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easiest way to permanently assign ip addresses from router?

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FudgeNuggets

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2006
Location
Gone Racing
I got a new wireless router. What is the easiest way to permanently assign ip addresses to the wireless device? It's a D-Link DI-624

I'm guessing that I would have to put the MAC address in somewhere and then give it an ip address right so I can have:

desktop - MAC address - xxx.xxx.xxx.101

netbook -MAC address - xxx.xxx.xxx.102

Xbox - MAC address - xxx.xxx.xxx.103

PS3 -MAC address - xxx.xxx.xxx.104

Wii -MAC address - xxx.xxx.xxx.105

phone - Mac address - xxx.xxx.xxx.106

etc....
 

dropadrop

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2001
Location
Finland
First thing you will want to do is limit the range of addresses the dhcp server built into the router gives out So instead of xxx.1 - xxx.254 you will give out for example xxx.1 - xxx.128.

After this you will assign the ip-addresses by mac address just as you stated above, starting from above the dhcp range (in this example case starting from ip xxx.129 and upwards.

I don't have a dlink router so can't tell you what page / what terms they use. If you are updating the firmware please note there has just been a vulnerability regarding remote management found, and as far as I'm aware it's only patched in a new beta firmware. They did mention it does not affect any of the firmwares the routers shipped with so unless you updated you should be safe.
 
OP
F

FudgeNuggets

Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2006
Location
Gone Racing
First thing you will want to do is limit the range of addresses the dhcp server built into the router gives out So instead of xxx.1 - xxx.254 you will give out for example xxx.1 - xxx.128.

After this you will assign the ip-addresses by mac address just as you stated above, starting from above the dhcp range (in this example case starting from ip xxx.129 and upwards.

I don't have a dlink router so can't tell you what page / what terms they use. If you are updating the firmware please note there has just been a vulnerability regarding remote management found, and as far as I'm aware it's only patched in a new beta firmware. They did mention it does not affect any of the firmwares the routers shipped with so unless you updated you should be safe.

Ok, so if I limit it to xxx.1 -xxx.128 then why do I start wanting to assign my machines outside that range at .129? Is that to avoid conflicts? How would I tell it to give out no addresses but the ones I assign to my devices via MAC address?

I'll check into the firmware thing. I just did an update to the latest one after I got the router.
 

dropadrop

Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2001
Location
Finland
Usually a DHCP server will contain different ranges for different purposes. Part will be for sharing out via dhcp (to anyone requesting), part will be given out by mac address as defined elsewhere. It's the same application (DHCP server) but most consumer routers place the configuration on different pages as if they where completly different features.

If you don't want any addresses to be given out automatically via dhcp then I guess that feature could be disabled. I would first start by configuring the "static ip's" though, verify it works and then if it breaks down while disabling the dhcp function you know it has completely removed all dhcp functionality (including the ability to give ip's based on mac address).

A lot of routers can also have another feature where you can filter out any traffic that does not match your mac addresses. If the only thing you want to achieve is to deny access from strangers then this would be the correct route, as it might also prevent your neighbors from assigning ip addresses from your network by hand and completely bypassing your dhcp server.

So:

Mac address based filter - prevent people from accessing your network (at least wireless) unless they have a whitelisted mac address. Fairly easy to work around if they can find out what your mac address is, but will deter some attackers (sometimes this only works for the wireless interface).

Mac address based mapping of ip addresses (DHCP) - ensure all your machines always get the same ip address.

Both features can be used together or separately.