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Best fan configuration.

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Chris H

New Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2003
I did a search but didn't come up with anything. Right now I have two 80mm fans mounted in the bottom of my case blowing fresh air straight up toward the processor and memory and all the good stuff. I then have a third 80mm fan sucking cool air in from the back and pretty much putting it across the top of a cheap CoolerMaster fan/heatsink.

I want to put two more 80mm fans in the top of the case sucking the hot air out.

I figure this way, I can capitalize on the fact that hot air rises, plus drawing air in fro the bottom gives me just a *little* bit cooler air coming in.

This is what I've got right now:

Penitum 4.0A Northwood 2.0GHz overclocked to 2.5GHz with standard Vcore volatge and FSB of 125MHz

Abit BG-7 with PCI bus locked at 33MHz

256MB PC2100DDR

Ambient temperature is 21 degrees C
System temperature is 21 degrees and processor temp is 35.5 degrees Celsius at idle fully warmed up.

I'm running Prime95 on torture test right now to see what I can get the load temps up to, but is it normal to see your system temp equal to that of the ambient temp? It seems sort of surreal to me.
 

stan03

Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2003
WELCOME TO THE FORUMS

no that isn't too strange.... i think system temp is the temp of the mobo and i guess is very well ventilated your mobo temp could be around ambient.
 

archilochus

THE Senior FANMAN
Joined
Sep 26, 2003
Location
Houston,TX-USA
WELCOME TO THE FORUMS: Sounds a little off.It would be hard not to produce any heat from the mobo if the rigs running.But
anything is possible.The standard fan config. would have the rear fan as an exhaust fan.The idea being to have the air travel front to rear.The majority of your heat producing components are in the rear of the case.This is the shortest path to remove the heat
from the case.Each application is different.Experiment if you want.
Try turning that rear fan around as an exhaust and see what you
get temp wise.Keep your flow up & temps down,THE FANMAN:cool:

LINK

Please read post half way down page and whole thread.:(
 
Last edited:

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
Chris,

I like your thinking.
My personal experiments are ongoing, but I disagree with the common theory of intake fans in the front and exhaust fans in the back ( sorry, Archi!)
Using vertical airflow gets the natural tendency of heated air to rise working for you.
I have two exhaust fans in my case roof and have discovered that just the hole is nearly as efficient as the hole/fan combo.

Keep thinking vertically is my advice...
 

Havoc_

Registered
Joined
Apr 4, 2001
Indeed warmer air rises and cold air falls. However, this does not account for the turbulent airflow that is created inside of a computer case. The wiring, indeed the heat cases themselves cause air movement within the cases. I would not count on the "hot air to rise" as you say inside the case to take care of problems. There are many excellent sites for ducting that would help you immensely with this problem.
 

clocker2

Member
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Location
Mile High
Havoc_ said:
Indeed warmer air rises and cold air falls. However, this does not account for the turbulent airflow that is created inside of a computer case. The wiring, indeed the heat cases themselves cause air movement within the cases. I would not count on the "hot air to rise" as you say inside the case to take care of problems. There are many excellent sites for ducting that would help you immensely with this problem.
I didn't mean to imply that simple convection would solve the problem, just that using it would make life simpler.
I think that quite a bit of the turbulance that you refer to is actually a byproduct of trying to establish a horizontal crossflow in the case.