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Cpu doesn't get enough voltage!

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chainzaw

Registered
Joined
Jul 28, 2010
Hi, I overclocked my i7 860 to 4 GHz and 3,8 Ghz and set the voltage to 1,35v. It gets around 1,32v idle but when i run prime35 it only gets around 1,25 v!

I don't understand why, In BIOS i set it to 1,35 and in TurboV it's also 1,35v...help please.
 

MattNo5ss

5up3r m0d3r4t0r
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
:welcome: to OCForums!

The drop in voltage between BIOS setting and idle is called vdrop. The drop in voltage between idle and load is called vdroop. Both of these are normal. To get your voltage to stay more in line with your BIOS setting, you have to enable "Load Line Calibration" (or whatever your mobo calls it) in the BIOS. You could also just increase your vcore so when the CPU is under load it will still get the needed voltage.
 
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chainzaw

Registered
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Jul 28, 2010
Ok, thank you. But it sounds better to just enable Load Line Calibration instead of higher the vcore.
 

Killador

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Aug 3, 2010
Location
Aurora, Colorado
:welcome: to OCForums!

The drop in voltage between BIOS setting and idle is called vdrop. The drop in voltage between idle and load is called vdroop. Both of these are normal. To get your voltage to stay more in line with your BIOS setting, you have to enable "Load Line Calibration" (or whatever your mobo calls it) in the BIOS. You could also just increase your vcore so when the CPU is under load it will still get the needed voltage.

This works but it will also increase power consumption and heat. Its usually best to leave it off.
 
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chainzaw

Registered
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Jul 28, 2010
But I have to do something, should stay on 1,35 volt and not drop to 1.25 on 100% load!
 

jason4207

Senior Member
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Nov 26, 2005
Location
Concord, NC
This works but it will also increase power consumption and heat. Its usually best to leave it off.

Well doesn't increasing vcore do the same thing? If 2 PCs are both running the same speed at the same vcore under load, but 1 has LLC enabled wouldn't they both consume the same amount of power and produce the same amount of heat under load? And since the PC w/ LLC enabled runs w/ less vcore while idle wouldn't that PC run at a lower vcore most of the time and therefore consume less power and produce less heat?

Does LLC somehow affect the current? Because that's the only way I can see it increasing power consumption and creating more heat.

IMO it's usually best to leave LLC on. At least w/ C2D/Q it has always worked best for me. I have no experience w/ the I-series, so if it's different there let me know.
 

MIAHALLEN

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
LLC enabled will decrease idle power consumption ;)

OCing results are almost always enhanced by enabling LLC, C2D, C2Q, i3, i5, i7....doesn't matter, they all will overclock better with it enabled.

However on my 32nm daily rigs, I have mine disabled for longevity :thup:
 
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chainzaw

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Jul 28, 2010
So i should enable LLC only? Or what do you you mean by C2D, C2Q?
 

MIAHALLEN

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Those are older CPUs....I was answering Jason's question :)

If your CPU is stable, I would leave it as is :thup:
 

Killador

Member
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Aug 3, 2010
Location
Aurora, Colorado
So i should enable LLC only? Or what do you you mean by C2D, C2Q?

C2D = Core 2 Duo chips
C2Q = Core 2 Quad Core chips


There is is a difference between the Core i7 and the C2D and C2Q when it comes to Load Line Calibration. It does help on the i7 for certain tasks and applications. It stablizes the Vdroop very well and the i7's work well with it, but the long term effects can kill your CPU because researchers found it spikes voltages at dangerous levels on load. On idle or less stressful use its ok to keep on. The C2D's and C2Q's were more effective with it turned on.
 

MIAHALLEN

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
There is is a difference between the Core i7 and the C2D and C2Q when it comes to Load Line Calibration. It does help on the i7 for certain tasks and applications. It stablizes the Vdroop very well and the i7's work well with it, but the long term effects can kill your CPU because researchers found it spikes voltages at dangerous levels on load. On idle or less stressful use its ok to keep on. The C2D's and C2Q's were more effective with it turned on.

