• Welcome to Overclockers Forums! Join us to reply in threads, receive reduced ads, and to customize your site experience!

Cross drilled blocks, this type be any good?

Overclockers is supported by our readers. When you click a link to make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn More.

strokeside

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2002
Location
Dublin, Ireland
I want to make a waterblock quickly and easily, and the cross drilled type looks good, as I will be using aluminium as the metal, a dremel to drill, and I have BJweld to plug unneeded holes.

I was thinking of using a desing where there are two layers of drilled channels, the bottom (that would be nearest the CPU) would have the inlet water, and the top layer would lead to the outlet. If you looked at the flow from a side-on perspective, you would see a kind of a C-shaped flow pattern.

Assuming I am using 1/2" inlet and eight 3mm diameter holes per layer, sould this perform well. Do these types of block perform well at all? Would it be able to handle a big pelt, say 120W plus a 50W cpu? I have a big rad and a 1000Lph pump, to help you think about it's possibility in my system.

I'm just wondering, as I won't have a big drill until Xmas, so I can't make any wider channelled blocks til then.
 

Albigger

Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2002
i've built an aluminum cross drilled block before with two layers of channels. I used an "M" shaped design, with the bottom and top layers oriented 90 degrees to each other. I used 1/4" NPT ins and outs and the holes are just a little smaller than that. I think the holes I drilled are 5/16" diameter or so.

I used it to cool my duron 750 @ 1140 at 2.1vcore with just a 15foot coil of copper tubing (3/8" I.D. i think) with 2 fans blowing over it (I coiled it in a coil spring type design, one fan at each end). cheap man's radiator:D


anyhow, I'm not sure a block of small channels/restrictive flow can take the load from a pelt, as I've not dealt with them before, but I would venture to say "no." I'll let others comment though.


Oh and I can post pics of the block if you are interested let me know........
 

MajinSSJVegetto

Member
Joined
Jun 8, 2002
Location
Coppell, Texas
One note about using a dremel:

GO SLOWLY.

Really! Take your time. Do small amounts of work at a time and let the dremel stay cool and never work it to hard.
Its a fragile tool, and using it heavily can break it very quickly.
It can easily do this job, but you will have to be careful.
Don't push the tool.
 
OP
strokeside

strokeside

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2002
Location
Dublin, Ireland
slipknot, I have read those articles already, they pretty much got me thinking about this.

MajinSSJVegetto, I hear ya about the dremel, I tried using it to cut off a few pieces from a 2"x2" copper coldplate, and it took forever as I have to go slow and keep letting the drill cool down.

Albigger, I was worried about using such small holes (but it's the biggest my dremel has got), that's why I tried to compensate for it by having a large number of parallel holes.

I guess i will just have to sit around and think about it some more, and i'm pretty sure a good design will come to me.

thanks for the help.
 

JFettig

Hey! I showered! Senior
Joined
Jan 5, 2002
Location
MN
its gonna take a long time to dremel those holes! take it slow
 

Daemonfly

Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2002
Location
NW Pa
I'd suggest using a real DRILL, not the Dremel as it can die fast, especially with the way copper drills.
 
OP
strokeside

strokeside

Member
Joined
Jan 10, 2002
Location
Dublin, Ireland
I'm not usng copper, I am using Aluminium.
I think I might just go the Swiftech way, a high-flow block, with dimples in the aluminium to create turbulence. using 1/2" inlet/outlet should give enough flow.
I think this will be the best design for such a weak drill. Maybe I will use the dremel to do a little design on the plate to direct the flow a bit.
Will show it when it is done and after I have tested it.
thanks.