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Building a new rig - a few questions!

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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Hello good people!

Was looking at the following build to use for the next 4-5 years or so:

Motherboard: Was looking at lower-mid range mobo's like: ASUS TUF Gaming Z490-PLUS/Gigabyte Z490 Gaming X/MSI MPG Z490 Gaming Plus (I usually go with lower-mid range because I don't need a lot of stuff. I never use secondary PCIe cards aside from my GPU, I only need like 3 USB ports, I'll only have one NVMe SSD and one SATA SSD and that's it)
CPU: i9-10850K (120$ cheaper than 10900K over here in The Netherlands..)
Cooling: Not sure yet, either a bang for my buck CM EVO 212 or if I go hard, an AIO such as Arctic Liquid Freezer II 420 or Corsair Hydro Series H115i PRO
GPU: ASUS RTX 3070
RAM: Was thinking about keeping my Corsair Vengeance LPX 4x8 GB 2400 MHz or is that too slow and out of date now?
SSD: Samsung 970 EVO 1TB OR 980 EVO 1TB

I read some stuff about how the Z490 motherboards have issues with voltages, especially when the Turbo Boost activates and all that they'll overvolt (as high as 1.5v?) and the required power draw becomes extremely high as well.

1) How bad is it to just leave everything at stock? I know that can vary from mobo to mobo, so is it known which mobo's in the Z490 range are doing a not as terrible job in that department?
2) I usually overclock but I read that it's quite hard to get a higher all-core overclock than what the max turbo boost (5.2) on these things is.. From my research I've hardly seen anyone get higher than 5.3 stable on the 10900K/10850K, and that's WITH high end water cooling, that's why I'm wondering if it's worth it to even go for overclocking, I might just get a budget air cooler and leave it on stock..
3) I bought a good quality PSU 3 years ago, Seasonic G-Series 550W, will that be enough for my rig? It looks like it's cutting it close on several psu calculators, but if these motherboards overvolt my cpu and the power draw dramatically increases it's probably not enough, thoughts?
4) I couldn't really find any clear info on how much performance one loses when running a 980 EVO on PCIe 3.0.. Is it still significantly better than a 970?

Thanks in advance!
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
A. 2400 is too slow. You'll want 3600 cl14/cl16.

1.nothing at a wrong with stock settings.
2. 5.2 ghz is two core boost. All core on that cpu is 4.8 ghz. You should be able to reach 5 ghz all c/t.
3. 550W is cutting it close with overclocking. 650W+ there. Stock it should be fine.


Hope this is a start!
 
OP
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
A. 2400 is too slow. You'll want 3600 cl14/cl16.

1.nothing at a wrong with stock settings.
2. 5.2 ghz is two core boost. All core on that cpu is 4.8 ghz. You should be able to reach 5 ghz all c/t.
3. 550W is cutting it close with overclocking. 650W+ there. Stock it should be fine.


Hope this is a start!

Thanks a lot ED, kinda cool to still see you around here after all these years!

A. Loud and clear.
1. I saw this:
and got worried, do you disagree?
2. Yeah, another question about that. Those 5.2 GHz max turbo boosts, according to articles I read, are only for a specific amount of time? I don't understand how that is something we'd want.
3. Thanks!

I just now read articles on the new Rocket Lake chips that are supposed to come out in Q1.. Kinda feel like waiting now..
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Good to see you too! :)

I've watched that GN vid, yep. I've run auto or overclocked without issue. If you are worried, disable MCE where possible (like on Asus boards).

Correct, that is how turbo works in these modern processors. that said, many motherboards (as you saw from the video) bypass that. ;)

RL may be worth waiting for. I'd imagine them to be as fast as the AMD chips that are out now.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Good to see you too! :)

I've watched that GN vid, yep. I've run auto or overclocked without issue. If you are worried, disable MCE where possible (like on Asus boards).

Correct, that is how turbo works in these modern processors. that said, many motherboards (as you saw from the video) bypass that. ;)

RL may be worth waiting for. I'd imagine them to be as fast as the AMD chips that are out now.

Alright, thanks for the input, what board did you use?
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
If you decide not to overclock, you won't need a Z class motherboard or high end cooling and so you could save some money on those two components.
 

bmwbaxter

Joined
Jun 9, 2010
If you are looking for 4-5 years of life, I recommend only running at stock. You will be leaving some performance on the table but it will help ensure the system doesn't degrade and requires the least amount of tweaking now and moving forward. Also don't go for an AIO if you want longevity.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
If you are looking for 4-5 years of life, I recommend only running at stock. You will be leaving some performance on the table but it will help ensure the system doesn't degrade and requires the least amount of tweaking now and moving forward. Also don't go for an AIO if you want longevity.

Really? Aren't these CPU's supposed to have like 10-12 years of life? Does it degrade that much when you overclock?
 
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bmwbaxter

Joined
Jun 9, 2010
Depending on the overclock (voltage/temps) it will depend on how much it degrades. I have had it on a 4770k where the overclock I originally setup wasn't stable after 24 months. The cpu still worked fine it just required more voltage to achieve the same clocks. So was a hassle just something to consider for your build since you are looking long term with it.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Okay guys, I may decide to go to a different route. I might buy an i9-9900K since I can get a very good deal on it and I *think* I wouldn't have to upgrade my motherboard. But that's immediately the question, I read this review showing that theres a huge difference between a budget z370 mobo and a flagship z390.

https://www.techspot.com/review/1730-intel-core-i9-9900k-core-i7-9700k/page5.html

I have no idea whether a 9900K wouldn't run great on my ASUS ROG STRIX Z370-H Gaming, do any of you guys know?

For reference, I'll still be upgrading my memory etc.
 
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baris_

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2010
Thanks ED,

Please excuse me for a lot of the back and forth. I'm quite settled on what I have now and I'm ready to buy..

Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400A
PSU: Corsair TX750M 80 Gold Plus
Motherboard: ASUS Prime Z490-A
CPU: Intel Core i9-10850K
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U12A (decided to go on a high-end air cooler)
RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 3600 MHz 32 GB
GPU: Gigabyte RTX 3070 Gaming OC 8 GB
SSD: Samsung 970 EVO

The only thing I was worried about is whether the cooler would fit and not touch the RAM or any other heatsink. It seems that the heatsink is 41mm off of the bottom and the fans stick out rather minimally, maybe 1-2mm and the RAM I chose is about 32mm, so that should be fine right? See attached pictures:

195c1546-a93a-45ba-92e8-23a1f30f04e6._CR0,0,300,300_PT0_SX300__.jpg

81JXXmBCaUL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
 
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Zerileous

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2002
The fans are adjustable so you can have one of the fans elevated to clear the ram. Also strictly 2 fans are not necessary, there is a single fan version available U12S that I believe has similar performance https://www.overclockers.com/noctua-nh-u12s-heatsink-review/. I don't know however how the demands of a 10 series would effect that compared to the overclocked Haswell used, but I'm sure you could dig up more reviews if interested.