:eh?:.........Not exactly...

Intel designed their CPUs to droop intentionally, it's a safety feature ;)

LLC is a way for the motherboard manufacturers to cater to the desires of the enthusiast community by disabling droop in a quest for better OCing :thup:
And why, you ask, do they do that? Becasue it works :D
 

Archer0915

"The Expert"
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
:eh?:.........Not exactly...

Intel designed their CPUs to droop intentionally, it's a safety feature ;)

LLC is a way for the motherboard manufacturers to cater to the desires of the enthusiast community by disabling droop in a quest for better OCing :thup:
And why, you ask, do they do that? Becasue it works :D

Intel does recommend not using it though:) But who cares most of us void out warranty the day we get the CPU. Some of us don't even get a warranty:)
 

Killador

Member
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Aug 3, 2010
Location
Aurora, Colorado
:eh?:.........Not exactly...
LLC is a way for the motherboard manufacturers to cater to the desires of the enthusiast community by disabling droop in a quest for better OCing :thup:

Motherboard manufacture = cares about enthusiasts
Intel = don't give a dime if your CPU fries ur eggs in the morning :)
 

MIAHALLEN

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2007
Intel does recommend not using it though:) But who cares most of us void out warranty the day we get the CPU. Some of us don't even get a warranty:)

Hang on Archer, I think you're confused....LLC is a feature created by the motherboard manufacturers to bypass Vdroop (Intel's safety feature).....Of course Intel wouldn't want us to use it, it's a loophole ;)

You'll never find LLC on a Dell or HP ;)
 
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chainzaw

Registered
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Jul 28, 2010
tyvm everyone, i enabled LLC and the volt only drops 0.1 or 0.2 now. I just set it to a little bit over 1,35 for 4GHz and run prime95 for some hours and see if it works :)
 

Archer0915

"The Expert"
Joined
Nov 3, 2008
Hang on Archer, I think you're confused....LLC is a feature created by the motherboard manufacturers to bypass Vdroop (Intel's safety feature).....Of course Intel wouldn't want us to use it, it's a loophole ;)

You'll never find LLC on a Dell or HP ;)

No I said what you did, just a different way.

Intel states it could damage the CPU and that is their story. The MB manufactures want to sell boards so they supply the tool. I simply don't use it because I don't need it. That is fine though because my CPU did not come with a warranty. Cook it and get another.
 

jason4207

Senior Member
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Nov 26, 2005
Location
Concord, NC
Thats true, but the charts are on Antech's review and it shows crazy vcore spikes.

Those charts are not real oscilloscope readings...they are purely theoretical. Show me some real evidence of damage over time. I'm sure we'd have threads dedicated to it here and at other forums if it were as bad as Anand makes it out to be. Many folks here have been running w/ LLC enabled for years.

Look at my posts here to see what happens when I modify Anand's graphs to show what happens when you have to increase vcore to account for LLC being off. Also take note of my other arguments on why the CPU's transistors will probably never see those spikes...there are capacitors on the mobo and the bottom of the CPU to smooth the signal out. Unfortunately, we will never be able to get an oscilloscope inside the CPU (past all the capacitors) to see the actual spikes that the transistors see.
 

Killador

Member
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Aug 3, 2010
Location
Aurora, Colorado
If i had the evidence i would present it. Like Archer stated too...Intel says that it will damage the CPU. Besides...are we talking Core 2 Duo/Quad? Coz thats what your link is pointing toward and talked about in the thread...not the Core i7. Also, Andtech just popped in my head from when i read it...but its not the only source. I'll try to look up some sources i found before talking about this later today.
 

SamSaveMax

Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
LLC is great. A function I've got to have and use. Enabled on all of mine. No problem with longevity just yet.