a Fortron unit.

They're both the exact same thing I know, but the sparkle is listed as being a ATX12V Switching Power Supply for its type (and its a WHOLE DOLLAR cheaper), whereas the fortron's type is said to be regular ATX.

Whats the difference between the two?

Switching power supplies are more efficent at converting AC to DC current with less loss due to older methods that primarily use resistors and diodes to change and regulate voltages. They are called switching because they actually continuously switch from to an on and off state resulting in little power loss. In addition Switching power supplies also tend to run a little cooler since lower efficency Power Supplies tend to dissapate their losses in the form of thermal energy.