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Certifications for web dev?

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Suppressor1137

Member
Joined
May 4, 2011
So, im 25 years old, i have a high school diploma, and attended community college pursuing an electrical engineering degree, until I realized that wasn't quite what I wanted to do.

I have had a very strong passion for Computers since i was about 7 years old. Some call me an enthusiast.

About 5 years ago, I started doing professional web development utilizing the basics, html5 ,css3 php, and JavaScript, with my skillset focused into css3.

I have the ability to convert entire websites into fully responsive layouts, this is my strongest and most practiced skill.

I used the cms WordPress in almost all of the websites I worked on, mainly because that is what the company I did work for was able to sell.

I have no formal training in the field, I'm completely self taught.

Does anyone have any pointers they can give me to get hired in a web developer position? The company i worked for was a startup that afaik went under, and I don't know if I can claim the websites that I worked on for building a portfolio.

would getting the a+cert or any others be worth it to pursue web development?
 
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EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Moved your post to a new thread instead of one over 14 years old necro'd by a spammer.


I dont know much about web dev, but i can tell yoy A+ has literally nothing to do with it. A+ is basic elementary hardware. You dont need to know that to web dev. ;)

Considering looking at web jobs and see what certs and knowledge they need...
 

TechWizard

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
I'm just a few years older than you and followed an eerily similar path you described.

My dad got a Leading Edge 486SX when I was 4 and I got hooked on computers from that point.

I did the part-time student deal for several years at community college while working for a computer repair shop. In the long run I decided to attend a nearby University for a year in pursuit of EE. Due to the curve passing grades were in the low 50s and I immediately knew I did not want to spend $10,000 a semester where that was the acceptable standard. Obviously there is a lot more to it than just this, but I won't bore you with my life story :) I did my fair share of chasing start ups as a product developer. Maybe we should combine our skill sets and make the next big thing ;) :rofl:

What I learned... was in the end it didn't matter if I had certifications or a degree. I already had learned how to survive and make a living based on the skills I picked up in the field, going through the college experience, and other side work. Presently, I'm working for a fairly respectable company doing nearly all fields of IT Support and that was not where I was expecting to be right now.

I have no certifications and no degree. I was quite worried I'd have a hard time finding a position with good pay, benefits, and hours working a job I'd actually enjoy. I was surprised that in under 3 months of searching I found my current position.

Finding a job in IT is definitely unique in the respect that you can find great paying positions without a degree/certs as long as you have the experience/skills required for the job and can prove it.

With that said it is still important to remember that they don't hurt to have. It helps to be articulate in person and in general to have good 'people skills'. There is no shame walking into an interview and telling your possible future employer that you are self-taught. If anything it will be more impressive to them when you can answer their questions and pass their tests. As long as you have skills, the motivation to work, and can show people that you are golden.

If you have the experience it is just up to you how you want to go about obtaining the position you want. You could get Certs that prove you have the HTML, CSS, php, JS experience just so you could put that down on your resume in hopes it bumps it up higher in the pile.

Personally, what I did was created a resume that wasn't your typical black and white list of skills, abilities, and work history. I setup a webpage to represent myself and to show that I have the correct skill set to work professionally in IT. It was also a good speaking point in interviews as web development is not my focus whatsoever.

All of the work you did previously for start ups is work you can use in your portfolio and claim as your own as long as you were the original creator. If the company went under then there is no entity that can claim copyright to your work. Any sort of contract or agreement you made with them is null and void the moment the company is dissolved. And usually if a company is already in the process of dissolution there is a good chance they don't care or don't have the resources to stop you anyways. I used one of the start ups I worked for in my work history primarily because of the type of experience that was involved. I got to talk to a lot of investors, work with incubators, recruit members, pitch the product - I had an extremely active role as one of the founding members and this put me out front for every business interaction we took.

So by all means, put together a portfolio with your resume. If you don't have your own website I highly recommend making one that represents you as a person and your work. In my opinion presentation and execution is all that really matters in the real world.

As Ed said - check out some Web Dev listings - if you think you can handle the responsibilities listed in the postings then there is no harm in applying for jobs to see if you get a phone interview. The worst that can happen is no response or they tell you sorry you don't fit their requirements.

You'll find a good job that suits you with or without certs as long as you want (or need lol) it bad enough. :D
 
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Suppressor1137

Member
Joined
May 4, 2011
First of all, thank you so much for the incredible information in this post Techwizard!

I was concerned about claiming my work because of the way things ended. I was threatened with legal action if I did not hand over and delete any and all records on my pc. I kept it on my pc anyways, because It really was all of my work. I planned to ask him later what work I could claim as my own.

About a month later, he offered my job back, after realizing I was indispensable for the company to succeed. I declined, and the owner kind of blew up on me in frustration. I didn't get a chance to ask about the work.

five months later, and we still haven't talked. If it's one thing I learned from all of this, it is not to work with your best friend as your boss.
 

TechWizard

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Did you sign anything when you went into work together? Was an actual business entity formed and registered?

I made the mistake of working with friends too. Or at least working with people and then becoming good enough friends to sour the work relationship beyond a repairable capacity.
 
OP
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Suppressor1137

Member
Joined
May 4, 2011
Only a NDA for the software we worked on, and the pay stubs sign off for when he could pay me.

The rest was basically all word of mouth.

As for a business entity, Thats a weird one. We formed one, and registered with the Better business bureau, but that business dissolved due to lack of clients; We reformed the company about a year later and did some big web marketing stuff, but I don't know that a business entity was ever formed. I was so overworked in those 9 months I didn't do much of anything except work, including thinking. 70 hr work weeks rofl.

When I go to the business websites, its either a blank page, or a "account suspended" notice.

For all intents and purposes, The company is dead.
 
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