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Baking dead Hardware?

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Pepi93

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
I just watched Linus bake a dead SSD and NVIDIA GPU and he was successful in reviving the GPU but not the SSD.

How many of you have tried this and been successful at baking dead hardware?

Of those that managed to revive the component, how long did it last after the bake?

I'm just curious for any future potential need :)
 

Mandrake4565

Mr. Clean Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2012
I just watched Linus bake a dead SSD and NVIDIA GPU and he was successful in reviving the GPU but not the SSD.

How many of you have tried this and been successful at baking dead hardware?

Of those that managed to revive the component, how long did it last after the bake?

I'm just curious for any future potential need :)
Baked a Motherboard a while back and it revived it, but it only lasted another 6 months. I will say if you plan on doing this make sure the kitchen is well ventilated because the fumes from it are pretty bad.
 
OP
Pepi93

Pepi93

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
It is suggested that you never use the said oven for cooking food again due to the chemicals. I guess "self oven clean" function can take care of that though.
 

Ben333

Folding for Team 32!
Joined
Feb 18, 2007
I had an ATI X1950 pro, I think that's what it was anyway. I'd bake it in the toaster oven. And then I could play Doom 3 at high quality for 2 - 3 hours. But literally every other time it would start to artifact. Re-bake, and play more! Baked it probably 4+ times, no joke, then got sick of it. The molex connector got all crusty and brittle by that point.

Someone GAVE me an 8800 Ultra that was artifacting. Baked that thing once and it's been fine ever since. Played a couple hrs of farcry 3, but never left it in a machine. Still works, used it the other day. Need to stress test it to know if it's fixed for good I guess.

I had a VooDoo 2 and a VooDoo 3, one I got "dead" and the other just stopped working. Oven trick didn't fix em. (solder reflow obviously wan't the issue)

I think it's a well known "good fix" for video cards that are artifacting, right?
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
I cooked a USB flash drive once. It lived long enough to get the data off (barely) and then died for good. If the part is at all recent (RoHS compliant) the solder will need to hit 450 degrees F. Oven at 475 and watch CLOSELY. As soon as the visible solder turns shiny get it out.
 

Mandrake4565

Mr. Clean Senior Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2012
It is suggested that you never use the said oven for cooking food again due to the chemicals. I guess "self oven clean" function can take care of that though.
I should be dead then, I've been baking in the same oven since and I did it at least 2 years ago.
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Full disclosure Mandrake... that 3rd ear of yours that has grown out of your head HAS to be from that... :shock::escape:
 
OP
Pepi93

Pepi93

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2002
That's what Linus said, no bake food in same oven :D He knows everything!!
 

NiHaoMike

dBa Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
A more controlled way is to use a cheap heat gun, the type used to strip paint. Cut a small piece of solder and lay it on top of the chip being reflowed to help judge when the temperature is just right.
 

SPL Tech

Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2006
I just watched Linus bake a dead SSD and NVIDIA GPU and he was successful in reviving the GPU but not the SSD.

How many of you have tried this and been successful at baking dead hardware?

Of those that managed to revive the component, how long did it last after the bake?

I'm just curious for any future potential need :)

I did it to a laptop and it worked great. Then it stopped working after six months so I baked it again. Then it worked again. Then stopped working four months after that. So I baked it again and yet again it started working. Then it stopped working. After that I gave up. Baking only solved the problem for awhile.

Also, I baked the mother board in a TV once and that fixed the problem, but again it only lasted for so long.
 

Tech Tweaker

Member
Joined
Dec 14, 2010
A more controlled way is to use a cheap heat gun, the type used to strip paint. Cut a small piece of solder and lay it on top of the chip being reflowed to help judge when the temperature is just right.

+1

I do this myself with a heat gun and an IR thermometer to track the temperature of the item I'm heating. Never tried the method of putting solder on top of what I'm heating though. Baking the whole thing may be bad for it in the long run, as it subjects things like capacitors and power connectors to high heat as well (Capacitors have a tendency to explode sometimes when heated by a lot, so this wouldn't be good And power connectors can melt if they get hot enough.).

I've found it much more efficient as you can direct the heat right at the GPU core.