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CPU Load-line Calibration

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J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
Can someone explain to me what this does? The gist I got was it helps with OC stability. I lowered mine all the way down, and I noticed my temps went down with no signs of CPU instability. Can someone provide some insight. Thanks!
 

MattNo5ss

5up3r m0d3r4t0r
Joined
Aug 11, 2008
It controls the vCore drop between CPU idle and load states. Typically, vCore drops when the CPU is loaded, which could cause instability, but LLC can reduce or prevent that drop.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Yes, except LLC would likely allow you to get buy with lower voltage at idle and reduce the wear and tear on the CPU.
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
If you've ever overclocked a system, chances are that at some point or another you've had opportunity to become upset with your Vdroop "problem." Some users, confused as to why their system refuses to exactly match actual processor supply voltage to the value specified in BIOS, are quick to blame the quality their motherboard; still others find fault with the difference noted between their board's idle and full-load processor supply voltages. Actually, load line droop (Vdroop) is an inherent part of any Intel power delivery design specification and serves an important role in maintaining system stability. In most cases, comments regarding unacceptable power delivery performance are completely unfounded. To make matters worse, unjustified negative consumer perception surrounding this often misunderstood design feature eventually forced a few motherboard manufacturers to respond to enthusiasts' demands for action by adding an option in their BIOS that effectively disables this important function. http://www.anandtech.com/show/2404/5

transient_vdroop.jpg
 
OP
J

J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
If you've ever overclocked a system, chances are that at some point or another you've had opportunity to become upset with your Vdroop "problem." Some users, confused as to why their system refuses to exactly match actual processor supply voltage to the value specified in BIOS, are quick to blame the quality their motherboard; still others find fault with the difference noted between their board's idle and full-load processor supply voltages. Actually, load line droop (Vdroop) is an inherent part of any Intel power delivery design specification and serves an important role in maintaining system stability. In most cases, comments regarding unacceptable power delivery performance are completely unfounded. To make matters worse, unjustified negative consumer perception surrounding this often misunderstood design feature eventually forced a few motherboard manufacturers to respond to enthusiasts' demands for action by adding an option in their BIOS that effectively disables this important function. http://www.anandtech.com/show/2404/5

View attachment 188325


So what I've gathered is that it causes more system stress and is pointless to use unless you think your system instability is caused by Vdroop
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
It's a six of one, half dozen of the other situation.

Personally, I could care less about the meager difference in idle voltage...it's idle... who cares. And if you have power savings on, it really doesn't matter. I typically do not use it unless I have significant vdroop (.05V+).
 

wingman99

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2003
So what I've gathered is that it causes more system stress and is pointless to use unless you think your system instability is caused by Vdroop

Yes that sums it up. Also you can just raise the Vcore for the Vdoop. I just use Dynamic DVID / Adaptive with LLC on Auto plus power saving options on Auto and those settings adjusts the Vcore with load and multiplier.

Example DVID +0.075 Automatically adjusts the Idle 0.800v, RealBench 1.284v, Prime95 1.332v.:cool:
 
OP
J

J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
Here's how I have mine set up
 

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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Can you post a pic of HWMonitor while putting the CPU under heavy load. We need to see the net effect of your settings under load and your core temps. So we would need to see the HWMonitor interface from the top down through the section showing core temps.
 
OP
J

J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
Can you post a pic of HWMonitor while putting the CPU under heavy load. We need to see the net effect of your settings under load and your core temps. So we would need to see the HWMonitor interface from the top down through the section showing core temps.
 

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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Sorry, dude. But I cannot make out a lot of those numbers. If I zoom in to blow the attached pics up on my 24" monitor to make the numbers larger then they become too fuzzy to distinguish. How did you capture those pics, anyway and did you resample them or something?

Easiest way to do this to use Windows Snipping Tool and first crop and then capture and save the pics before attaching them.
 
OP
J

J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
Sorry, dude. But I cannot make out a lot of those numbers. If I zoom in to blow the attached pics up to make the numbers larger then they become too fuzzy to distinguish. How did you capture those pics, anyway and did you resample them or something?

right click it and open it in a new tab, should be able to zoom then

I just took a screen shot, it's on my 27in 1440p monitor and it seems like the foum resizes it to fit
 
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trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Hard to tell from that how much vdrop/vdroop you are really gettting. All we can see is what seems to be the manual vcore setting in bios (1.52) and another pretty wild reading of 1.7 something that can't be correct given your temps. LLC at level 1 is probably supplementing little or none. But if you are actually stable at 4.8 ghz on those low temps then who cares? What kind of stress testing have you done?
 

Johan45

Benching Team Leader Super Moderator
Joined
Dec 19, 2012
FWIW on my ASUS boards I run 5-6 it keeps it level with BIOS setting under load.
 
OP
J

J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
Hard to tell from that how much vdrop/vdroop you are really gettting. All we can see is what seems to be the manual vcore setting in bios (1.52) and another pretty wild reading of 1.7 something that can't be correct given your temps. LLC at level 1 is probably supplementing little or none. But if you are actually stable at 4.8 ghz on those low temps then who cares? What kind of stress testing have you done?

vcore is at 1.250, 1.7 is the vrm. I ran aida64 stress test for a few hours but that was before I set LLC on the lowest setting
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
You might want to run Realbench CPU stress test for 3-4 hr. It's always good to get a second opinion. Different stress testers test in different ways.
 
OP
J

J0ker

Registered
Joined
Dec 3, 2015
Location
Colorado
If the core voltage doesn't fluctuate when it goes under full load does that mean there is no vdroop?
 

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