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Could I put my computer in the freezer?

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npalmi

Registered
Joined
May 28, 2004
Location
New Orleans
What if I put my computer in the freezer, and drill some holes to plug it into the wall? Would that work to cool it (even though it's not normal) or is this a retarded idea?
 

eweast

Registered
Joined
Feb 23, 2003
Location
Dallas, TX
I wouldn't cool the entire case with a fridge. Just cool specific devices with water, TEC, or phase change.

Best thing you can do with a fridge is rip its compressor out and attach the the CPU directly to its evaporator via a special block.

Else you're gonna spend a lot of time and energy and not get that great temps to say nothing of your battle with condensation.
 
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bobad

Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2004
Location
Louisiana
I used to daydream about those little bitty freezers... not much bigger than 2 computer cases side by side. Use the whole thing for a case. Cut holes for external drives, add a pad for motherboard. Mount PS externally.

Another approach would be to take a small de-humidifier and duct the cold, dry air it makes into the case. Drill holes here and there to keep internal case pressure to a minimum, and make the cool air pass over the HDD's before exiting. It makes water, but you can set a reminder alarm to dump it.
 

Sterculus

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2002
Location
Seattle
eweast, if the whole computer is in the fridge, then there should be no problem with condensation, technically. Condensation forms when warmer air comes into contact with a surface colder than the temperature of the air (for example, warm outside air and a refrigerated drink can). Because air can hold less water at lower temps, the air losing heat to the colder object is forced to release some of the water held inside of it, and thus there is condensation. So, to avoid condensation all he would have to do is avoid transfer of air between the fridge and the outside air, which would prevent any condensation. Since that is an unlikely goal, he probably would be wise to try and condensation-proof his computer.
npalmi, you would probably have better performance using the phase change system of the freezer to just cool the CPU itself, which will be much more efficient. If you need more information about phase change, head over to the extreme cooling section, where they are quite knowledgable about stuff like this. I think some people have done the freezer mod before, so maybe you could find some of them.
Anyways, good luck with the project if you decide to go ahead with it, and welcome to the forums!
 

sagitta85

Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2003
Hehe.

"Hey, what do you got in your freezer?"

"Ahhh... left over fish, a few frozen dinners, a computer..."
 

JoT

You can't fire me, I have
Joined
Jun 3, 2002
Sterculus: There is a source of heat inside the freezer, so condensation would still form, but on that source. That source is your computer, basically any part of it. Just sticking your mobo and everything attached to it in a freezer would not work; if you tried it, you soon would have a bunch of dead components to show for your efforts.
 

CPL.Luke

Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2004
well when you stick food into a freezer it gets frost on it so the compute would have same problem

unless you set the freezer on low put a de-humidifier in it for a couple days. and then turn it up. no water in the freezer no frost. but it would cost you a de-humidifier.

but a phase changer costs like a grand so

de-humidifier- 50
freezer- 250?

= 300 :)
 

mantrogo

Member
Joined
May 6, 2004
Location
London
The condensation is not an absolute killer - if necessary coat the entire mobo in silicon sealant! Hmm, OK not sure if that specifically would work, but something like it perhaps. Or, as a post above suggested, use one of those frost free freezers - these are just freezers with built in dehumidifiers.

The other problem is that you could not put the entire computer in there. I suspect that your hard drives, CD and anything else that spins would be REALLY unhappy. Needs to be reasonably warm for the bearings to be lubricated.
 

Evil T C

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2004
Location
scotland
is the build up of frost a real problem?

i'v noticed that phase change systems tend to build up frost around the block after a while.

isnt there an insulating spray you can get for your mobo? you could just coat everything else with that stuff
 

Exempt

Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2003
Location
Los Angeles, Palo Alto, Lake Tahoe
this doesnt work I ve tried it... omfg I just wrote like a half page review on when I did this, and I accidently hit the "back" button on my mouse, so this is the simple response, and now Im ****ed