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Don't Believe Them! (A Dell Story)

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Pericles

New Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2009
Location
Alaska
Longtime lurker, with many thanks for the helpful information on this site. I thought I would post my story, partly in hopes that no one else would make the same mistake.

My trusty XPS 410 has worked well for three years now, but is much too old to run DirectX 10 or 11. So I decided it was time to upgrade the graphics card. That meant a new PSU. To my surprise, Dell informs its customers that they cannot upgrade their PSU beyond a Dell-approved 500w 28 amp model. Of course, modern cards need a lot more juice. I got the recommended PSU and learned to my dismay that it was barely sufficient to run a GT800, much less a GTX295.

So I had to either get a new computer or ignore Dell and get a massive PSU, potentially frying the mobo. I got a 850w modular PSU, and it runs beautifully. The GTX 295 flies. Of course, my system is "bottlenecked" by the old 2-core CPU that came stock with the system. Fortunately, I doubled the RAM to 4 gigs, and that seems to help. I didn't want to upgrade the CPU, however, because I spent enough money as it was, and the Dell mobo does not come with a socket that supports an i5 or i9 processor.

The lessons here are:
- Don't get a Dell.
- If you have a Dell, don't be afraid to replace the PSU with something much more powerful (in fact, you should probably do so even if you don't think you need to).
- If you don't like being held back by stock components, just save yourself some frustration and shell out the extra money on a new computer.
 

Old Thrashbarg

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
So... what's the problem here? Did you honestly think they were going to give you an official OK on upgrading to random unsupported third-party components?

That's like walking into a Toyota dealership and asking them what sort of Ford engine you can swap into your Corolla.

Edit: And I'm not trying to be mean here. Just take a look at it logically... it could very quickly turn into a tech support nightmare if they sanctioned third-party upgrades like that.

Most companies are going to tell you that they only support the machine in the configuration as it originally shipped from the factory. And that's perfectly reasonable of them to do so. But instead, Dell support is actually willing to work with the customer, at least to the greatest extent they are allowed to, and you end up badmouthing Dell for it.
 
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xtreeme

Disabled
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Location
banned camp
Thanks for the warm welcome.

ohh sorry for that harsh truth , I'm new myself here.

But it is so :( most of us started with OEM pc's - after we built our own we all realized that OEM is ....****... (a fine word for their **** is # compromise beetween performance and price# )
 

Jo3f1sh

Registered
Joined
Jul 27, 2009
Location
Dallas, TX
Well it looks like you're running a 775 Chipset dual core CPU (E6600 in yours) that's in virtually all Dell desktops these days save for the newest XPS's. There's no all-in-one motherboard out there that will accept everything. There's actually 2 different sockets for the i7 processors. 1366 and 1156 which is shared with the i5. The i9 processor probably won't start being shipped in Dell desktops for quite a long time and even then, will have a completely different socket (dual actually) than anything we have now. So i wouldn't knock Dell for the fact that your 2-3 year old (roughly) PC won't accept a different generation CPU.

I would however knock Dell for pretty much everything else...except their monitors. Those are pretty good.

If you really wanted to, you could just upgrade the motherboard to something NOT Dell and probably have better luck with it...something that supports quad cores as well and just upgrade to a newer 775 down the road. With a GTX-295, it'd be a pretty quick little rig.
 

Parad0x420

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2007
Location
Dark Side of the Moon
Ummm.. Why is this in the "Cooling" section?? This seems like it should be posted in a "General Hardware" or something thread, under "another Dell complaint." I don't know what you expected to be able to upgrade to, having a 3 year old Dell system. I'm also not sure how you would expect a 3 year old C2D system to support a completely new architecture that JUST came out within a year ago. And in fact if your computer was a little bit older.. I would NOT upgrade the PSU, as that has caused many people troubles.

Dell does just fine for the average end consumer who doesn't do anything more than play Solitaire, check e-mail, and listen to music and store photos. You should have thought about future proofing more when it was purchased, if you're making that kind of complaint.
 

damarble

Member
Joined
Mar 3, 2005
Location
Spokane, WA
Just be thankful you can upgrade the PSU at all, IIRC a few years ago Dell used their own pin arrangement and aftermarket PSUs would need to be rewired.
 

ps2cho

Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2004
How exactly would a "Massive PSU" fry the motherboard?

Good thing I didn't get a 1000W PSU for my HTPC then huh! Might have made a nuclear blast zone of my DFI LanParty Junior!
 

EarthDog

Gulper Nozzle Co-Owner
Joined
Dec 15, 2008
Location
Buckeyes!
Welcome!!! But yeah, tell us something we DONT know... :)

Like damarble mentioned they used to have some proprietary something on their PSU's making you really not able to upgrade. So you got lucky for having an OEM system. Dont worry, in time we will have you selling that thing on ebay and getting something that may actually push that GTX295 (as well as hoping you have a 1920x1080 monitor already for that beast!!!).

Stick around! :)

How exactly would a "Massive PSU" fry the motherboard?

Good thing I didn't get a 1000W PSU for my HTPC then huh! Might have made a nuclear blast zone of my DFI LanParty Junior!
Wow, nobody is gentle today.... :chair:

But yeah, you cant fry your PSU with a higher wattage PSU. :D
 

xtreeme

Disabled
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Location
banned camp
Honestly - OEM is about giving you a computer with crippled possibilities (especially bios adjustments - they consider you to be a idiot) - it's all about earning your hard earned money on their "support" and aftermarket

:D:D:D:D
 

HoTsHoT

Registered
Joined
Oct 23, 2004
Just be thankful you can upgrade the PSU at all, IIRC a few years ago Dell used their own pin arrangement and aftermarket PSUs would need to be rewired.
Yeah, I knew that after I plugged my Dell PSU to my Asus motherboard few years ago and it got fried. :mad:
 

AEternal1

Registered
Joined
Jan 31, 2008
Location
semi mobile
well..let me add my own two cents here....i am a level 2 dell tech support agent....and seriously, these things arent designed to be messed with. if you want to start messing with computers, you really need to do it from the ground up. messing with proprietary systems is not a good use of money. i personally dont use a dell, only becuase i like to mess with my hardware. my mom is running a dell, because she knows nothing about computers, and she will never have to fuss with it...which is the point of proprietary systems. theyre not designed to be bases for much upgrades.
 

Conumdrum

Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2007
Location
Small town Emlenton, PA
ohh sorry for that harsh truth , I'm new myself here.

But it is so :( most of us started with OEM pc's - after we built our own we all realized that OEM is ....****... (a fine word for their **** is # compromise beetween performance and price# )

My fiirst OEM was a C64, then an Amiga 2000. Went right in to home made 386's in the early 90's I think. Thank goodness they had traveling computer shows back then like gun shows. The internet retail stuff hadn't even begun yet. Went from Denver to the Pomona CA swap meet twice on a tiny Beechcraft with 4 seats.
 

MARCI

Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2008
Location
Folding for T32 in Lawrenceville, Ga
Honestly - OEM is about giving you a computer with crippled possibilities (especially bios adjustments - they consider you to be a idiot) - it's all about earning your hard earned money on their "support" and aftermarket

:D:D:D:D

No, OEM is about providing turnkey systems for joe and jane sixpack. A relatively inexpensive machine that "just works". They make them cheap enough that middle class families feel okay chucking it out every 3 or 4 yearss, or donating it to a family member.

Most computer users aren't willing to overclock, or push their systems, do routine maintenance, or anything else to a pc.

HP and Dell machines are built to withstand the smoker with 3 cats who never dusts. AND STILL WORK.

They're not high performance, and they're not junk.
They're just about right for the average user.
 

xtreeme

Disabled
Joined
Nov 22, 2009
Location
banned camp
Well you are about right in that... but I still consider them as junk :)

This study covers the lifespan for laptops @ http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/...ourth-in-reliability-study-20091118-im8t.html

I haven't seen a similar study for desktops.


I smoke and have a cat - a B I G hairy Maine Coon which never is outside - (had two cats before)- and have a 6 year old computer that have been running 24/7 (homeserver) the last 5 years.... but I dust :D
 

johan851

Insatiably Malcontent, Senior Member
Joined
Jul 24, 2002
Location
Seattle, WA
So I had to either get a new computer or ignore Dell and get a massive PSU, potentially frying the mobo.
The wattage rating on a PSU tells you its power capacity, not the amount of power it tries to "push" into your board. Think of it like a reservoir. Something too small is a problem, but having too much definitely isn't.

Welcome to OCForums! :)