• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Corei I2500K 24/07 Overclock - Help

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

b0mb3r

New Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2017
Location
Brazil
Hello Everyone,

That is my first thread here, so i'll already apologize myself for my poor english and some misunderstading that might ocurr. :D

It's been a while since i don't OC a cpu, my last one was in the earliest days of C2D6600 when we had FSB instead of BLCK and the rams didn't reach 4 digits speed. My computer have the following SPECs:

Z68AP-D3 Rev 2.0
I5 2500K 3.3 @ 4.7Ghz + Cooler Master Hyper 212X
2x8GB DDR3 1600 CORSAIR VENGEANCE | EVGA GTX560 FTW Edition
2 HD Samsung 1.5TB, 1TB + WD 2TB| Seventeam V Force 850W ZAF
Case: Cooler Master idon't know the model (Sorry about that)

I'm trying to make a stable 4,7GHZ OC. I Managed to do a stable 4,6GHZ only setting the VCore to 1,320. However my vDrop is insane, in full load my Vcore drops to 1.260. I''m trying to reduce this vDrop for a week now and managed something (Explained below).

I changed the following configs in the Mobo:

Vcore - 1.320
Muti Step Load Line - 5
RAM Timing 9 9 9 21
Disabled the power feats (C5 C1 EIST,etc)
Disabled CPU PLL Overvoltage Disabled

With the configurations above i managed the following values during a test using prime95:

OC_2500K.jpg

The problem not showed in the picture is when i stop the stress test and start to play games, such as Civilization VI, my CPU Voltage have some peaks around 1,370. Is this safe?
Other doubt is if my vDrop from 1,320 to 1,260 is normal?
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
I think the voltage peaks during gaming are not unsafe for the CPU.

Your large vdroop may be caused by the fact that the motherboard only has a 5+1 power phase rating.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
Hello Everyone,

That is my first thread here, so i'll already apologize myself for my poor english and some misunderstading that might ocurr. :D

It's been a while since i don't OC a cpu, my last one was in the earliest days of C2D6600 when we had FSB instead of BLCK and the rams didn't reach 4 digits speed. My computer have the following SPECs:

Z68AP-D3 Rev 2.0
I5 2500K 3.3 @ 4.7Ghz + Cooler Master Hyper 212X
2x8GB DDR3 1600 CORSAIR VENGEANCE | EVGA GTX560 FTW Edition
2 HD Samsung 1.5TB, 1TB + WD 2TB| Seventeam V Force 850W ZAF
Case: Cooler Master idon't know the model (Sorry about that)

I'm trying to make a stable 4,7GHZ OC. I Managed to do a stable 4,6GHZ only setting the VCore to 1,320. However my vDrop is insane, in full load my Vcore drops to 1.260. I''m trying to reduce this vDrop for a week now and managed something (Explained below).

I changed the following configs in the Mobo:

Vcore - 1.320
Muti Step Load Line - 5
RAM Timing 9 9 9 21
Disabled the power feats (C5 C1 EIST,etc)
Disabled CPU PLL Overvoltage Disabled

With the configurations above i managed the following values during a test using prime95:

View attachment 189984

The problem not showed in the picture is when i stop the stress test and start to play games, such as Civilization VI, my CPU Voltage have some peaks around 1,370. Is this safe?
Other doubt is if my vDrop from 1,320 to 1,260 is normal?

Vdoorp is normal, it is part of the load line specifications that processor manufactures use to prevent overshooting of Vcore with load variation.

This is a old article about Vdroop and load line that still works the same now.

If you've ever overclocked a system, chances are that at some point or another you've had opportunity to become upset with your Vdroop "problem." Some users, confused as to why their system refuses to exactly match actual processor supply voltage to the value specified in BIOS, are quick to blame the quality their motherboard; still others find fault with the difference noted between their board's idle and full-load processor supply voltages. Actually, load line droop (Vdroop) is an inherent part of any Intel power delivery design specification and serves an important role in maintaining system stability. In most cases, comments regarding unacceptable power delivery performance are completely unfounded. To make matters worse, unjustified negative consumer perception surrounding this often misunderstood design feature eventually forced a few motherboard manufacturers to respond to enthusiasts' demands for action by adding an option in their BIOS that effectively disables this important function.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/2404/5
 
Last edited:
OP
B

b0mb3r

New Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2017
Location
Brazil
Thanks for the replies i`ll keep my 4,7OC Config with the peak around 1,370V.