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DSL Modem recommendation (Centurylink)

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Norcalsteve

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2009
Location
Baker, FL
Hey guys,

I've been having headaches with the crappy Zytel modem/router that I got through my ISP--CenturyLink (all that is available in my area for now). I am looking for a good recommendation for a DSL modem that I can pair with a Linksys router to capitalize on my 60mb connection.

Over the past year, I have been through two CZ1100 Modems due to random failures. Last month I purchased a NightHawk D7000v2 all in one to replace the standard low end routers issued by my ISP... Boy, was I disappointed in Netgear! The wifi kept locking up the router, and I was having to power cycle 1-2 times a day. I just got my refund from amazon and I am looking to get a simple wired connection DSL modem, then use a good old fashion top end Linksys router to tie in my house devices (I have about 9 devices wifi linked, and a USB device linked to the router). Your recommendations are welcome!
 
OP
Norcalsteve

Norcalsteve

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2009
Location
Baker, FL
Indeed, those are great cable modems, and I had a similar Surfboard at my last house through Cox. But, I don't believe Surfboards make DSL modems, unfortunately! I hope I get cable in my area sometime soon! I swear, I am sure there are location monopolies being coordinated with the big ISPs!
 

Pinky

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Narf City, USA
Indeed, those are great cable modems, and I had a similar Surfboard at my last house through Cox. But, I don't believe Surfboards make DSL modems, unfortunately! I hope I get cable in my area sometime soon! I swear, I am sure there are location monopolies being coordinated with the big ISPs!

Ah ****, sorry. I gleamed over that part of your post.

Thankfully for the world's internet DSL is slowly disappearing. Unfortunately for you that means suffering with the smaller range of makes/models of modems available.

I wouldn't give up on Netgear. Maybe the Nighthawk was trying to tackle too much. I'm a Netgear owner at home and resell a lot of their products professinally, they're a good lower cost option for most things.

They sell two standalone modems, you might want to look into reviews on them and give one of those models (likely the DM200) a try. Just buy it from someplace like Amazon with a good return policy.

https://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/dsl-modems-routers/default.aspx
 
OP
Norcalsteve

Norcalsteve

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2009
Location
Baker, FL
I wouldn't give up on Netgear.

Agreed, I am pretty sure the Nighthawk I got was just a lemon, but when I talked to Square trade, they said they cant help, and referred me to Netgear; once on with Netgear, they told me they cannot support an exchange! Honestly, the service rep sounded scripted. Hell, most company support models want you to exhaust all avenues before replacing/refund-- Amazon came through within 2 min though, but unfortunately, the Nighthawk is out of stock for who I got it through on the market place so I couldn't exchange it, but they easily offered a quick refund.

I will def look into the DM200! I'll probably just use that as the wired intermediary to then link into a high performance router. Really just looking for NAS support for external HD's, great throughput over the WiFi network, and possible VPN usage to access from outside my network when I am abroad.
 

Pinky

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Narf City, USA
Really just looking for NAS support for external HD's, great throughput over the WiFi network, and possible VPN usage to access from outside my network when I am abroad.

Just about any wireless N router with gigabit ports should suffice. The more wireless bandwidth you want (including AC), the higher the price.
 

trents

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 27, 2008
Actiontec was the modem manufacturer that Centurylink used for years.
 

petteyg359

Likes Popcorn
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
Last month I purchased a NightHawk D7000v2 all in one to replace the standard low end routers issued by my ISP... Boy, was I disappointed in Netgear! The wifi kept locking up the router, and I was having to power cycle 1-2 times a day. I just got my refund from amazon and I am looking to get a simple wired connection DSL modem, then use a good old fashion top end Linksys router to tie in my house devices (I have about 9 devices wifi linked, and a USB device linked to the router). Your recommendations are welcome!

If you're planning to spend money on high-end anyway, get a WRT1900ACS or WRT3200ACM. Do NOT get the WRT32X. Whichever one you get, flash it with LEDE immediately. Go to https://wiki.openwrt.org/toh/linksys/wrt_ac_series#stable ("LEDE Stable 17.01.4), pick the appropriate model number, choose the "system image" download. It will never crash (and IMNSHO LuCI is a way better UI than the trash Belkin/Linksys wrote for it).

I'd advise separate devices for modem and router. The combo devices are near universally much worse quality than single-purpose devices.

No idea what DSL modems are good these days. Only DSL provider in the area is AT&T and they'll offer me a measly 3 Mbps compared to Spectrum's 200 Mbps, so you can guess which one I chose :p
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
Thankfully for the world's internet DSL is slowly disappearing.

