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Does OC'ing reduce the life of components?

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voodoomelon

Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2001
Location
Dundalk, Ireland
I always wondered about this.
If you're overclocking your CPU, video card or RAM, will their life span be reduced? Say your running your CPU at 500mhz more than it should, for instance, surely it won't last as long as a similar stock speed CPU?
Or are certain components more susceptible to wear from overclocking than others? For example the video card compared to the CPU?
Thanks.
;)
 

Axis

Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2003
Location
Lakewood Ohio
voodoomelon said:
I always wondered about this.
If you're overclocking your CPU, video card or RAM, will their life span be reduced? Say your running your CPU at 500mhz more than it should, for instance, surely it won't last as long as a similar stock speed CPU?
Or are certain components more susceptible to wear from overclocking than others? For example the video card compared to the CPU?
Thanks.
;)

Sure but is you have good cooling it isn't a concern. That is the key the cooling. Anyway most chips are designed to last for 5 to 10 years.

Are you going to be using the same cpu, mobo, etc.. in the next 5 years? I am not.

I have been overclocking since the 286's and I have never burned anything out and I still know most of the people I sold my stuff off to and they never had anyprobs with what I sold them.

Keep it resonable and keep it COOL. :D
 
OP
voodoomelon

voodoomelon

Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2001
Location
Dundalk, Ireland
Well, me too - I won't be using the same components, in 5 years, but i'm sure someone else will be, when I pass it on, or keep it as a secondary rig.
My god, the thought of having my current speed machine as a secondary rig in 2 or 3 years, with the unholy amount of money I spent on it over the last year, makes me want to puke.:(
 

@md0Cer

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
Location
Denver, CO
Maybe try general computer related discussion or general hardware next time. Or perhaps if there is a specific component you are talking about, post it accordingly ;)

It doesn’t seem as though it is the clock speed that reduces the life of components but the increased voltage that we give the components so they hold the higher clock speed more stable. Cooling if one of the key things heat is still the enemy. I’m not sure if it is voodoo, but it does seem as though the logical thing to do is to keep the components cool. I have heard story's of component failures even with sub zero cooling. Several people with week 10 or older tbred B 2100's have had their L2 cache fail with 2+ Vcore despite the sub zero temps. I’m sure just the average overclock probably does, but maybe from 10 years down to 5, but most of us get rid of our old stuff for the new before the 5 year mark comes :D Just don’t go overboard with the Vcore. My stock vcore on my 1700 is 1.5, I don’t really want to go more than 1.8 so I guess IMO that's the max safe overvolt. I have seen some people go over 2.0 and not have troubles though.
 
OP
voodoomelon

voodoomelon

Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2001
Location
Dundalk, Ireland
Thought it was most appropriate posting here, as I assumed heat would be the biggest factor in reducing the life of any of the primary components. Hence, good "cooling" would be required to sustain the life of the CPU, video card etc. Just wasn't sure if I was right.
;)
 

@md0Cer

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 6, 2003
Location
Denver, CO
voodoomelon said:
Thought it was most appropriate posting here, as I assumed heat would be the biggest factor in reducing the life of any of the primary components. Hence, good "cooling" would be required to sustain the life of the CPU, video card etc. Just wasn't sure if I was right.
;)

hmm, I guess now that I think of it that way, I guess your right! :)
 

johan851

Insatiably Malcontent, Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2002
Location
Seattle, WA
Well, you also have to think about this; "how long is a component's lifespan in the first place?"

It's hard to reduce an unkown...I mean, if you were to run something at stock speeds and stock voltages and never touch it, it's not going to just die one day. No moving parts or anything. Also, heat isn't always the biggest factor. If you give something too much voltage for an extended period of time, you can still kill it regardless of temperatures. P4's experience electron migration over 1.7v even when they're kept nice and cool. Put 3.6v through a water cooled stick of RAM, and it's not going to last very long either, even though it doesn't get hot. But yes, cooling is probably one of the biggest factors, provided you're not throwing a ton of voltage at something.
 

Susquehannock

The Mad Smelter
Joined
Aug 26, 2003
Location
Maryland, USA
Over the years there have been several polls on the
forums asking OCers to vote on this issue.

From what I remember very few have burned up components
from OCing. Far & away the most common cause of failure
is user mistakes.
Silver on the CPU bridges or disconnected fans etc ...

As always ... just my humble two cents. :)
 

archilochus

THE Senior FANMAN
Joined
Sep 26, 2003
Location
Houston,TX-USA
Heat,Heat,Heat,is the killer of electronic components.At least high heat will shorten there life span.The voltages going up produce more heat. Keeping your components cool and feeding them good clean power from a quality PSU are the two most important aspects of your rigs stability and health. THE FANMAN:cool: