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Broke off some pins on my CPU

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weetoots

Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Location
Hawaii
It's been a goofy year. Now I have killed my AMD A10-7850K, I damaged one corner, bending some of the pins. I then tried to straighten them and some broke off. Gee, I haven't even run the CPU.
Is there anyone who can weld new pins, replacing those I screwed up? Or do you know someone who can, including AMD? :-/ :shock:
 

Itachiii

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
It's been a goofy year. Now I have killed my AMD A10-7850K, I damaged one corner, bending some of the pins. I then tried to straighten them and some broke off. Gee, I haven't even run the CPU.
Is there anyone who can weld new pins, replacing those I screwed up? Or do you know someone who can, including AMD? :-/ :shock:

I don't think it's possible by anyone. Say you find someone to solder the bent pins, there is no guarantee it will work or even if it works, they will stay soldered under heat and voltage load.
 

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
well depending on where they are at, there is a slim chance you might be able to solder them on. i dont know how hot the pins get vs the cpu core so watching the melting temp of solder to pin temp is probably going to be hard.

i dont know if they make this but you might look at epoxy instead some that is electrically conductive. then try to keep the epoxy as thin as possible so the pins are all equal length and close to the same thickness.
 

Itachiii

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
well depending on where they are at, there is a slim chance you might be able to solder them on. i dont know how hot the pins get vs the cpu core so watching the melting temp of solder to pin temp is probably going to be hard.

i dont know if they make this but you might look at epoxy instead some that is electrically conductive. then try to keep the epoxy as thin as possible so the pins are all equal length and close to the same thickness.

Epoxy will gradually peel off due to heat so the result will be the same in the end.
 

Evilsizer

Senior Forum Spammer
Joined
Jun 6, 2002
well doesnt it depend on temps? i mean i have seen somethings epoxied on and never come off unless they were placed in the freezer then pried apart. the 3DFX Voodoo 4/5's have the hs's epoxied on, granted i dont know what temps those hit. its possible to be in the same temp range but like i said i dont know how hot some of the pins can get. as im sure voltage pins would run hotter then non-voltage pins.
 

Itachiii

Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
well doesnt it depend on temps? i mean i have seen somethings epoxied on and never come off unless they were placed in the freezer then pried apart. the 3DFX Voodoo 4/5's have the hs's epoxied on, granted i dont know what temps those hit. its possible to be in the same temp range but like i said i dont know how hot some of the pins can get. as im sure voltage pins would run hotter then non-voltage pins.

Exactly. It depends on the quality of the epoxy as well. I've used cheap epoxy for marine applications and it would come off in the summer while heating--> cooling cycle occured. Cheap like 5-6$ for 100mL glue + catalyst. Now if the op goes for some more expensive heat resistant epoxy and even then, I'm not really sure it will last for long.
 

WhitehawkEQ

Premium Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
Best bet is buy a new CPU, and if a pin gets stuck in the socket then you'll have to get a new MB as well. And if Elmer Fudd ever stoped hunting and became a PC tech, he would say "Be vewy vewy cawfull" :rofl:
 

Tír na nÓg

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2015
Depending on the broken pins, the CPU might still work.

If you are lucky, those are IMC pins, and one or two memory slots won't work, but the other(s) yes.

Worth a try anyway...
 

Leegit

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Location
Kansas
Real luck would be a pin that is redundant... not something that neuters your PC.

More than likely the outer pins on the chip are going to be for I/O. Though there may be some redundant ground paths on the corners. Only one way to find out.

As a side note, the very first computer I built (15+ years ago)... I accidently bent 2-3 of the pins and had to have my dad bend them back into place. You have to be extremely careful and apply almost no force to not break them or mess the chip up further. Got them all bent back into place and it worked just fine.
 

JLK03F150

What have I done! Member
Joined
May 17, 2005
Location
Georgia
A jeweler who custom crafts gold jewelry can repair your broken pins. You just need to search for a good one in your area.
 

Mr.Scott

Beamed Me Up!
Joined
Jun 9, 2013
Almost any jeweler can repair those pins. You'll need a donor CPU for them to steal off of.
It will not be free of charge. Check cost to see if it's even worth it.
 
OP
weetoots

weetoots

Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Location
Hawaii
I used to Supervise assembly lines in an Aerospace company. Some of those ladies could "weld" hair like wires, all while looking through a microscope (2 lens). They were good, very good. If you think you can do it, isn't the same as I know I can do it. I'll buy a new motherboard and a new APU/CPU.
Thanks for the help
 

magellan

Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2002
I haven't seen pins on a CPU for quite a while, but I've been using Intel for a long time now.
Does AMD still use pins on all their modern CPU's?
 

BugFreak

Joined
Apr 29, 2010
Location
Central FL
Years back on a Barton I was able to stick an extra pin in the socket where the pin would insert to get one to work. Not sure if it works with these newer CPUs but it might be worth a shot. I just found a pin slightly longer and stuck it in there. Call it luck but it worked.
 

benbaked

Folding/SETI/Rosetta Team Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2005
Location
WA
Years ago I had a 486 with a missing pin and according to the socket schematic it was a pin that was used for 32-bit data. The processor worked fine in DOS, if I tried to run something 32-bit the computer would lock up. :p Good luck with your chip.
 

DaveB

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
Years back on a Barton I was able to stick an extra pin in the socket where the pin would insert to get one to work. Not sure if it works with these newer CPUs but it might be worth a shot. I just found a pin slightly longer and stuck it in there. Call it luck but it worked.

Did the same thing years ago when I bought a used AMD CPU and it arrived with broken pins. Worked great but then I had to sell the CPU and motherboard later as a combo with full disclosure.