Except for those of us who can't get anything else. CenturyStink is the only ISP in my corner of Hell, so I don't have the option of getting ripped off by Cox.
 

Pinky

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Narf City, USA
Except for those of us who can't get anything else. CenturyStink is the only ISP in my corner of Hell, so I don't have the option of getting ripped off by Cox.

Those 'stuck' with DSL are a dwindling number, but there will always be places so remote ISPs simply can't afford to run better solutions to. The implication in my statement was that high speed is creeping its way outward. I suspect remote areas will end up with a reliable, high bandwidth cellular solution at some point (8G, etc) long before cable/fiber could ever reach them (due to those infrastructure investment costs).
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
I don't have, nor do I want, a smart phone. And I live in the capitol of my state. A short half block walk to the main road and I can see downtown. Traffic willing, I'm a 10 minute bus ride from the governor's office and DSL/CenturyStink is my only option.
 

petteyg359

Likes Popcorn
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
Those 'stuck' with DSL are a dwindling number, but there will always be places so remote ISPs simply can't afford to run better solutions to. The implication in my statement was that high speed is creeping its way outward. I suspect remote areas will end up with a reliable, high bandwidth cellular solution at some point (8G, etc) long before cable/fiber could ever reach them (due to those infrastructure investment costs).

Nope. ISPs absolutely can afford to run fiber to everyone and still be profitable, but screw investing when the FCC hands you a free lunch.
 

Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
Nope. ISPs absolutely can afford to run fiber to everyone and still be profitable, but screw investing when the FCC hands you a free lunch.

The definition of "profitable" tends to be up to the shareholders, though. Cox high speed broadband is available directly across the street from me. The problem here is most residents change names/IDs like we change socks. They also pack up and move when their new papers come in, so Cox got tired of being ripped off and just made my little slice of Purgatory a no-go zone. I can get Dish internet, for insane prices that are even higher than the lag times, or suffer through my 6 Mbps CenturyStink DSL. Cox has pay as you go wifi stations going up, but the connection speeds and lag times are still awful and depend on things like weather, and whether or not the Dollar Store has a semi in their parking lot. LOL The electric company here bases your deposit on the last three residents to have service at that address. So it's around $350 most places. I'm in favor of a great big wall south of here.
 

Pinky

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Narf City, USA
Nope. ISPs absolutely can afford to run fiber to everyone and still be profitable, but screw investing when the FCC hands you a free lunch.

Not in rural areas. Divide cost of infrastructure installation and maintenance by number of subscribers. VERY simple math.

- - - Updated - - -

I don't have, nor do I want, a smart phone. And I live in the capitol of my state. A short half block walk to the main road and I can see downtown. Traffic willing, I'm a 10 minute bus ride from the governor's office and DSL/CenturyStink is my only option.

They make devices that are effectively wireless access points that connect to cellular services (think internet modem, except it connects you to a cell tower instead of fiber/cable). Has nothing to do with 'smartphones'.
 
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Alaric

New Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2011
Location
Satan's Colon, US
I was thinking more in terms of the lousy cell service I see and hear about regularly. Along with it not seeming particularly secure.
 

petteyg359

Likes Popcorn
Joined
Jul 31, 2004
Not in rural areas. Divide cost of infrastructure installation and maintenance by number of subscribers. VERY simple math.

- - - Updated - - -

Yes, very simple math when they vastly overinflate the "maintenance" numbers. At consumer prices (e.g. Home Depot / Monoprice), a mile of single-mode fiber is around $1000. A mile of half-inch steel conduit is $1500. So yes, in places where you don't have more than one home per mile, the initial investment is rather large. However, when they charge $100+ per month for their services, their time-to-100% ROI is also very simple math.
 

Pinky

Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2001
Location
Narf City, USA
Yes, very simple math when they vastly overinflate the "maintenance" numbers. At consumer prices (e.g. Home Depot / Monoprice), a mile of single-mode fiber is around $1000. A mile of half-inch steel conduit is $1500. So yes, in places where you don't have more than one home per mile, the initial investment is rather large. However, when they charge $100+ per month for their services, their time-to-100% ROI is also very simple math.

There's a lot more to it than dropping some conduit and wire on the ground.

- - - Updated - - -

I was thinking more in terms of the lousy cell service I see and hear about regularly. Along with it not seeming particularly secure.

How's the cell service in your apartment/house?

How does it "seem" any more/less secure?