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Completely Passive - copper tubing

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jackal2513

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Location
london
Ive seen a long length of coiled copper tubing at my local hardware store and its given me teh idea to do away with all rads and hence all fans. We have our PC's plugged into the electricity so why not just plug them into 2 hoses as well which run to a copper coil somewhere cold in the house.

What i would like to know is if anyone has this setup

1) what sort of temps do you get

2) is it best to put the coil of copper in cold water or have fans blowing over it

3) do you need a massive pump because of the large increase on total capacity




I could easily pipe the connections to my cloakroom where air temp is probably around 20c. I was thinking about either leting the coil hang on the wall and let convection do its work ... or submerging teh whole coil in a plexiglass tank of water. Any clues ?


regards

Richard
 

gahdzila

Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2002
Location
West Monroe, Louisiana
Submerging it in a bucket of water should give you an evaporative cooling effect. But performance might be better just hanging on the wall if the room is as cool as you say it is.
 
OP
J

jackal2513

Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Location
london
thing is it will be in a cloaks cupboard with the door shut ... actually it would be no problem putting a fan or two over it to give it some airflow



i suppose if im doing that then i could just use 2 external rads in there ? Damm, i dont knwo what to do to be honest... not even sure if i like the idea of anything being external
 

Mark Larson

Disabled
Joined
Feb 26, 2003
Location
Assembled in Malaysia
You need to give the heat a way to disperse and for cooler air to enter. I think you could do it with copper tubing to a normal heatercore/radiator, so you can have all the effects of copper tubing's heat dissipation, with a heatercore's efficiency.
 

Toysrme

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
My question is why copper tubing? You'll never achive the same cooling as a heater core with even a 5V 120mm fan on it. Not only that, by the time you do, your copper pipe will be so long you're killing flow rates.

Remember it dosen't take hardly any more than moving air through a good heater core to achive "adaquate" cooling from your system.

Another neat trick I've still not seen anyone other than me mention is the fact that if you run your case fans fast anyways, and you have a large pressure differance; (either way works) You can still "normally" pull enough air through the radiator to only run the heater core's fan when you do something with a higher loading.

The point is that if you have a GPU or a combination of other fans, there is NO reason not to have a heater core with a slow fan on it. The only people that do copper just want to "be different" and have stuff hanging out of their computer :\

What ever floats your boat!
To each his own!
 

Toysrme

Member
Joined
Nov 12, 2001
If I can fit a Ford ranger/Mazda B2000 sieres in my Lian-Li case, only the baby computer guys have an excuse for not fitting one in theirs!

(excluding the guys that purposely do the externial thing)
 

The_Punisher29

Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2003
Location
Montreal
How would perform a waterblock made of a I would say 1/4" copper bar and on top a welded copper pipe which in it the water passes ?
 

juliendogg

Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2001
Location
NC, USA
The_Punisher29 said:
How would perform a waterblock made of a I would say 1/4" copper bar and on top a welded copper pipe which in it the water passes ?

not very well at all. the 1/4 inch base would be much too thick to efficiently pass the heat on to your copper pipe, not to mention the heat has to travel through a joint then through the pipe to the water. the water should make contact with the same bit of copper that makes contact with the die.


J.
 

DodgeViper

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2001
Location
WILDCAT COUNTRY
Some have taken and placed tubing 4 to 6 feet below the ground and pumped water through the tubing using the ground to chill the water. Here in Arizona 6 feet below the surface the ground temp is 72 degree's year round. In other parts of US and world the temp would be lower.

Make a continuous loop around the yard and then back into the computer room.
 

Romebaby

Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2003
Location
CO
The coil by itself won't do it. Submerged in a 5 gal bucket it will keep temps low for a while, depending on your load, but eventually the water may get warm. Here's what I came up with to keep the coil cool. The tubing doesn't kill the flowrate, I've got 35ish feet and I'm only running a Mag2 pump. 3 blocks(1 with a pelt) , 20ft copper coil, and a Dtek hc. If you've only got a cpu block just a coil in a bucket may do it for you. I would suggest not leaving on 24/7 so the water has a chance to get room temp. It takes a couple hours for it to max out.
 

anvil82

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2003
Location
New Jersey
HighFlowRod said:
Completely Passive = No pump

lol that was what I was expecting

Running how much copper tubing just to not have a quiet 120mm fan?

The pump needed would probably put a lot of heat in the water all by itself.

What a PITA that would be. Not worth it at all IMHO.
 

radu386

Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Location
Ontario, Canada
What about a setup like this?

I was thinking about something along these lines:

pipesystem.jpg


Having the water in a reservoir (anywhere between 1 and 5 gallons) located near the ceiling, have an output at the bottom soldered to copper piping that makes a series of turns downward in long, straight runs. This way, the water would have enough time/room to get up a reasonable flow rate, before it's sent through flexible vinyl tubing into the PC to the block.

A pump either in the copper return line on the way up, or at the top near the reservoir (dashed lines) would pull the water up from the block in the PC and let it out in the reservoir. If necessary, there might end up being a second smaller reservoir at the bottom, after the waterblock. This just gives the pump a larger volume to draw water from.

I expect there to be nowhere near enough pressure to force the water up the return column, the pump just pulls the water up into the top reservoir (supported somehow), and gravity does the rest. Since there's no pump on the way down, there shouldn't be any heating of the water before it hits the CPU.

Plus, depending on if the top reservoir's open or not, there may be evaporative cooling. If the return pump's output flows through a showerhead, there would be an added benefit.

The water would be falling somewhere in the neighborhood of between four and six feet vertically, and have a travel distance around 30-40 feet, if not more.

Anybody see immediate problems with this setup that I don't?
 

eaglescouter

Frustrating Senior SETI Nut!
Joined
Dec 9, 2002
Location
CA- Not far from the Allen SETI array
Oops, my error, I assumed we were discussion ground loop cooling.

In the room is a bit different, mostly because your ambient air temperature will be quite a bit higher than the ground temperature. Thus you will need a much longer length of tubing to get the same heat exchange rate.

You may also need to add fins to the pipe to increase the transfer rate.

Good luck, and please post your results.
 

DodgeViper

Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2001
Location
WILDCAT COUNTRY
If running the tubing inside in the same room as the computer the tubing will become the same temps as the ambient air temp or slight higher and you solve nothing.
 

radu386

Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2002
Location
Ontario, Canada
Well, even ambient or slightly higher is better than the +21C over ambient that I'm at right now. There's not really a lot of ground for me to dig into near the computer, just eight feet of poured concrete. I may end up having to put a fan on it, I don't know yet.
Either that or find a new class II or III automotive radiator and adapt one of them.