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Data transfers using Windows and copying files larger than 3Gb.

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TechJunky

Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2007
So in short.... I am copying or cutting a file from one location to another on the same drive and the MAX sustained speed I can get is 150MB/s transfer speeds within Windows. It doesn't matter if I am using an SSD, spindle disk, or raid array...

Shouldn't my transfer rates be faster? Just seems slow with advertised read/write speeds on SSD's showing 400-500MB/s.

Is anyone here doing any tweaking to get faster speeds on large files within windows?
 

||Console||

Member
Joined
Jul 26, 2004
I kinda see somthing similar if I transfer a file from one ssd to anther I get 500-450 for the first 2 gigs then it goes down to 75 -50

xfer.png
 
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sno.lcn

Senior2 Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2005
Location
Atlanta, GA, USA
It's because of disk cache. You'll often see storage reviews refer to a drive's low sustained write speed, which is how fast data can be written to the disk once that fast caching layer is full. If you're writing a large file, you get an initial burst of speed because you're writing to the disk's cache. Then that data is then offloaded to the disk's primary storage behind the scenes. But once that write cache is full, your write speed drops to that of the primary storage media on the drive, whether that's TLC NAND in an SSD or a spindle in a hard drive.
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
It's because of disk cache. You'll often see storage reviews refer to a drive's low sustained write speed, which is how fast data can be written to the disk once that fast caching layer is full. If you're writing a large file, you get an initial burst of speed because you're writing to the disk's cache. Then that data is then offloaded to the disk's primary storage behind the scenes. But once that write cache is full, your write speed drops to that of the primary storage media on the drive, whether that's TLC NAND in an SSD or a spindle in a hard drive.

Simple, concise, and easy to understand. That qualifies as an excellent explanation. :thup:
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
The other thing here is that he is moving large sequential chunks of data. SSD technology's real advantage over spinners is negated in that scenario because there is little random seeking going on.