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does anyone use Intel application accelerator?

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jarthel

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2001
I've asked this question in another forum and the people there don't recommend it.

Thanks for the replies. :)

jayel
 

DocClock aka MadClocker

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2000
Location
Stockton Cal, USA, Earth
I take it that you have an intel board...not many here have experience with intel boards, because they don't allow for overclocking.
I wouldn't use it myself....'cause it sounds like a "prefetching" scheme to me...does Intel say what it does? or how it works?
I ordered the intel cd that was exclusively for PIII owners, and found no usefull software on the entire disk...by the time I got the cd, all the software was outdated.
I think you could do better by just tweeking your settings per the aplication...although I'm intrigued and will check it out
 

rayik

Member
Joined
May 2, 2002
I use version 2.2.0.2126 on rig below. This is suppposedly the "latest" version from intel. It's Intel's replacement for their prior "ATA Utility Driver." So, it's an ATA driver for boards with Intel chipsets.

According to the readme.txt file it is:

"The Intel(R) Application Accelerator is designed to improve
performance of the storage sub-system and overall system
performance. This software delivers improved performance
through several ingredient technologies (components)."

The readme states that you must have the following for it to work:

"* Intel(R) Pentium(R) III or Pentium(R) 4 processor
* Intel(R) 82801AA, 82801AB, 82801BA, 82801CAM,
or 82801DB controllers"

Works fine for me. Without it installed I do not have ATA100. My mobo came with the old ATA Utility Driver. I didn't notice any difference with this new version installed. (I didn't measure performance though.)

If you want to know more about it, I've attached the full readme file that comes with the program.
 

Jirnsum

Member
Joined
Apr 3, 2002
Location
Delft, The Netherlands
I am also using it, because it includes drivers that are newer than the ones that came with XP. These seem to be more stable when the system is overclocked.
 

Mavrick

Registered
Joined
Sep 12, 2002
Location
Brisvegas, Australia
Jarthel

I'm using the IAA and have not noticed any problems with it. To be honest though, I didn't notice any increase in performance after installing it.

There are quite a few issues with it though (as you are aware) so backup your system and then try it out to see if it works for you.


seamadan000,

Does the IAA and the 4in1 do the same job?? I've never read that before. Is there a post or article you can provide to let me read up on it please? Thanks mate.

Cheers
 

FIZZ3

Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2002
Location
NL, Europe
I'm using it too. I must confess I haven't run benchmarks to certify the speed claims Intel makes... just to many drivers and patches to apply and test.

Also note that it's not for Intel *boards* only, but for Intel chipsets on any (3rd party) board.
 
OP
jarthel

jarthel

Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2001
Mavrick said:
Jarthel

I'm using the IAA and have not noticed any problems with it. To be honest though, I didn't notice any increase in performance after installing it.

There are quite a few issues with it though (as you are aware) so backup your system and then try it out to see if it works for you.


seamadan000,

Does the IAA and the 4in1 do the same job?? I've never read that before. Is there a post or article you can provide to let me read up on it please? Thanks mate.

Cheers

4in1 = Intel INF driver + IAA
 

cursor

Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2002
Location
Seattle, WA USA
Yeah, I was running my SiS 645 dx board with an old version of the equivalent SiS utility, and using my CD burner at 32x would KILL my system, so I figured I had a bus master IDE problem. The new version fixed it. So I recommend people installing whatever the latest driver is for their chipset.

Here is the thread where I figured out how to fix my problem:
http://forum.oc-forums.com/vb/showthread.php?s=&threadid=134619
 

Hellraiser

Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2001
Location
vienna, austria, europe, earth
...

well i used the iaa and took the time to boot from the system.
it booted 8 sec. faster.
cant really say if it improved overall system performance, but i gues it did.
the fact that it booted faster made me believe it that the whole system is a bit faster.

all i know, is that it simply enables DMA on the hdd´s in the system, but then again, i could be wrong.

dont remeber what version i had of the iaa

oh, and i think that it only works if u really have an intel chipset ( before you download it off the intel site, you can check out anyway if you really need it, it is somehow listed on which chipset u should use the iaa


just my 2 cents
 

mbentley

Gloriously Lead, Overclockix Chief Architect
Joined
Sep 26, 2002
Location
Indianapolis, IN
i use intel's application accelerator and i find that it makes no difference. i have an intel mobo as you can tell and it find that it works just the same... just figure i'd add my input.
 

baltoos

Member
When I first set up my Abit Th7II-R board, I tried the IAA. I hooked up my 2 hard drives (Maxtor 80Gb & IBM 10Gb) on IDE channels 1&2 w/ IAA. Next, I tried running them through the Highpoint RAID controller ( channels 3&4) running in normal ATA100 mode (no RAID). According to the Sandra benchies I ran, performance was slightly better through the RAID controller. The difference was very small: really not noticeable except in the benchmarks. I guess that IAA might help in some situations, but not all, depending on the system specs. -Dave
 

6502kid

Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2000
Location
Peoria Ill
I tested it, and found no major speed changes between the
windows default, IAA and the older Intel Ultra ATA storage drivers.

But, If you do install, and then uninstall either of them, make
sure you go back into the device manager and turn DMA back
on, or you will be hurting in a major way.

The main difference seems to be the forcing of the DMA, and that
the intel drivers will show the actual drive model in device
manager....

Note, I am using the 815EP chipset. Others may have
different results.
 

AntmanMike

Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2001
Location
Chicago.
This is really what IAA does: It lets you set the DMA or PIO speed. Since XP automatically turns off PIO permanently after 3 UDMA errors, its a benefit. It automatically makes the drives go at their maximum speed.
 

nipster

Pentium III 1.0 ghz collector
Joined
May 1, 2002
Location
Tampa, Florida. USA
you can use the IAA on i810 and later chipsets (810, 815, 820, 840, 845, 850, 860, etc...)

the 440bx, lx, GX and earlier chipsets (430, etc) you need to use the older "ATA bus master" driver or whatever it is called


I have not really noticed any difference in performance either way, but figure, what the hell...
 

tio

Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2003
Location
Hyrule
I tested before and after installing it. It made a small difference, I can't remember exactly in which area(s), but hey, you might as well install it.