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Batteries - Rechargeable "AA" "AAA"

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DohDoh

Member
Joined
May 20, 2003
I have a few devices that use "AA" and AAA" batteries. Who here has purchased reliable rechargeable online at a good price? A few years ago I remember getting unknown rechargeable NiMh and they lasted only a hundred charges.
 

petteyg359

Likes Popcorn
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
Sony's CycleEnergy (Amazon.com has sales on them occasionally, sometimes bundled with a charger) are pretty darn good. They last forever, and are suppose to not lose charge for a much longer period of non-use than other NiMH, and be rechargable more times. The charger I have also has a "memory" button that will fully discharge before recharging.
 

Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
I've talked to a couple people that had excellent results with these guys: http://www.cheapbatteries.com/
I personally have not used them yet, though i intend to soon.

Do not buy ebay AAs from china, there are two flavors listed, 1100mah and 2700mah. The 2700's are 1100's with fake labels. Complete garbage.
 

Zap

Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2002
I'm a fan of LSD batteries (Low Static Discharge). These type of rechargeable batteries can hold their charge for a long time, unlike "normal" NiMH batteries which start to noticeably have a lower charge after a couple months. This means you can use these batteries in devices which aren't used that often, and even if it sits months or even a year untouched, you can still use it. Some of the better known are Sanyo Eneloop. They don't have too high a MaH rating (2000 for AA maybe?) but besides their LSD properties, they seem to retain a higher voltage longer. Some devices are picky about that. For instance, I have a Kodak digital camera that I hated because I would only get 10-20 pictures on a fresh charge, and sometimes even less! I used three different kinds of NiMH batteries before I tried the Eneloops. With the Eneloops I would get in the hundreds of photos before the low battery indicator would come on and the camera would shut off. That is literally at least 10X more useable life. The other batteries worked great in LED flashlights so I know they work, but my camera thought they didn't have enough charge.

Regarding the lifespan of the batteries, you can extend that greatly by using a good, smart charger. I have a La Crosse charger similar to this one. These good chargers can condition batteries, discharge before charging, not overcharge if you forget to take the batteries out, charge one battery at a time instead of requiring pairs, give the status of the battery to identify weak/dying cells.
 

Guardian01

Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
i just bought these for use with my laptop wireless mouse. bought it from microcenter for $10. i'm sure it's not the best in terms of rechargeable amount or charge hold latency, but i like how if i need a charger it's always right in front of me
 

Bobnova

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2009
1300mah isn't much, but the novelty factor (and easy of finding a charger) helps a lot.
 

Aslan

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2002
Location
North Vancouver, Canada
I'm a fan of LSD batteries (Low Static Discharge). These type of rechargeable batteries can hold their charge for a long time, unlike "normal" NiMH batteries which start to noticeably have a lower charge after a couple months. This means you can use these batteries in devices which aren't used that often, and even if it sits months or even a year untouched, you can still use it. Some of the better known are Sanyo Eneloop. They don't have too high a MaH rating (2000 for AA maybe?) but besides their LSD properties, they seem to retain a higher voltage longer. Some devices are picky about that. For instance, I have a Kodak digital camera that I hated because I would only get 10-20 pictures on a fresh charge, and sometimes even less! I used three different kinds of NiMH batteries before I tried the Eneloops. With the Eneloops I would get in the hundreds of photos before the low battery indicator would come on and the camera would shut off. That is literally at least 10X more useable life. The other batteries worked great in LED flashlights so I know they work, but my camera thought they didn't have enough charge.

Same. I've had good experiences with both Eneloops and Duracell Low-Discharge, which are supposedly re-labelled Eneloops. The only flaw is that capacity-wise LSD's are lower than regular NIMH batteries, but they are very useful if you don't need to use all the stored energy at once.

www.thomasdistributing.com is probably the best store for batteries and chargers, but you'll probably be able to find better prices for batteries if you look around. I can't really help with that since I'm in Canada and all the deals I know are only relevant here.
 

larrymoencurly

Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2002
Look for models that can automatically charge both NiMH and NiCad cells safely, without being so dumb that they the need you to flip a selector switch. The chargers from the major battery makers all seem good, but I've also had good luck with Charge Pro models by Spike (ChangZhou) Electronics, which Fry's sells.
 

cyberfish

Member
Joined
May 23, 2008
Location
London, England
NiMH batteries have virtually no memory effect, and don't need to be discharged before charging. NiCd does.

It's important to find a charger that supports the battery chemistry, because different chemistries have different cut-off methods. For example, NiCd chargers typically use the "negative delta V" method, because for NiCd batteries, the voltage will keep increasing while it's being charged, but will drop a little once it's full. NiMH also shows this effect, but to a much lesser extent, especially when charged with a lower current.

If you use a NiCd charger to charge a NiMH, and it expects to see the negative delta V, it will probably over-charge, which will permanently decrease the battery's capacity in the best case.

And super-fast chargers will significantly reduce the lifetime of the battery. I think the maximum recommended charging rate for NiMH is 1C (finish charging in 1 hr, regardless of capacity) or something like that. 15 minutes would be 4C.
 

Randyman...

Member
Joined
May 8, 2004
Another vote for Sanyo Eneloop! I prefer those in things like Mice and Remotes that have very low current draw, but they also work fine in cameras and such. A fantastic multi-purpose battery that shines in both low and high draw devices IMO...

Generally, any Sanyo batteries will be of high quality. GP is another one known for their performance in the RC world :)

:cool: